Gilles Hejblum

Unité Inserm U1077, Caen, Lower Normandy, France

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Publications (41)152.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Assessing the accuracy of influenza epidemic periods determined by statistical models is important to improve the performance of algorithms used in real-time syndromic surveillance systems. This is a difficult problem to address in the absence of a reliable gold standard. The objective of this study is to establish an expert-based determination of the start and the end of influenza epidemics in France. A three-round international web-based Delphi survey was proposed to 288 eligible influenza experts. Fifty-seven (20%) experts completed the three-rounds of the study. The experts were invited to indicate the starting and the ending week of influenza epidemics, on 32 time-series graphs of influenza seasons drawn using data from the French Sentinelles Network (Influenza-like illness incidence rates) and virological data from the WHO-FluNet. Twenty-six of 32 time-series graphs proposed corresponded to each of the French influenza seasons observed between 1985 and 2011. Six influenza seasons were proposed twice at each round to measure variation among expert responses. We obtained consensual results for 88% (23/26) of the epidemic periods. In two or three rounds (depending on the season) answers gathered around modes, and the internal control demonstrated a good reproducibility of the answers. Virological data did not appear to have a significant impact on the answers or the level of consensus, except for a season with a major mismatch between virological and incidence data timings. Thanks to this international web-based Delphi survey, we obtained reproducible, stable and consensual results for the majority of the French influenza epidemic curves analysed. The detailed curves together with the estimates from the Delphi study could be a helpful tool for assessing the performance of statistical outbreak detection methods, in order to optimize them.
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 12/2013; 13(1):138. · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    B Guidet, G Hejblum, G Joynt
    European Journal of Intensive Care Medicine 08/2013; · 5.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Should an emerging infectious disease outbreak or an environmental disaster occur, the collection of epidemiological data must start as soon as possible after the event's onset. Questionnaires are usually built de novo for each event, resulting in substantially delayed epidemiological responses that are detrimental to the understanding and control of the event considered. Moreover, the public health and/or academic institution databases constructed with responses to different questionnaires are usually difficult to merge, impairing necessary collaborations. We aimed to show that e-commerce concepts and software tools can be readily adapted to enable rapid collection of data after an infectious disease outbreak or environmental disaster. Here, the 'customers' are the epidemiologists, who fill their shopping 'baskets' with standardised questions. Methods: For each epidemiological field, a catalogue of questions is constituted by identifying the relevant variables based on a review of the published literature on similar circumstances. Each question is tagged with information on its source papers. Epidemiologists can then tailor their own questionnaires by choosing appropriate questions from this catalogue. The software immediately provides them with ready-to-use forms and online questionnaires. All databases constituted by the different EpiBasket users are interoperable, because the corresponding questionnaires are derived from the same corpus of questions. Results: A proof-of-concept prototype was developed for Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) surveys, which is one of the fields of the epidemiological investigation frequently explored during, or after, an outbreak or environmental disaster. The catalogue of questions was initiated from a review of the KAP studies conducted during or after the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic. Conclusion: Rapid collection of standardised data after an outbreak or environmental disaster can be facilitated by transposing the e-commerce paradigm to epidemiology, taking advantage of the powerful software tools already available.
    Emerging Health Threats Journal 01/2013; 6:19748.
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    ABSTRACT: Mathematical modeling in epidemiology (MME) is being used increasingly. However, there are many uncertainties in terms of definitions, uses and quality features of MME. To delineate the current status of these models, a 10-item questionnaire on MME was devised. Proposed via an anonymous internet-based survey, the questionnaire was completed by 189 scientists who had published in the domain of MME. A small minority (18%) of respondents claimed to have in mind a concise definition of MME. Some techniques were identified by the researchers as characterizing MME (e.g. Markov models), while others-at the same level of sophistication in terms of mathematics-were not (e.g. Cox regression). The researchers' opinions were also contrasted about the potential applications of MME, perceived as highly relevant for providing insight into complex mechanisms and less relevant for identifying causal factors. The quality criteria were those of good science and were not related to the size and the nature of the public health problems addressed. This study shows that perceptions on the nature, uses and quality criteria of MME are contrasted, even among the very community of published authors in this domain. Nevertheless, MME is an emerging discipline in epidemiology and this study underlines that it is associated with specific areas of application and methods. The development of this discipline is likely to deserve a framework providing recommendations and guidance at various steps of the studies, from design to report.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(1):e16531. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chest x-rays (CXRs) are the main imaging tool in intensive care units (ICUs). CXRs also are associated with concerns inherent to their use, considering both healthcare organization and patient perspectives. In recent years, several studies have focussed on the feasibility of lowering the number of bedside CXRs performed in the ICU. Such a decrease may result from two independent and complementary processes: a raw reduction of CXRs due to the elimination of unnecessary investigations, and replacement of the CXR by an alternative technique. The goal of this review is to outline emblematic examples corresponding to these two processes. The first part of the review concerns the accumulation of evidence-based data for abandoning daily routine CXRs in mechanically ventilated patients and adopting an on-demand prescription strategy. The second part of the review addresses the use of alternative techniques to CXRs. This part begins with the presentation of ultrasonography or capnography combined with epigastric auscultation for ensuring the correct position of enteral feeding tubes. Ultrasonography is then also presented as an alternative to CXR for diagnosing and monitoring pneumothoraces, as well as a valuable post-procedural technique after central venous catheter insertion. The combination of the emblematic examples presented in this review supports an integrated global approach for decreasing the number of CXRs ordered in the ICU.
