Geraldine S Perry

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, MI, United States

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Publications (33)78.48 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: There is limited information from population-based investigations of the associations between sleep duration and sleep disorders and parameters of glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to examine cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and sleep disordered breathing with concentrations of insulin, fasting and 2-hour glucose, and HbA1c. Data from 12150 adults aged ≥20 years without diagnosed diabetes (5015 with an oral glucose tolerance test) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 were used. Information about sleep duration (2005-2010) and sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing (2005-2008) was obtained via questionnaire. An estimated 35.8% of participants reported sleeping ≤6 hours/night, 62.1% reported sleeping 7-9 hours/night, and 2.0% reported sleeping ≥10 hours/night. In 2005-2008, 33.0% reported snoring ≥5 nights per week, 5.9% reported they snorted, gasped, or stopped breathing ≥5 nights/week, and 4.2% reported sleep apnea. Sleep duration was significantly associated with fasting concentrations of insulin and concentrations of HbA1c only in models that did not adjust for body mass index. Concentrations of fasting and 2-hour glucose were significantly associated with sleep duration in models that adjusted only for age. Snoring frequency was positively associated with concentrations of insulin and HbA1c. Frequency of snorting or stopping breathing and sleep apnea status were associated with concentrations of insulin and of HbA1c only when body mass index was not accounted for. In a representative sample of U.S. adults, concentrations of insulin and HbA1c were significantly associated with short sleep duration, possibly mediated by body mass index.
    Journal of Diabetes 10/2013; · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine the form of the relationship between sleep duration and anthropometric measures and possible differences in these relationships by gender and race or ethnicity. Design and Methods: We used data for 13742 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010. Sleep duration was categorized as ≤6 (short sleepers), 7-9, and ≥10 hours (long sleepers). Results: Short sleepers were as much as 1.7 kg/m(2) (SE 0.4) heavier and had 3.4 cm (SE 1.0) more girth than long sleepers. Among participants without depression or a diagnosed sleep disorder, sleep duration was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in an inverse linear association in the entire sample, men, women, whites, African Americans, and participants aged 18-39 years. No evidence for statistical interaction by gender and race or ethnicity was observed. Regression coefficients were notably stronger among adults aged 20-39 years. Compared to participants who reported sleeping 7-9 hours per night, short sleepers were more likely to be obese and have abdominal obesity. Conclusions: In this nationally representative sample of U.S. adults, an inverse linear association most consistently characterized the association between sleep duration and BMI and waist circumference.
    Obesity 07/2013; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE This investigation examined the association of anxiety or depressive disorder and frequent insufficient sleep. METHODS Data were obtained from a 2010 telephone survey of a population-based sample of 113,936 adults in 20 states. Respondents were asked how often they did not get enough rest or sleep and if they had ever received a diagnosis of an anxiety or depressive disorder. Frequent insufficient sleep was defined as insufficient rest or sleep during ≥14 of the past 30 days. RESULTS Frequent insufficient sleep was reported by 27.0% of the sample and was significantly more common (p<.05) among respondents who reported both anxiety and depressive disorders (48.6%), depressive disorders only (39.0%), or anxiety only (37.5%) than among adults who reported neither disorder (23.1%). CONCLUSIONS Frequent insufficient sleep is associated with depressive and anxiety disorders, and the odds of the sleep disorder are increased when both classes of psychiatric disorders are diagnosed.
    Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.) 04/2013; 64(4):385-7. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although evidence suggests that poor sleep is associated with chronic disease, little research has been conducted to assess the relationships between insufficient sleep, frequent mental distress (FMD >=14 days during the past 30 days), obesity, and chronic disease including diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, asthma, and arthritis. METHODS: Data from 375,653 US adults aged >= 18 years in the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to assess the relationships between insufficient sleep and chronic disease. The relationships were further examined using a multivariate logistic regression model after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and potential mediators (FMD and obesity). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of insufficient sleep during the past 30 days was 10.4% for all 30 days, 17.0% for 14--29 days, 42.0% for 1--13 days, and 30.6% for zero day. The positive relationships between insufficient sleep and each of the six chronic disease were significant (p < 0.0001) after adjustment for covariates and were modestly attenuated but not fully explained by FMD. The relationships between insufficient sleep and both diabetes and high blood pressure were also modestly attenuated but not fully explained by obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of sleep quantity and quality and additional efforts to encourage optimal sleep and sleep health should be considered in routine medical examinations. Ongoing research designed to test treatments for obesity, mental distress, or various chronic diseases should also consider assessing the impact of these treatments on sleep health.
