Haruhiko Suzuki

Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan

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Publications (11)69.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Strict long-term glycemic control has been reported to prevent or improve diabetic peripheral neuropathy, but the effects of short-term glycemic control have not been clarified in patients with type 2 diabetes. To investigate reversibility of impaired vibratory sensation by short-term glycemic control, we used the TM31 liminometer and C64 tuning fork methods to measure peripheral neuropathy. Thirty-one type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c: 10.8+/-0.4%, mean+/-S.E.M., range from 7.9% to 16.2%) were administered strict glycemic control. Vibratory sensation before and after short-term glycemic control was evaluated, and the metabolic profile including plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid (FFA) was measured. After 20.0+/-2.1 days of strict glycemic control, vibratory sensation improved significantly in both upper and lower extremities, assessed by TM31 liminometer and C64 tuning fork. Along with the improved glycemic control, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, triglyceride and FFA) was significantly improved. Thus, short-term intensive glycemic control can improve vibratory sensation, metabolic changes in glucose and lipid metabolism being the factors responsible for improved of peripheral nerve function.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 05/2008; 80(1):e16-9. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluation of a patient's pancreatic beta-cell function is important in both diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. We sought to determine beta-cell function with a single sampling of blood. Examination of fasting blood glucose (F-BG, mM) and C-peptide (F-CPR, nM) levels in seven post-islet-transplanted states of four patients revealed a linear relationship between F-BG and F-CPR. Assuming that normal subjects aged <40 years have 100% pancreatic beta-cell function, we developed the secretory units of islets in transplantation (SUIT) as an index of beta-cell function by the formula: 250 x F-CPR/(F-BG-3.43). The SUIT index was correlated with the stimulated C-peptide levels not only in islet-transplanted patients (R2 = 0.68, P < 0.05) but also in type 2 patients (R2 = 0.34, P < 0.001). Since the SUIT index can be calculated from data obtained at a single fasting blood sampling and predict the pancreatic beta-cell function, the formula may be a useful tool in clinical management of diabetes.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 01/2007; 74(3):222-6. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperglycemia frequently continues to worsen even after the diagnosis of overt diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the factors contributing to increasing glucose intolerance after onset of type 2 diabetes in Japanese subjects. Five hundred fifty newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients were classified into 3 degrees of hyperglycemia based on plasma glucose levels estimated by 75-g oral glucose tolerance test: diabetes mellitus with isolated fasting hyperglycemia (DM/IFH), DM with isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia (DM/IPH), and DM with fasting and postchallenge hyperglycemia (DM/FPH). In addition, the DM/IFH and DM/IPH groups were subdivided to clarify the determinants of fasting and postchallenge hyperglycemia. Insulin secretion was evaluated by insulinogenic index, and insulin sensitivity was evaluated by composite index of insulin sensitivity (ISI composite). The insulinogenic index in DM/IFH was highest of the 3 groups (P < .0001). The insulinogenic index in DM/IPH was higher than in DM/FPH (P < .0001). The international sensitivity index composite in DM/IPH was highest of the 3 groups (P < .05). Although impaired early-phase insulin secretion plays the crucial role in deterioration from DM/IFH to DM/FPH in Japanese subjects, impaired early-phase insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity both are factors in deterioration from DM/IPH to DM/FPH. In addition, comparison of subgroups of DM/IFH and DM/IPH shows that although decreased early-phase insulin secretion plays the more significant role in postchallenge hyperglycemia in Japanese subjects, insulin sensitivity is the more important factor in fasting hyperglycemia.