    Annals of intensive care. 01/2011; 1(1):4.
  • K. Atsou, G. Hejblum, C. Chouaid
    Value in Health 01/2011; 14(7). · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    Kokuvi Atsou, Christos Chouaid, Gilles Hejblum
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predicted to become a major cause of death worldwide. Studies on the variability in the estimates of key epidemiological parameters of COPD may contribute to better assessment of the burden of this disease and to helpful guidance for future research and public policies. In the present study, we examined differences in the main epidemiological characteristics of COPD derived from studies across countries of the European Union, focusing on prevalence, severity, frequency of exacerbations and mortality, as well as on differences between the studies' methods. This systematic review was based on a search for the relevant literature in the Science Citation Index database via the Web of Science and on COPD mortality rates issued from national statistics. Analysis was finally based on 65 articles and Eurostat COPD mortality data for 21 European countries. Epidemiological characteristics of COPD varied widely from country to country. For example, prevalence estimates ranged between 2.1% and 26.1%, depending on the country, the age group and the methods used. Likewise, COPD mortality rates ranged from 7.2 to 36.1 per 10(5) inhabitants. The methods used to estimate these epidemiological parameters were highly variable in terms of the definition of COPD, severity scales, methods of investigation and target populations. Nevertheless, to a large extent, several recent international guidelines or research initiatives, such as GOLD, BOLD or PLATINO, have boosted a substantial standardization of methodology in data collection and have resulted in the availability of more comparable epidemiological estimates across countries. On the basis of such standardization, severity estimates as well as prevalence estimates present much less variation across countries. The contribution of these recent guidelines and initiatives is outlined, as are the problems remaining in arriving at more accurate COPD epidemiological estimates across European countries. The accuracy of COPD epidemiological parameters is important for guiding decision making with regard to preventive measures, interventions and patient management in various health care systems. Therefore, the recent initiatives for standardizing data collection should be enhanced to result in COPD epidemiological estimates of improved quality. Moreover, establishing international guidelines for reporting research on COPD may also constitute a major contribution.
    BMC Medicine 01/2011; 9:7. · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    Kokuvi Atsou, Christos Chouaid, Gilles Hejblum
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    ABSTRACT: The medico-economic impact of smoking cessation considering a smoking patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is poorly documented. Here, considering a COPD smoking patient, the specific burden of continuous smoking was estimated, as well as the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation. A multi-state Markov model adopting society's perspective was developed. Simulated cohorts of English COPD patients who are active smokers (all severity stages combined or patients with the same initial severity stage) were compared to identical cohorts of patients who quit smoking at cohort initialization. Life expectancy, quality adjusted life-years (QALY), disease-related costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: £/QALY) were estimated, considering smoking cessation programs with various possible scenarios of success rates and costs. Sensitivity analyses included the variation of model key parameters. At the horizon of a smoking COPD patient's remaining lifetime, smoking cessation at cohort intitialization, relapses being allowed as observed in practice, would result in gains (mean) of 1.27 life-years and 0.68 QALY, and induce savings of -1824 £/patient in the disease-related costs. The corresponding ICER was -2686 £/QALY. Smoking cessation resulted in 0.72, 0.69, 0.64 and 0.42 QALY respectively gained per mild, moderate, severe, and very severe COPD patient, but was nevertheless cost-effective for mild to severe COPD patients in most scenarios, even when hypothesizing expensive smoking cessation intervention programmes associated with low success rates. Considering a ten-year time horizon, the burden of continuous smoking in English COPD patients was estimated to cost a total of 1657 M£ while 452516 QALY would be simultaneously lost. The study results are a useful support for the setting of smoking cessation programmes specifically targeted to COPD patients.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(9):e24870. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    Gilles Hejblum, Bertrand Guidet