    BMC Public Health 01/2013; 13(1):84. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have previously been demonstrated to be adversely associated with a variety of health outcomes in adulthood, their specific association with sleep among adults has not been examined. To better address this issue, this study examines the relationship between eight self-reported ACEs and frequent insufficient sleep among community-dwelling adults residing in 5 U.S. states in 2009. METHODS: To assess whether ACEs were associated with frequent insufficient sleep (respondent did not get sufficient rest or sleep >=14 days in past 30 days) in adulthood, we analyzed ACE data collected in the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a random-digit-dialed telephone survey in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. ACEs included physical abuse, sexual abuse, verbal abuse, household mental illness, incarcerated household members, household substance abuse, parental separation/divorce, and witnessing domestic violence before age 18. Smoking status and frequent mental distress (FMD) (>=14 days in past 30 days when self-perceived mental health was not good) were assessed as potential mediators in multivariate logistic regression analyses of frequent insufficient sleep by ACEs adjusted for race/ethnicity, gender, education, and body mass index. RESULTS: Overall, 28.8% of 25,810 respondents reported frequent insufficient sleep, 18.8% were current smokers, 10.8% reported frequent mental distress, 59.5% percent reported >=1 ACE, and 8.7% reported >= 5 ACEs. Each ACE was associated with frequent insufficient sleep in multivariate analyses. Odds of frequent insufficient sleep were 2.5 (95% CI, 2.1-3.0) times higher in persons with >=5 ACEs compared to those with no ACEs. Most relationships were modestly attenuated by smoking and FMD, but remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood exposures to eight indicators of child maltreatment and household dysfunction were significantly associated with frequent insufficient sleep during adulthood in this population. ACEs could be potential indicators promoting further investigation of sleep insufficiency, along with consideration of FMD and smoking.
    BMC Public Health 01/2013; 13(1):3. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. Frequent insufficient sleep, defined as ≥14 days/past 30 days in which an adult did not get enough rest or sleep, is associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Little is known about the prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Methods. We assessed racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep from the combined 2009-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey among 810,168 respondents who self-identified as non-Hispanic white (NHW, n = 671,448), non-Hispanic black (NHB, n = 67,685), Hispanic (n = 59,528), or AI/AN (n = 11,507). Results. We found significantly higher unadjusted prevalences (95% CI) of frequent insufficient sleep among AI/AN (34.2% [32.1-36.4]) compared to NHW (27.4% [27.1-27.6]). However, the age-adjusted excess prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep in AI/AN compared to NHW was decreased but remained significant with the addition of sex, education, and employment status; this latter relationship was further attenuated by the separate additions of obesity and lifestyle indicators, but was no longer significant with the addition of frequent mental distress to the model (PR = 1.05; 95% CI : 0.99-1.13). This is the first report of a high prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep among AI/AN. These results further suggest that investigation of sleep health interventions addressing frequent mental distress may benefit AI/AN populations.
    Journal of Environmental and Public Health 01/2013; 2013:259645.
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if self-reported sleep duration was associated with weight-control behaviors among US high school students. National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. United States, 2007. US high school students (N = 12,087). Students were asked if they had engaged in several weight-control behaviors during the 30 days before the survey to lose or maintain weight. Self-reported sleep duration categories included very short (≤ 5 h), short (6 or 7 h), referent moderate (8 or 9 h), and long (≥ 10 h). Sex-specific logistic regression analyses with race/ethnicity, grade, and body mass index category as covariates were conducted using SUDAAN to account for complex study design. Approximately half the students reported short sleep duration (51.8% of males and 54.3% of females), whereas very short sleep durations were reported by another 14.8% of males and 16.9% of females. Among males, very short sleepers were significantly (P < 0.05) more likely than moderate sleepers to report dieting (36.3% versus 26.1%), fasting (14.2% versus 4.3%), and purging (4.3% versus 1.1%) to lose or maintain weight during the 30 days before the survey. Among females, the respective very short, short, and moderate sleepers varied (P < 0.05) in dieting (59.9%, 55.0%, and 47.5% respectively), fasting (28.3%, 15.2%, and 10.3%, respectively), and taking diet pills (13.3%, 6.8%, and 4.3%, respectively). Prevalence of purging was significantly higher only for very short sleepers (12.3%, 6.0%, and 3.9%, respectively). Self-reported short sleep duration was associated with dieting and three unhealthy weight-control behaviors in this population. If our findings are confirmed, intervention studies should be conducted to examine the effect of educational interventions. Wheaton AG; Perry GS; Chapman DP; Croft JB. Self-reported sleep duration and weight-control strategies among US high school students. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1139-1145.