    Metabolism 01/2006; 55(1):53-8. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is a subgroup of impaired glucose regulation exhibiting an elevated fasting glucose levels without elevated 2-h glucose levels on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Diabetes mellitus with isolated fasting hyperglycemia (DM/IFH) is a similar subgroup of diabetes having higher fasting glucose levels with 2-h glucose levels within the non-diabetic range. The aim of this study is to profile the characteristics of these subgroups to estimate the factors involved in the development from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) via IFG to DM/IFH. Five hundred and sixty seven Japanese males were classified on the basis of 75 g OGTT into four groups, NGT, IFG, DM/IFH, and isolated impaired glucose tolerance (isolated IGT). Insulin secretion was evaluated by insulinogenic index, insulin sensitivity was evaluated by ISI composite, and insulin secretory patterns were compared additionally. IFG and DM/IFH subjects exhibited both lower insulin secretion and lower insulin sensitivity than NGT subjects. There was an insulin peak in NGT, IFG, and DM/IFH at 60 min, which did not occur in isolated IGT. Impaired early-phase and basal insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity both are estimated as factors in progression from NGT via IFG to DM/IFH in these subjects. IFG and DM/IFH subjects have definite fasting hyperglycemia in contrast to isolated IGT subjects, 2-h glucose levels being maintained within the non-diabetic range partly by the insulin peak at 60 min.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 11/2005; 70(1):46-52. · 2.74 Impact Factor
  • Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine 03/2005; 63 Suppl 2:406-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Rising demand for islet transplantation will lead to severe donor shortage in the near future, especially in countries where cadaveric organ donation is scarce. We undertook a successful transplantation of living-donor islets for unstable diabetes. The recipient was a 27-year-old woman who had had brittle, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus for 12 years. The donor, who was a healthy 56-year-old woman and mother of the recipient, underwent a distal pancreatectomy. After isolation, 408 114 islet equivalents were transplanted immediately. The transplants functioned immediately and the recipient became insulin-independent 22 days after the operation. The donor had no complications and both women showed healthy glucose tolerance. Transplantation of living-donor islets from the distal pancreas can be sufficient to reverse brittle diabetes.
    The Lancet 01/2005; 365(9471):1642-4. · 39.21 Impact Factor
  • Mitsuo Fukushima, Haruhiko Suzuki, Yutaka Seino
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined the contribution of insulin secretion and insulin resistance to glucose intolerance in Japanese. Some indices of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity based on the results of OGTT were used. The decline of insulin secretion capacity was significant throughout the development of glucose intolerance from NGT via IGT to DM. Decreased insulinogenic indices were conspicuous when it is compared with other types of diabetes. Slight impairment of insulin secretion has begun in subjects with NGT. The progression from NGT via isolated IGT to isolated post-challenge hyperglycemia was considered mostly due to the deterioration of early-phase insulin secretion. It is summarized that decreased insulin secretion capacity takes a definite role in the development from NGT to type 2 diabetes in Japan.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 01/2005; 66 Suppl 1:S37-43. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have established that impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) patients with fasting hyperglycemia (IGT/FH: fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level 6.1-7.0 mmol/l and 2 h PG level of 7.8-11.1 mmol/l) exhibit higher insulin resistance than those with isolated IGT (FPG level <6.1 mmol/l and 2 h PG level of 7.8-11.1 mmol/l), but the association with microalbuminuria has not been determined. Here, we evaluate the prevalence of microalbuminuria in non-diabetic Japanese males 20-70 years of age. The subjects were classified into four groups based on the results of OGTT: normal glucose tolerance (NGT: n=71), impaired fasting glucose (IFG: n=24), isolated IGT (n=36), and IGT/FH (n=23). A urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) from 30 to 300 microg/mg creatinine was counted as microalbuminuria. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was higher in subjects with IGT/FH than in subjects with isolated IGT (26% versus 14%). Logistic regression analysis showed microalbuminuria to be more significantly associated with IGT/FH (OR=3.82, 95% CI 1.09-13.36) than with isolated IGT (OR=1.75, 95% CI 0.50-6.17). While insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in isolated IGT was not significantly different from that in NGT, insulin resistance in IGT/FH was significantly higher (P<0.01). Regression analysis of ACR in IGT showed a significant correlation with insulin resistance (P=0.012). Accordingly, microalbuminuria is more strongly associated with IGT/FH than with isolated IGT, most likely due to the higher insulin resistance.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 07/2004; 64(3):213-9. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia (IPH), defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level <7.0 mmol/l and 2-h plasma glucose (PG) level >/=11.1 mmol/l, is a subtype of early-stage diabetes. This study evaluates the metabolic profiles of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in IPH to clarify the factors responsible for development of this form of type 2 diabetes. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 231 Japanese men aged 20-70 years. The subjects were classified into the following three groups, based on the results of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT): 1) normal glucose tolerance (NGT), defined as FPG level <6.1 mmol/l and 2-h PG level <7.8 mmol/l (n = 89); 2) impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), defined as FPG level <7.0 mmol/l and 2-h PG level of 7.8-11.1 mmol/l (n = 94); and 3) IPH (n = 48). We compared the three groups for insulin secretion (insulinogenic index) and insulin sensitivity (index of insulin resistance using homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR]). The insulinogenic index in IPH was the lowest of the three groups (P < 0.001 versus NGT). The HOMA-IR in the IGT and IPH groups were significantly higher than in the NGT group (P < 0.001), but both were similar. By linear regression analysis, the insulinogenic index rather than fasting insulin or HOMA-IR was the more significant factor in the 2-h PG level in IGT and IPH. Subjects with IPH exhibited distinctly impaired early-phase insulin secretion and only mild insulin resistance, indicating that reduced insulin secretion is the primary determinant of deterioration from NGT to IGT and IPH in development of type 2 diabetes in these subjects.