    Radiology 09/2010; 256(3):1013-4. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Few data are available on prescriber adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment guidelines. In particular, excessively long treatment carries a risk of avoidable adverse effects and represents a waste of healthcare resources. We examined factors potentially associated with excessively long treatment. We reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed with TB in 2004 in the eastern Paris region. Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with excessively long treatment were identified by logistic regression analyses. Based on contemporary guidelines, excessively long treatment was defined as more than 6 months of a four-drug regimen for thoracic TB with full sensitive strains, and more than 12 months for patients with extrathoracic TB. Analyses concerned 478 patients with a median age of 36.0 +/- 13.5 years, of whom 48% were living in precarious conditions (i.e. poor living conditions and/or no health insurance), 80% were born abroad, and 17% were HIV-seropositive. TB was restricted to the chest in 279 patients (isolated pulmonary, pleuropulmonary, and isolated pleural TB in 245, 13, and 21 patients, respectively), exclusively extrathoracic in 115 patients, and mixed in the remaining 84 patients. Treatment was prescribed by a chest specialist in 211 cases (44.1%) and 295 patients (61.7%) were managed in a single institution. The treatment duration complied with contemporary guidelines in 316 cases (66.1%) and was excessively long in 162 cases (33.9%). The median duration of excessively long treatment was 313 days (IQR: 272-412). In multivariate analysis, isolated thoracic TB, previous TB, HIV infection, a prescriber other than a chest specialist, and management in more than one healthcare center during treatment were independently associated with excessively lengthy treatment. One-third of TB patients received excessively long treatment, reflecting inadequate awareness of management guidelines or unwillingness to implement them.
    BMC Public Health 01/2010; 10:495. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, especially those of a global nature, require rapid epidemiological analysis and information dissemination. The final products of those activities usually comprise internal memoranda and briefs within public health authorities and original research published in peer-reviewed journals. Using the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic as an example, we conducted a comprehensive time-stratified review of the published literature to describe the different types of epidemiological outputs. We identified and analyzed all published articles on the epidemiology of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong or Toronto. The analysis was stratified by study design, research domain, data collection, and analytical technique. We compared the SARS-case and matched-control non-SARS articles published according to the timeline of submission, acceptance, and publication. The impact factors of the publishing journals were examined according to the time of publication of SARS articles, and the numbers of citations received by SARS-case and matched-control articles submitted during and after the epidemic were compared. Descriptive, analytical, theoretical, and experimental epidemiology concerned, respectively, 54%, 30%, 11%, and 6% of the studies. Only 22% of the studies were submitted, 8% accepted, and 7% published during the epidemic. The submission-to-acceptance and acceptance-to-publication intervals of the SARS articles submitted during the epidemic period were significantly shorter than the corresponding intervals of matched-control non-SARS articles published in the same journal issues (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). The differences of median submission-to-acceptance intervals and median acceptance-to-publication intervals between SARS articles and their corresponding control articles were 106.5 d (95% confidence interval [CI] 55.0-140.1) and 63.5 d (95% CI 18.0-94.1), respectively. The median numbers of citations of the SARS articles submitted during the epidemic and over the 2 y thereafter were 17 (interquartile range [IQR] 8.0-52.0) and 8 (IQR 3.2-21.8), respectively, significantly higher than the median numbers of control article citations (15, IQR 8.5-16.5, p<0.05, and 7, IQR 3.0-12.0, p<0.01, respectively). A majority of the epidemiological articles on SARS were submitted after the epidemic had ended, although the corresponding studies had relevance to public health authorities during the epidemic. To minimize the lag between research and the exigency of public health practice in the future, researchers should consider adopting common, predefined protocols and ready-to-use instruments to improve timeliness, and thus, relevance, in addition to standardizing comparability across studies. To facilitate information dissemination, journal managers should reengineer their fast-track channels, which should be adapted to the purpose of an emerging outbreak, taking into account the requirement of high standards of quality for scientific journals and competition with other online resources.