    Sleep 01/2013; 36(8):1139-45. · 5.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence indicates that chronic diseases and mental illness are associated. In the Middle Eastern country of Jordan, chronic diseases and frequent mental distress (FMD) are increasing; however, the capacity for mental health care is limited. The objective of this study was to determine the association between FMD, chronic conditions, and adverse health behaviors in Jordan. The third cycle of the Jordan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (2007) served as the data source for this study. The sample consisted of 3,612 noninstitutionalized Jordanian adults aged 18 years or older. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios for the association between chronic conditions, health behaviors, and FMD adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, income, and employment. In the adjusted models, people with hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-2.7), high cholesterol (AOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.2), diabetes (AOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and asthma (AOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.5-3.1) and smokers (AOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0) were more likely to have FMD than people without each of these conditions. Adults who reported vigorous physical activity were less likely to have FMD (AOR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) than their less active counterparts. In Jordan, FMD was associated with several chronic conditions. As a result, we suggest additional research to examine the complex relationship between FMD and chronic conditions. More doctors in the primary health care system should be trained in mental health.
    Preventing chronic disease 01/2013; 10:E140. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    Preventing chronic disease 01/2013; 10:E133. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Our study assesses the relationships between self-reported adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) (including sexual, physical, or verbal abuse, along with household dysfunction including parental separation or divorce, domestic violence, mental illness, substance abuse, or incarcerated household member) and unemployment status in five US states in 2009. METHODS: We examined these relationships using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data from 17,469 respondents (aged 18-64 years) who resided in five states, completed the ACE Questionnaire, and provided socio-demographic and social support information. We also assessed the mediation of these relationships by respondents' educational attainment, marital status, and social support. RESULTS: About two-third of respondents reported having had at least one ACEs, while 15.1 % of men and 19.3 % of women reported having had ≥4 ACEs. Among both men and women, the unemployment rate in 2009 was significantly higher among those who reported having had any ACE than among those who reported no ACEs (p < 0.05). Educational attainment, marital status, and social support mediated the relationship between ACEs and unemployment, particularly among women. CONCLUSIONS: ACEs appear to be associated with increased risk for unemployment among men and women. Further studies may be needed to better understand how education, marital status, and social support mediate the association between multiple ACEs and unemployment.
    Social Psychiatry 08/2012; · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether level of positive mental health complements mental illness in predicting students at risk for suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance. A sample of 5,689 college students participated in the 2007 Healthy Minds Study and completed an Internet survey that included the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form and the Patient Health Questionnaire screening scales for depression and anxiety disorders, questions about suicide ideation, plans, and attempts, and academic impairment. Just under half (49.3%) of students were flourishing and did not screen positive for a mental disorder. Among students who did, and those who did not, screen for a mental disorder, suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance were lowest in those with flourishing, higher among those with moderate, and highest in those with languishing mental health. Positive mental health complements mental disorder screening in mental health surveillance and prediction of suicidal behavior and impairment of academic performance.
    Journal of American College Health 02/2012; 60(2):126-33. · 1.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing attention is being focused on sleep duration as a potential modifiable risk factor associated with obesity in children and adolescents. We analyzed data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey to describe the association of obesity (self-report BMI ≥95th percentile) with self-reported sleep duration on an average school night, among a representative sample of US high school students. Using logistic regression to control for demographic and behavioral confounders, among female students, compared to 7 hours of sleep, both shortened (≤4 hours of sleep; adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval), AOR = 1.50 (1.05-2.15)) and prolonged (≥9 hours of sleep; AOR = 1.54 (1.13-2.10)) sleep durations were associated with increased likelihood of obesity. Among male students, there was no significant association between obesity and sleep duration. Better understanding of factors underlying the association between sleep duration and obesity is needed before recommending alteration of sleep time as a means of addressing the obesity epidemic among adolescents.
    Journal of obesity 01/2012; 2012:476914.
