Guang-wei Zhong

Central South University, Ch’ang-sha-shih, Hunan, China

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Publications (9)1.06 Total impact

  • Rong Fan, Feng He, Yang Wang, Guang-wei Zhong, Yun-hui Li
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effects of a Chinese herbal formula for calming liver and suppressing yang on the protein expressions of vascular tissues in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), and to explore the mechanism of efficacy. Twenty SHRs were randomly divided into model group and treatment group. Another 10 Wistar-Kyoto rats were selected as a normal control. SHRs in the treatment group were administered with the formula for calming liver and suppressing Yang for 4 weeks. During the course of treatment, blood pressure and heart rates were monitored every week and the ethology of rats, including irritability and rotation endurance was also evaluated. After treatment, thoracic aorta was obtained and its proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and database query. The formula for calming liver and suppressing yang not only decreased the systolic blood pressure and heart rate, but also improved irritability degree and rotation endurance time of SHRs. This experiment had established the 2-DE graph of protein expressions of vascular tissues in SHRs. Compared with the normal group, the expressions of 15 proteins were down-regulated, and 12 proteins were up-regulated in vascular tissues of the model group. The formula for calming liver and suppressing yang treatment up-regulated expressions of 10 proteins in the 15 down-regulated proteins, and down-regulated 8 proteins in the 12 up-regulated proteins in vascular tissues of SHRs. After analysis, 16 obviously differentially expressed proteins were found, and 13 of them were identified. The formula for calming liver and suppressing yang can improve the ethology of SHRs. The mechanism is probably concerned with regulating the protein expressions of vascular tissues.
    Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine 06/2011; 9(6):643-50.
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    ABSTRACT: To observe the effect of Chinese herbal medicine for calming Gan (肝) and suppressing hyperactive yang (平肝潜阳, CGSHY) on arterial elasticity function and the circadian rhythm of blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension (EH). Adopting a parallel, randomized design, sixty-four patients with EH of stages I and II were randomly divided into two groups according to a random number table, with 32 in each group. The patients in the treatment group were treated with CGSHY and those in the control group were treated with Enalapril. All patients were given 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) before and after a 12-week treatment. Trough/peak (T/P) ratios of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP & DBP) of each group were calculated. The circadian rhythm of their blood pressure was observed at the same time. The changes in elasticity of the carotid artery in the patients, including stiffness parameter (β), pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), augmentation index (AI), and pulse wave velocity (PVWβ) were determined by the echo-tracking technique before and after a 12-week treatment. In the meantime, their levels of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were measured respectively. After treatment, all parameters in the 24-h ABPM and the elasticity of the carotid artery (β, Ep, AC and PVWβ) were markedly improved, the level of NO was increased, and ET-1 was decreased in both groups as compared with values before treatment (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Further, the improvements in the ratio of T/P of SBP & DBP and in the level of NO and ET-1 in the treatment group were more significant than those in the control group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in all parameters in the ABPM monitoring and the elasticity of the carotid artery, the recovery of blood pressure circadian rhythm, and the therapeutic effect of antihypertension in EH patients between the two groups (P>0.05). Chinese herbal medicine for CGSHY may lower the blood pressure smoothly and recover the circadian rhythm of blood pressure in EH patients. They may also improve the carotid elasticity of EH patients similar to that of Enalapril. The mechanism of action of Chinese herbs on EH might be related to the regulation of vascular endothelium function.
    Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine 06/2011; 17(6):414-20. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) at early stage complicated with intestinal paralysis. Sixty-eight cases of SAP were randomly divided into observation group (48 cases) and control group (20 cases). In observation group, according to the course of sickness, the early-stage subgroup (30 cases, hospitalized in 3 d) and late-stage subgroup (18 cases, hospitalized in 3-7 d) were subdivided. In control group, the conventional treatment was applied. In observation group, based on the same treatment as control group, electroacupuncture was supplemented at Zhongwan (CV 12), Zusanli (ST 36), Neiguan (PC 6), Hegu (LI 4), etc. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scores, the recovery time of intestinal paralysis and laboratory indices, complications, operation transfer rate, death rate and the admission time were compared among groups after treatment. The total effective rate was 83.3% (25/30) in early-stage subgroup, which was superior to 72.2% (13/18) in late-stage subgroup and 65.0% (13/20) in control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). In early-stage subgroup, the remission time of abdominal pain, the remission time of abdominal distention, the recovery time of borborygums, the recovery time of gas discharge, and the recovery time of defecation were all shorter significantly than those in late-stage subgroup and control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). In early-stage subgroup, APACHE II scores, the recovery time of WBC and blood/uric amylase, complications, operation transfer rate, death rate and admission time were all lower remarkably than those in late-stage subgroup and control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01); but, there were no statistical significant differences in comparison between late-stage subgroup and control group (all P > 0.05). The clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention on SAP complicated with intestinal paralysis is superior remarkably to that of conventional treatment, and the efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention at early stage is better than that at late stage.
