C Itié

Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Fontenay, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (24)12.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the results of the simulation of a radiophotoluminescent (RPL) dosemeter with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX. The aim of this study is to calculate the response with MCNPX of the RPL dosemeter in terms of equivalent doses H(p) (0.07) and H(p)(10) using X-ray photon radiation qualities N series, together with S-Cs and S-Co nuclide radiation qualities, specified in ISO 4037-1. After comparison with reference values versus experimental results, the deviation of the theoretical responses of the RPL dosemeter proved to be lower than 5 % for reference values and lower than 10 % for experimental results. This good correlation validates the model over the energy range studied.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 02/2011; 144(1-4):231-3. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Active personal dosemeters (APD) have been found to be very efficient tools to reduce occupational doses in many applications of ionizing radiation. In order to be used in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC), APDs should be able to measure low energy photons and pulsed radiation with relatively high instantaneous personal dose equivalent rates. A study concerning the optimization of the use of APDs in IR/IC was performed in the framework of the ORAMED project, a Collaborative Project (2008–2011) supported by the European Commission within its 7th Framework Program. In particular, eight commercial APDs were tested in continuous and pulsed X-ray fields delivered by calibration laboratories in order to evaluate their performances. Most of APDs provide a response in pulsed mode more or less affected by the personal dose equivalent rate, which means they could be used in routine monitoring provided that correction factors are introduced. These results emphasize the importance of adding tests in pulsed mode in type-test procedures for APDs. Some general recommendations are proposed in the end of this paper for the selection and use of APDs at IR/IC workplaces.
    Radiation Measurements - RADIAT MEAS. 01/2011; 46(11):1252-1257.
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    ABSTRACT: The work package 3 of the ORAMED project, Collaborative Project (2008-11) supported by the European Commission within its seventh Framework Programme, is focused on the optimisation of the use of active personal dosemeters (APDs) in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC). Indeed, a lack of appropriate APD devices is identified for these specific fields. Few devices can detect low-energy X rays (20-100 keV), and none of them are specifically designed for working in pulsed radiation fields. The work presented in this paper consists in studying the behaviour of some selected APDs deemed suitable for application in IR/IC. For this purpose, measurements under laboratory conditions, both with continuous and pulsed X-ray beams, and tests in real conditions on site in different European hospitals were performed. This study highlights the limitations of APDs for this application and the need of improving the APD technology so as to fulfil all needs in the IR/IC field.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 12/2010; 144(1-4):453-8. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The optimization of the use of active personal dosemeters (APDs) in interventional radiology is performed by one of the work packages of the ORAMED project (2008-2011), which is a Collaborative Project supported by the European Commission within its 7th Framework Program. Interventional radiology procedures can be very complex and they can lead to relatively high doses to medical staff who stand close to the primary radiation field and are mostly exposed to radiation scattered by the patient. For the adequate dosimetry of these scattered photons, APDs must be able to respond to low-energy [10-100 keV] and pulsed radiation with relatively high instantaneous dose rates. Very few devices can detect low energy radiation fields and none of them are specially designed for working in pulsed radiation fields. The work presented in this paper is aimed at 1) studying the radiation field characteristics encountered in interventional radiology 2) making a selection of APDs deemed suitable for application in interventional radiology 3) defining, by measurements under laboratory conditions, the dose, the energy, the dose rate and the angular response of the selected APDs. KeywordsORAMED-active personal dosemeters-interventional radiology-pulsed radiation
    12/2009: pages 132-135;
  • Proceedings of the International Workshop on Uncertainty Assessment in Computational Dosimetry, a comparison of approaches; 10/2008
  • Proceedings of the International Workshop on Uncertainty Assessment in Computational Dosimetry. 10/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: An overview of the use of active personal dosemeters (APD) in interventional radiology is presented. It is based on the work done by the working package 7 of the CONRAD coordinated action supported by the EC within the frame of the 6th FP. This study was done in collaboration with the working package 4 of CONRAD to deal with the calculations required for studying the new calibration facility. The main requirements of the standard for the APD and the difficulties caused by the use of pulsed radiations are presented through the results of an intercomparison organised in a realistic calibration facility similar to the workplace situation in interventional radiology. The main characteristics of this facility are presented.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 09/2008; 131(1):87-92. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An intercomparison of ring dosemeters has been organised with the aim of assessing the technical capabilities of available extremity dosemeters and focusing on their performance at clinical workplaces with potentially high extremity doses. Twenty-four services from 16 countries participated in the intercomparison. The dosemeters were exposed to reference photon ((137)Cs) and beta ((147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y) fields together with fields representing realistic exposure situations in interventional radiology (direct and scattered radiation) and nuclear medicine ((99 m)Tc and (18)F). It has been found that most dosemeters provided satisfactory measurements of H(p)(0.07) for photon radiation, both in reference and realistic fields. However, only four dosemeters fulfilled the established requirements for all radiation qualities. The main difficulties were found for the measurement of low-energy beta radiation. Finally, the results also showed a general under-response of detectors to (18)F, which was attributed to the difficulties of the dosimetric systems to measure the positron contribution to the dose.