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if symptoms of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are associated with depression symptomology in a national sample. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. U.S., 2005-2008. 9,714 adults (≥ 18 years). Respondents were asked about frequency of snoring and snorting, gasping, or stopping breathing while asleep and completed the PHQ-9 (a 9-item depression screener). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for SDB symptom-associated probable major depression (defined as a PHQ-9 score ≥ 10) were obtained from sex-specific logistic regression analyses adjusted for body mass index, age, race/ethnicity, and education. Among men, 6.0% reported physician-diagnosed sleep apnea, 37.2% snored ≥ 5 nights/week, 7.1% snorted/stopped breathing ≥ 5 nights/week, and 5.0% had PHQ-9 scores ≥ 10. Among women, 3.1% reported sleep apnea, 22.4% snored ≥ 5 nights/week, 4.3% snorted/stopped breathing ≥ 5 nights/week, and 8.4% had PHQ-9 scores ≥ 10. Sleep apnea was associated with probable major depression (OR = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.5, 3.6 among men; OR = 5.2; 95% CI: 2.7, 9.9 among women). Snoring was not associated with depression symptoms in men or women. Snorting/stopping breathing ≥ 5 nights/week compared to never was strongly associated with probable major depression in men (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.8, 5.2) and women (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.6, 5.4). Frequent snorting/stopping breathing was associated with probable major depression by the PHQ-9 in a national sample of adults. Additional research may be needed to determine whether regular screening for these conditions by mental health professionals and sleep specialists should be recommended.
    Sleep 01/2012; 35(4):461-7. · 5.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While short sleep duration has been related to hypertension, the impact of age and sex on this association is less well known. We examined the association between hours of sleep and hypertension prevalence among US adults by age and sex. The study was conducted using data from the 2007-2009 National Health Interview Surveys (NHISs). The association between self-reported hours of sleep and prevalence of hypertension was assessed after stratifying by age and sex. Among 71,455 participants, age-standardized hypertension prevalence rates (%) were 32.4, 25.5, 22.2, 23.2, 25.5, and 32.5 among adults reporting sleep of <6, 6, 7, 8, 9, and ≥10 h/day, respectively (P < 0.001). There was a "U"-shaped association of hours of sleep and hypertension prevalence among all age and sex subgroups. Logistic regression models, using 8 h sleep/day as the referent, showed a greater likelihood of hypertension among those who slept <7 or ≥10 h/day after adjusting for sociodemographic, behavior, and health characteristics. Further stratifying by age and sex, while adjusting for all other characteristics, revealed that among adults less than 45 years, short (<6 h for men and <8 h for women) and long (≥10 h for men) sleep were associated with higher likelihood of hypertension. For other age/sex groups, short sleep (<6 h) was associated with higher likelihood of hypertension among middle-aged men and older women, as was long sleep (≥10 h) among middle-aged women. This national sample study suggests that the association between hours of sleep and hypertension varies by age and sex.
    American Journal of Hypertension 11/2011; 25(3):335-41. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine associations between insufficient sleep (<8h on average school nights) and health-risk behaviors. 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey data of U.S. high school students (n=12,154) were analyzed. Associations were examined on weighted data using multivariate logistic regression. Insufficient sleep on an average school night was reported by 68.9% of students. Insufficient sleep was associated with higher odds of current use of cigarettes (age-adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-1.93), marijuana (AOR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.31-1.76), and alcohol (AOR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.46-1.84); current sexual activity (AOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.25-1.59); seriously considered attempting suicide (AOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.60-2.16); feeling sad or hopeless (AOR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.43-1.84); physical fighting (AOR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.24-1.60), not being physically active at least 60min ≥ 5days in the past 7days (AOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.04-1.29), using the computer ≥3h/day (AOR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.38-1.80), and drinking soda/pop > 1time/day (AOR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.03-1.28). Two-thirds of adolescent students reported insufficient sleep, which was associated with many health-risk behaviors. Greater awareness of the impact of sleep insufficiency is vital.
    Preventive Medicine 08/2011; 53(4-5):271-3. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has become increasingly recognized that insufficient sleep is associated with adverse health outcomes. Studies have observed that sleep duration and daytime sleepiness varies by sex and marital status. Few studies have examined the impact of the number of children on sleep. To evaluate the association of marital status and number of children with insufficient sleep and in a large national sample. We analyzed data from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, a population-based telephone survey of non-institutionalized US adults (N = 395,407), in which respondents were asked, "During the past 30 days, for about how many days have you felt you did not get enough rest or sleep?" We used sex-specific, multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations of marital status (married, previously married, never married) and the number of children in the household with frequent insufficient sleep (≥14 days in past 30 days) after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and education. In this study population, 23% were never married, 60% were married, and 17% were previously married. Forty-three percent reported having children aged <18 years in the household. Married men (24.3%) were less likely to report frequent insufficient sleep than never married men (28.0%) or previously married men (28.8%). Never married women (33.4%) were more likely to report frequent insufficient sleep than currently married (29.0%) or previously married women (29.0%). The likelihood of frequent insufficient sleep increased in a linear fashion with the number of children in the household for all subgroups (P < 0.05) except among never married men. These findings suggest that the presence of children in the household often increases the frequency of insufficient rest or sleep among the adults with whom they reside. Thus, health care providers may wish to consider the presence of children under 18 years of age a potential "risk factor" for insufficient sleep when counseling adults in the household about the importance of sleep to overall health.