    Zhongguo zhen jiu = Chinese acupuncture & moxibustion 02/2011; 31(2):105-9.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of acupuncture at points of The Liver and Gallbladder Meridians for treatment of migraine. Multi-central, randomized and controlled trial was used and 253 cases of migraine were divided into an acupuncture group and a western medicine group. The acupuncture group was treated with acupuncture at points of The Liver and Gallbladder Channels with Taichong (LR 3), Yang-lingquan (GB 34), Fengchi (GB 20), Ququan (LR 8) selected as main points, and the western medicine group with oral administration of Flunarizine tablets for 4 therapeutic courses. The total therapeutic effects 3 and 6 months after the treatment, the scores of various symptoms of migraine before and after treatment, and the stability of therapeutic effect in one-year following-up survey were observed in the two groups. After treatment, mean times and duration of the headache attack were significantly improved in the two groups (all P < 0.01) with the acupuncture group better than the western medicine group (P < 0.05). The total effective rates for stopping pain after treatment, 3 months and 6 months after treatment in the acupuncture group were 93.0%, 93.0% and 87.7%, respectively, which were better than 85.6%, 86.5% and 69.2% in the western medication group (all P < 0.01). One year later, the stability of the therapeutic effect in the acupuncture group was better than that in the western medicine group (P < 0.05); the adverse reaction and the compliance in the acupuncture group were significantly superior to those in the western medicine group. Acupuncture at points of The Liver and Gallbladder Meridians for treatment of migraine is safe, effective, and with stable long-term therapeutic effect.
    Zhongguo zhen jiu = Chinese acupuncture & moxibustion 05/2009; 29(4):259-63.
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    ABSTRACT: To observe the efficacy of herbs for calming liver and suppressing liver-yang in treatment of migraine patients with hyperactivity of liver-yang syndrome and to investigate its effects on the lymphocyte protein expression. This approach may lay a foundation for the further investigation of pathogenic mechanisms in migraine with hyperactive liver-yang syndrome and the curative mechanisms of calming liver and suppressing liver-yang treatment. A total of 32 migraine patients with hyperactivity of liver-yang syndrome were randomly divided into treatment group (16 cases) and control group (16 cases). The patients in the treatment group were treated with herbs for calming liver and suppressing liver-yang in accordance with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory and the patients in the control group were treated with Flunarizine Capsules for two courses of treatment. The therapeutic effects, the score of TCM symptom and the changes of headache attack were observed in both groups before and after the treatment. The side effects were also observed in both groups. The level of differential protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The herbs for calming liver and suppressing liver-yang had better effects on headache improvement than the Flunarizine Capsules (P<0.01). The cure rates in the treatment and control groups were 87.5% and 75.0% respectively. Vertigo, restlessness and tantrum, and prosopo-heat in the treatment group were also improved as compared with those in the control group (P<0.05). After treatment, the score of TCM symptom in the two groups were all decreased (P<0.01), and there was a significant difference between the treatment group and the control group (P<0.01). The herbs for calming liver and suppressing liver-yang had no side effects. The average protein spots in the blood lymphocyte of normal people, migraine patients with hyperactivity of liver-yang syndrome in the treatment group before and after the treatment were (534+/-42), (552+/-54) and (529+/-55) spots respectively. Six down-regulated protein expressions and 14 up-regulated protein expressions were obtained in the treatment group. Four strengthened protein expressions in the six down-regulated proteins and 11 low protein expressions in the 14 up-regulated proteins were also obtained after treatment. Ten of the total 12 differential protein spots were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. The functions of these proteins were involved in metabolism, energy generation, transportation, antioxidation, signal transduction and immune, etc. According to information provided by NCBI and MSDB database, there were some proteins closely related to migraine with hyperactivity of liver-yang syndrome, such as peroxiredoxin 2, heat shock protein 27 and annexin A1. Herbs for calming liver and suppressing liver-yang is effective in treating migraine, and can improve TCM symptoms. The effects on migraine patients with hyperactivity of liver-yang syndrome may be related to regulating the blood lymphocyte protein expression.
    Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine 02/2009; 7(1):25-33.
  • International Journal of Cardiology - INT J CARDIOL. 01/2009; 137.