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 09/2008; 131(1):67-72. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interventional radiology procedures can be very complex and they can lead to relatively high doses to personnel who stand close to the primary radiation field and are mostly exposed to radiation scattered by the patient. For the adequate dosimetry of the scattered photons, APDs must be able to respond to low-energy [10–100 keV] and pulsed radiation with relatively high instantaneous dose rates. An intercomparison of five APD models deemed suitable for application in interventional radiology was organised in March 2007. The intercomparison used pulsed and continuous radiation beams, at CEA-LIST (Saclay, France) and IRSN (Fontenay-aux-Roses, France), respectively. A specific configuration, close to the clinical practice, was considered. The reference dose, in terms of Hp(10), was derived from air kerma measurements and from the measured and calculated energy distributions of the scattered radiation field. Additional Monte Carlo calculations were performed to investigate the energy spectra for different experimental conditions of the intercomparison. The results of this intercomparison are presented in this work and indicate which APDs are able to provide a correct response when used in the specific low-energy spectra and dose rates of pulsed X-rays encountered in interventional radiology.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 06/2008; · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the framework of the CONRAD project, the EURADOS WG9 organized an intercomparison of extremity dosimeters that are used in a variety of medical fields. The overall objective of the intercomparison was to verify the performance of different extremity ring dosimeters to measure the quantity Hp(0.07) in photon and beta reference fields as well as in realistic fields in interventional radiology (IR) and nuclear medicine. The selection of the participating services has been done in a way to have a good representation of different types of detectors, filter materials and filter thicknesses that are used in Europe. All the irradiations have been performed on the ISO rod phantom. For the reference fields, the reference values of Hp(0.07) have been determined by the irradiation laboratories with traceability to primary calibrations, in agreement with the relevant standards. For the realistic fields, the reference values have been obtained with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations. The vast majority of the services fulfill the accuracy requirements according to the European Technical Recommendations for the photon and realistic IR fields. However, only a limited number of services fulfill these requirements in all tested beta irradiation configurations.
    Radiation Measurements 01/2008; · 0.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Interventional radiology, the medical staff stands close to the patient during his exposure to X-rays. Consequently, they can be exposed to relatively high doses due to radiation scattered by the patient and the medical equipment. Contrary to the passive dosemeters which assess the doses a posteriori, APDs are able to warn the medical staff when doses and/or dose rates exceed pre-defined radiation protection limits. At IR workplaces, APDs must be able to measure low-energy photons (10-120 keV) and pulsed radiations with relatively high instantaneous dose rates. Six ADP models, considered as suitable for application in IR were selected to carry out a new comparison in 2007. This paper describes the irradiation assemblies both for realistic and classic calibration facilities. The reference values of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), were determined through measurements and simulations to calculate the response of the APDs. The results shed light on the ability of APDs to measure correctly the doses, when used in the specific low-energy spectra and dose rates of pulsed X-rays encountered in interventional radiology.
    01/2008;
  • Proceedings of the CONRADWP4 Workshop on ‘ Uncertainty Assessment in Computational Dosimetry’; 10/2007
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    ABSTRACT: IRSN has been asked by SNCF (French Railways) to carry out measurements in order to establish the values of ambient dose equivalents H*(10) in the vicinity of shipments of radioactive materials to assess the external exposure to ionising radiation to which employees may be subjected during the carriage of radioactive goods. Detailed dosimetric characterisations of the wagons have been made and the external exposure at different stages of the work that is done by the employees have been measured in terms of H*(10). For the study presented in this paper, and corresponding to a used fuel shipment composed of UO2 and UO2-PuO2, it has been observed that the photon and neutron doses are very similar. In addition, the order of magnitude of the total dose integrated by an employee who would carry out 100 times the series of essential operational tasks, has been found to be approximately 250 microSv. This value is compared with those observed for other previously investigated shipments involving the exposure to photon fields only.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 02/2007; 125(1-4):369-75. · 0.91 Impact Factor
  • S Mikami, C Itié, C Texier