    PLoS Medicine 01/2010; 7(5):e1000272. · 15.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Present guidelines recommend routine daily chest radiographs for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units. However, some units use an on-demand strategy, in which chest radiographs are done only if warranted by the patient's clinical status. By comparison between routine and on-demand strategies, we aimed to establish which strategy was more efficient and effective for optimum patient care. In a cluster-randomised, open-label crossover study, we randomly assigned 21 intensive care units at 18 hospitals in France to use a routine or an on-demand strategy for prescription of chest radiographs during the first of two treatment periods. Units used the alternative strategy in the second period. Each treatment period lasted for the time taken for enrolment and study of 20 consecutive patients per intensive care unit; patients were monitored until discharge from the unit or for up to 30 days' mechanical ventilation, whichever was first. Units enrolled 967 patients, but 118 were excluded because they had been receiving mechanical ventilation for less than 2 days. The primary outcome measure was the mean number of chest radiographs per patient-day of mechanical ventilation. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00893672. 11 intensive care units were randomly allocated to use a routine strategy to order chest radiographs in the first treatment period, and 10 units to use an on-demand strategy. Overall, 424 patients had 4607 routine chest radiographs (mean per patient-day of mechanical ventilation 1.09, 95% CI 1.05-1.14), and 425 had 3148 on-demand chest radiographs (mean 0.75, 0.67-0.83), which corresponded to a reduction of 32% (95% CI 25-38) with the on-demand strategy (p<0.0001). Our results strongly support adoption of an on-demand strategy in preference to a routine strategy to decrease use of chest radiographs in mechanically ventilated patients without a reduction in patients' quality of care or safety. Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (Direction Régionale de la Recherche Clinique Ile de France).
    The Lancet 11/2009; 374(9702):1687-93. · 39.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: France was one of the few European countries without a national tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcome monitoring system until 2007. To examine TB management and treatment outcomes in the eastern Paris region, and to identify patient- and management-dependent factors affecting treatment outcome. This retrospective study focused on all cases of microbiologically confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases diagnosed in 2004 in the eastern Paris region, one of the areas of France with the highest frequency of TB. Treatment outcomes of 629 identified cases (males 69.6%, median age 37 years, socio-economically disadvantaged 44%, foreign-born 78%) were as follows: treatment success 70.1% (95%CI 66.5-73.7), treatment interruption 4.9% (95%CI 3.2-6.6), loss to follow-up 15.0% (95%CI 12.2-17.8), death 5.7% (95%CI 3.9-7.9), transfers 4.3% (95%CI 3.5-5.1). Non-completion of treatment was associated with sputum smear positivity, injection drug use, non-adherence and irregular follow-up in univariate analysis, and with irregular follow-up and non-adherence in multivariate analysis. Duration of TB treatment and follow-up medical visits were not applied as recommended in more than a third of cases. The treatment success rate observed in this study (70.1%) is below the World Health Organization target of 85%, and requires the implementation and evaluation of interventions to increase treatment success rates.
    The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease: the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 08/2009; 13(7):881-7. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • M Wargon, B Guidet, T D Hoang, G Hejblum
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to predict patient visits to emergency departments (ED) is crucial for designing strategies aimed at avoiding overcrowding. A good working knowledge of the mathematical models used to predict patient volume and of their results is therefore essential. Articles retrieved by a Medline search were reviewed for studies designed to predict patient attendance at ED or walk-in clinics. Nine studies were identified. Most of the models used to predict patient volume were either linear regression models including calendar variables or time series models. These models explained 31-75% of patient-volume variability. Although the day of the week had the strongest effect, this variable explained only part of the variability. Other causes of this variability are to be defined. However, the performance of the models was good, with errors ranging from 4.2% to 14.4%. Adding meteorological data failed to improve model performance. The mathematical methods developed to predict ED visits have a low rate of error, but the prediction of daily patient visits should be used carefully and therefore does not allow day-to-day adjustments of staff. ED directors or managers should be aware of the model limitations. These models should certainly be used on a larger scale to assess future needs.
    Emergency Medicine Journal 07/2009; 26(6):395-9. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For the prevention of chemotherapy-induced febrile aplasia, a single injection of pegfilgrastim per cycle has the same efficacy as six to ten injections of conventional granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, there are few data on the economic impact of pegfilgrastim use, especially in the context of small-cell lung cancer. This retrospective study involved 31 patients and 129 treatment cycles (32 with pegfilgrastim and 97 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)). We estimated the direct costs for preventing and managing febrile aplasia from the payer's perspective and also conducted a willingness-to-pay study with 100 healthy subjects, in order to estimate how highly a single-jab strategy was valued relative to multiple injections. The costs per cycle were respectively 1743 euros+/- 837 euros and 1466 euros +/- 836 euros for the pegfilgrastim and G-CSF strategies (p < 0.001). The excess cost of the pegfilgrastim strategy was partly compensated for by the perceived value of the single-jab strategy: 88% of interviewees would prefer the pegfilgrastim strategy; 16% would be willing to pay all the excess cost (277 euros) and 67% would be willing to pay half the excess cost. In this willingness-to-pay survey, the excess cost associated with pegfilgrastim relative to other G-CSF-based prophylactic strategies is partly offset by the perceived convenience of a single injection.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 05/2009; 25(6):1455-60. · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to review the economics of treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We systematically analysed the cost effectiveness of treatments for the different stages of NSCLC, with particular emphasis on more recently approved agents. Numerous economic analyses in NSCLC have been conducted, with a variety of methods and in a number of countries. In patients with localized disease, adjuvant chemotherapy appears to have greater cost effectiveness than observation; however, there are few published data. In locally advanced disease, combined modalities (chemotherapy, surgery and/or radiotherapy) are probably cost effective, but high-quality economic analyses are lacking. In advanced NSCLC, third-generation chemotherapies used in the first-line setting can be administered with acceptable incremental cost effectiveness. In the second-line setting, new agents (docetaxel, pemetrexed and erlotinib) have acceptable cost effectiveness. The lack of cost-utility analyses for elderly patients and patients with a poor prognosis rules out firm conclusions. This review suggests that most therapies for NSCLC are cost effective when the patient has a good performance status, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio under USD 50,000 per life-year gained in the majority of cases.