    Diabetes Care 04/2003; 26(4):1211-5. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether non-obese Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with porphyromonas gingivalis infection have atherosclerotic vascular diseases. A total of 134 non-obese Japanese type 2 diabetic patients (96 men and 38 women, aged 36 to 84 years, body mass index [BMI] 20.1 to 26.9 kg/m(2)) were studied. In conjunction with BMI, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting glucose, and serum lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol) were measured. LDL cholesterol was calculated using the Friedewald formula. Using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound scan, we measured intimal medial thickness (IMT) in plaque-free segments of bilateral common carotid arteries, and the mean of IMT in 2 vessels was used for the analysis. Furthermore, we calculated the degree of stenosis in plaque segments of bilateral common carotid arteries. The degree of carotid atherosclerosis was expressed as a percentage ratio between the area of plaque and that of the lumen using the formula (Lumen Area Residual - Lumen Area)/Lumem Area x 100. Both the areas were automatically measured by the system on a frozen transverse scanning plane at the site of maximal narrowing. When 2 or more plaques were present in the vessel, only that causing the greatest degree of stenosis was considered for analysis. Values represent mean+/-SEM unless otherwise stated. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer against porphyromonas gingivalis was 245 +/- 65 (mean +/- 2 SD) in nondiabetic healthy subjects. In contrast, there was a wide variation in IgG titer against porphyromonas gingivalis in type 2 diabetic patients studied (range, 16 to 26,800). Thus, we classified our type 2 diabetic patients into 2 subpopulations according to the value of mean +/- 2 SD (= 310) of nondiabetic healthy subjects: one with high IgG titer against porphyromonas gingivalis (>310) (1,422 +/- 408) and the other with normal IgG titer against porphyromonas gingivalis (<310) (152 +/- 10, P =.002). The populations did not differ with respect to age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, HbA(1c), serum triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol levels. Although the mean IMT in plaque-free segments was not different between the 2 groups (0.73 +/-0.03 v 0.68 +/- 0.02 mm, P =.098), the degree of stenosis in plaque segments was significantly higher in the high IgG titer group (12.0% +/- 2.2%) than in normal one (5.5% +/- 1.4%, P =.009). From these results, it can be concluded that porphyromonas gingivalis infection, although still a subclinical infection, is associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease in non-obese Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.
    Metabolism 02/2003; 52(2):142-5. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by both impaired beta-cell function and increasing insulin resistance. To clarify the roles of them in developing type 2 diabetes, we evaluated insulin resistance by HOMA-IR and insulin secretion by HOMA beta-cell in 453 Japanese subjects whose fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA(1c) levels were within normal range. HOMA beta-cell was found to decrease in the over 30 years groups, while HOMA-IR increased with body mass index (BMI). To analyze the reserve capacity of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, the 67 of them, who underwent a standard oral glucose tolerance test and were diagnosed with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), were divided into four degrees of BMI age-adjusted to 50 years. They were compared for insulinogenic index and ISI composite proposed by Matsuda and DeFronzo across the range of BMI. ISI composite was significantly less in the highest BMI group, while insulin secretion did not increase in the higher BMI groups. The subjects with higher BMI had remarkably lower insulinogenic indices than those with lower BMI. These data suggest that insulin secretory reserve is insufficient to compensate for increased insulin resistance in Japanese people with NGT at about 50 years of age.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 02/2003; 59(1):71-7. · 2.74 Impact Factor