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the characterisation performed at IRSN (France) of an H(p)(10) chamber in terms of calibration coefficient and correction factors for the radiation qualities of ISO narrow spectrum series. The chamber response, expressed in H(p)(10) using conversion coefficients h(p)(K)(10; N, alpha) listed in ISO 4037-3 in the energy range from 30 to 1250 keV and for angles of incidence between 0 and 70 degrees, was found to be within approximately 10%. However, for photon energies <30 keV, an overresponse of the chamber that could reach 100% was observed. Nevertheless, this overresponse was reduced to 25% using the conversion coefficients estimated at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). This implies that the X-ray spectra produced by the IRSN X-ray units are very similar to those produced by PTB, both containing a little bit more high-energy photons than the spectra used in ISO 4037-3. The dose rate dependence of the chamber tested by gamma radiation from (60)Co sources was found to be within 2% in the range of 0.3 mSv h(-1) to 1 Sv h(-1). The H(p)(10) chamber can measure directly the conventional true value of H(p)(10) after calibration by a reference laboratory, and can be used for transferring H(p)(10) reference quantities from a reference laboratory.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 01/2007; 123(1):122-7. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This work describes spectral distributions of neutrons obtained as function of energy and direction at four workplace fields at the Krümmel reactor in Germany. Values of personal dose equivalent H(p)(10) and effective dose E are determined for different directions of a person's orientation in these fields and readings of personal neutron dosemeters--especially electronic dosemeters--are discussed with respect to H(p)(10) and E.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 02/2006; 120(1-4):378-82. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems took place in the SILENE reactor, in June 2002. Participants from 60 laboratories irradiated their dosemeters (physical and biological) using two different configurations of the reactor. In preparation for this intercomparison, the leakage radiation fields were characterised by spectrometry and dosimetry measurements using the ROSPEC spectrometer associated with a NE-213 scintillator, ionisation chambers, GM counters, diodes and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). For this intercomparison, a large area was required to irradiate the dosemeters both in free air and on phantoms. Therefore, measurements of the uniformity of the field were performed with activation detectors and TLDs for neutron and gammas, respectively. This paper describes the procedures used and the results obtained.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 02/2004; 110(1-4):459-64. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In criticality accident dosimetry and more generally for high dose measurements, special techniques are used to measure separately the gamma ray and neutron components of the dose. To improve these techniques and to check their dosimetry systems (physical and/or biological), a total of 60 laboratories from 29 countries (America, Europe, Asia) participated in an international intercomparaison, which took place in France from 9 to 21 June 2002, at the SILENE reactor in Valduc and at a pure gamma source in Fontenay-aux-Roses. This intercomparison was jointly organised by the IRSN and the CEA with the help of the NEA/OCDE and was partly supported by the European Communities. This paper describes the aim of this intercomparison, the techniques used by the participants and the two radiation sources and their characteristics. The experimental arrangements of the dosemeters for the irradiations in free air or on phantoms are given. Then the dosimetric quantities measured and reported by the participants are summarised, analysed and compared with the reference values. The present paper concerns only the physical dosimetry and essentially experiments performed on the SILENE facility. The results obtained with the biological dosimetry are published in two other papers of this issue.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 02/2004; 110(1-4):429-36. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) standard neutron detector in the energy range 60–800 keV is a spherical proportional counter of HARWELL type SP2 nominally filled with 300 kPa hydrogen. It was characterised in the monoenergetic neutron fields of PTB at the energies of 144, 250 and 565 keV, where the neutron energy and fluence were determined with the PTB reference instruments. The neutron fields produced at the same energies with the accelerator facility of Bruyères-le-Châtel were then investigated with the calibrated SP2 counter and various PTB instruments in order to determine the mean energy and the neutron fluence. The energy scale and a neutron fluence monitor were calibrated.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 01/2002;
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    ABSTRACT: The new ICPR60 recommendations and the consideration of the ALARA principle have led the operators of nuclear facilities to evaluate with a higher care, the doses received by workers. The aim of this paper is to present a recent study concerning mixed field characterisation at a workplace located in a reprocessing laboratory.As a first step, neutron spectrum determination was achieved by two ways: simulation using MCNP code and experimental measurements with Bonner spheres and recoil proton counters. Neutron spectrum allowed the evaluation of dosimetric quantities. Measurements were then performed with different devices routinely used in radioprotection. The authors describe the measurement techniques, present the results obtained, and finally compare and discuss them.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 01/2002; 476(1):440-445. · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The VENUS facility is a zero-power research reactor mainly devoted to studies on LWR fuels. Localised high-neutron rates were found around the reactor, with a neutron/gamma dose equivalent rate ratio as high as three. Therefore, a study of the neutron dosimetry around the reactor was started some years ago. During this study, several methods of neutron spectroscopy were employed and a study of individual and ambient dosemeters was performed.A first spectrometric measurement was done with the IPSN multisphere spectrometer in three positions around the reactor. Secondly, the ROSPEC spectrometer from the Fraunhofer Institut was used. The spectra were also measured with the bubble interactive neutron spectrometer. These measurements were compared with a numerical simulation of the neutron field made with the code TRIPOLI-3. Dosimetric measurements were made with three types of personal neutron dosemeters: an albedo type, a track etch detector and a bubble detector.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 01/2002;