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the effect of calming the liver and suppressing the hyperactive YANG drugs on the lymphocyte protein and clinical efficacy in the hypertension patients with hyperactivity of liver-YANG, and to identify the therapy. Twenty-six hypertension patients with hyperactivity of liver-YANG were treated by calming the liver and suppressing the hyperactive YANG drugs for 2 courses. Symptoms of Chinese medicine and blood pressure were observed, and the separated lymphocyte total protein of normal and hypertensions before and after the treatment were examined by the solid-state pH gradient 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The differences of the protein expression were analyzed by ImageMaster 2DE analysis software with two-way patterns. The total efficiency rate of calming the liver and suppressing the hyperactive YANG drugs was 88.5%, and the drugs could significantly relieve the symptoms, such as headache, dizziness, dry mouth, irritability, etc. Calming the liver and suppressing the hyperactive YANG drugs could also remarkably reduce the blood pressure,with significant different between pre-treatment and post-treatment (P<0.05). The average spots of lymphocyte gel proteins in the normal and the hypertension patients with syndrome of hyperactivity of liver-YANG before and after the treatment were 527+/-41,559+/-62, and 543+/-59, respectively. Compared with normal people, the expression of 15 proteins was down-regulated, and 10 up-regulated in the hypertension patients with syndrome of hyperactivity of liver-YANG. Compared with the pre-treatment, the expression of 12 proteins was increased in the 15 down-regulated proteins, and 6 decreased in the 10 up-regulated proteins after the treatment in the hypertension patients with syndrome of the hyperactivity of liver-YANG. Calming the liver and suppressing the hyperactive yang drugs may mildly depress the blood pressure and improve the symptoms of Chinese medicine. The effect of drugs in treating hypertension may probably be associated with regulating the expression of some proteins in lymphocytes.
    Zhong nan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Central South University. Medical sciences 12/2008; 33(11):1005-11.
  • Ying Zhang, Ze-qi Chen, Guang-wei Zhong
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the pathogenic mechanism of liver-yang hyperactivity type of hypertension and to observe the effects of Pinggan Qianyang Formula (PGQYF), a compound of traditional Chinese herbals for calming the liver and suppressing yang, so as to provide experimental evidence for new marker proteins of drug therapy. A rat model of liver-yang hyperactivity was prepared with spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) by administration of Aconiti Praeparatae Decoction. Adrenal proteins were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and database analysis. The rat model of liver-yang hyperactivity was successfully reproduced, and the PGQYF could decrease the grades of irritability, conjunctival congestion and systolic blood pressure of the rats (P<0.05, P<0.01). After analysis, twelve obviously differentially expressed proteins were found, eight of which were identified. The expression levels of isocitrate dehydrogenase and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in the untreated group were up-regulated as compared with those in the normal control group, and down-regulated in the treatment group. The expression levels of ferritin light chain, elongation factor Tu, Rho GDP disassociation inhibitor 1, flavin reductase and basic transcription factor 3 in the untreated group were down-regulated as compared with those in the normal control group, and up-regulated in the treatment group. Differentially expressed adrenal proteins in SHRs with live-yang hyperactivity are successfully identified. This approach may lay a foundation for the further investigation of pathogenic mechanisms in hypertension with liver-yang hyperactivity and the mechanisms of PGQYF treatment.
    Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine 07/2008; 6(7):729-37.
  • Yao-hui Yin, Zhen-jia Yi, Guang-wei Zhong, Jian-jun Hu
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effect of pinggan-qianyang (PGQY), a Chinese medicine, on hypothalamic proteome in the hyperthyroid rats with hyperactivity of liver-yang, and to explore its mechanism. The rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of levo-thyroxine (L-T4) and fuzi decotion. All the quantitative and qualitative changes of the protein expressions were compared among the normal group,the model group and the treatment group by proteomic techniques. The protein spots in the 3 groups were mainly displayed at the isoelectric point (pI) 3 approximately 10, and the molecular weights were 13.8 approximately 98.8 kD.Compared with the normal group, 6 spots of protein expression increased and 10 decreased in the model group. All the changed protein in the model group returned to normal level after PGQY treatment. Mass-spectrometer and bio-informatics indicated that these proteins were Prohibitin, Peroxiredoxin-6, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1, protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, predicted protein, profilin-2, peroxir doxin-II, heat shock protein-27, and annexin-A1. There are differences in the expression of hypothalamus proteins in the hyperthyroid rats with hyperactivity of liver-yang after the treatment with PGQY, and the 9 identified protein spots may be associated with the mechanism of PGQY.
    Zhong nan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Central South University. Medical sciences 06/2008; 33(5):391-8.