    Journal of Community Health 07/2011; 37(2):344-9. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to examine the associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and smoking behavior among a random sample of adults living in five U.S. states. We used data from 25,809 participants of the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to assess the relationship of each of the 8 adverse childhood experiences and the adverse childhood experience score to smoking status. Some 59.4% of men and women reported at least one adverse childhood experience. Each of the eight adverse childhood experiences measures was significantly associated with smoking status after adjustment for demographic variables. The prevalence ratios for current and ever smoking increased in a positive graded fashion as the adverse childhood experience score increased. Among adults who reported no adverse childhood experiences, 13.0% were currently smoking and 38.3% had ever smoked. Compared to participants with an adverse childhood experience score of 0, those with an adverse childhood experience score of 5 or more were more likely to be a current smoker (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR): 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.92-2.57) and to have ever smoked (aPR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.67-1.93). Further research is warranted to determine whether the prevention of and interventions for adverse childhood experiences might reduce the burden of smoking-related illness in the general population.
    Preventive Medicine 06/2011; 53(3):188-93. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbances are associated with an increased risk for many chronic diseases and unhealthy behaviors. A history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is also associated with similar adult health outcomes. We studied the relationship between multiple ACEs and the likelihood of experiencing self-reported sleep disturbances in adulthood. We used data from the adverse childhood experiences (ACE) study, a retrospective cohort study of 17,337 adult health maintenance organization members in California who completed a survey about eight ACEs, which included childhood abuse and growing up with various forms of household dysfunction. The self-reported sleep disturbances measured included ever having trouble falling or staying asleep and feeling tired after a good night's sleep. We used an integer count of the number of ACEs (the ACE score) to assess the cumulative impact of these experiences on the likelihood of self-reported sleep disturbances. Thirty-three percent of the cohort reported trouble falling or staying asleep, while 24% reported feeling tired after sleeping. All eight ACE categories were associated with an increased likelihood of self-reported sleep disturbances (p<0.05). Compared to persons with an ACE score of 0, those with an ACE score ≥ 5 were 2.1 (95% CI: 1.8-2.4) times more likely to report trouble falling or staying asleep and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.7-2.3) times more likely to report feeling tired even after a good night's sleep. The trend for increasing odds for both types of self-reported sleep disturbance with increasing ACE scores was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Adverse childhood experiences were associated with self-reported sleep disturbances in adulthood, and the ACE score had a graded relationship to these sleep disturbances. A history of ACEs should be obtained for patients with self-reported sleep disturbances to coordinate services that ameliorate the long-term effects of these events.
    Sleep Medicine 06/2011; 12(8):773-9. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past 50 years, the average sleep duration for adults in the United States has decreased while the prevalence of obesity and associated outcomes has increased. The objective of this study was to determine whether perceived insufficient sleep was associated with body mass index (BMI) in a national sample. We analyzed data from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey (N=384,541) in which respondents were asked, "During the past 30 days, for about how many days have you felt you did not get enough rest or sleep?" We divided respondents into six BMI categories and used multivariable linear regression and logistic regression analyses to assess the association between BMI categories and days of insufficient sleep after adjusting for sociodemographic variables, smoking, physical activity, and frequent mental distress. Adjusted mean days of insufficient sleep ranged from 7.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8, 8.0) days for people of normal weight to 10.5 (95% CI: 10.2, 10.9) days for those in the highest weight category (BMI≥40). Days of perceived insufficient sleep followed a linear trend across BMI categories. The likelihood of reporting ≥14 days of insufficient sleep in the previous 30 days was higher for respondents in the highest weight category than for those who were normal weight (34.9% vs. 25.2%; adjusted odds ratio=1.7 (95% CI: 1.5, 1.8]). Among U.S. adults, days of insufficient rest or sleep strongly correlated with BMI. Sleep sufficiency should be an important consideration in the assessment of the health of overweight and obese people and should be considered by developers of weight-reduction programs.
    BMC Public Health 01/2011; 11:295. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article does not have an abstract.
    American Journal of Public Health 10/2010; 100(12):2336. · 3.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

325 Citations
78.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • • Division of Population Health
      • • National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
      • • Division of Community Health
      Atlanta, MI, United States
  • 2010
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States