    PharmacoEconomics 02/2009; 27(2):113-25. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The literature on preoperative smoking cessation indicates that smoking patients are more likely to have postoperative complications. However, the economic implications of such complications are unclear. In particular, the balance between the cost of a preoperative intervention for smoking cessation (PISC) and the benefit resulting from the potential decrease in hospitalization costs is not known. Only one previous study, a randomized trial involving smokers scheduled for hip or knee replacement surgery, provides sufficient data to simulate the hospital course of patients subjected or not subjected to a PISC. We used a multistate Markov-type model and official French hospital costs for 2008 to simulate this situation. The cost-benefit analysis adopted the payer's perspective. The mean benefit, corresponding to the decrease in the cost of the hospital stay for a reference case patient having followed a PISC, was estimated at 313 euros, with a corresponding mean cost of the PISC estimated at 196 euros. Therefore, the PISC was associated with a cost saving of 117 euros per patient. The results were most sensitive to the cost of ICU care as a proxy for cost of smoking-related complications, and to the relative risk of complication between patients with and without a PISC. Under the conditions simulated by this cost-benefit model, potential modest cost savings may accrue with implementation of an institution-based smoking cessation program through reduced total hospitalization costs that exceed the cost of the intervention.
    Chest 09/2008; 135(2):477-83. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strategies for ordering bedside chest radiographs (CXRs) have substantial logistic and financial consequences in the ICU. Many of the indications for CXRs in the ICU are controversial, such as the ordering of daily routine CXRs for intubated patients. The opinions of intensivists about ordering CXRs have not been reported. Comparing these opinions to established guidelines and identifying situations where opinions diverge in the absence of guidelines are of considerable interest. We asked 190 intensivists from 34 ICUs in the area of Paris, France, to anonymously complete a 29-item questionnaire about their opinions regarding the ordering of CXRs; each item described a clinical scenario. Of the 29 scenarios, 10 dealt with the placement of medical devices, 8 with the presence of medical devices, and 11 with other clinical situations. The study was based on a Delphi process deployed over the Internet through an original software application. Three Delphi rounds were run between January and March 2006, using the same questionnaire. Detailed feedback for the answers given during the previous round was supplied to each intensivist solicited for updating his answers. Eighty-two intensivists from 32 ICUs completed the study. A consensus emerged that routine CXRs were necessary for eight scenarios and unnecessary for two scenarios. The study also shed light on items without a consensus. In particular, 75% of intensivists (58% on the first round) did not support obtaining daily routine CXRs in intubated patients. The study underlines situations in which intensivists do not support the guidelines and outlines recommendations likely to be followed in clinical practice.
    Chest 06/2008; 133(5):1107-12. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The population of oldest old patients requiring intensive care is expected to increase in the next years and the first triage usually occurs in the emergency department. To identify the factors for triage and discharge from intensive care unit (ICU), a specific list of indications of potential ICU admission for this population is needed.MethodsA panel of six physicians, including two intensivists, two emergency physicians and two gerontologists, with expertise determined a list of situations requiring intensive care for elderly patients from the North-American published guidelines. This list was sent to 30 emergency physicians who were asked to rate the appropriateness of each indications of the list on a numerical scale ranging from 1 extremely inappropriate, to 9 extremely appropriate using a Delphi method. The same round was carried out to review their initial rating and to assign new rating to each indication being provided the mean, median, range and frequency distribution of the ratings of the previous round. Such a round was repeated until an acceptable level of agreement was obtained for each indication of the list.ResultsThree round of Delphi were useful to determine 79 items. Forty-six items were determined as criteria of situation requiring intensive care (six with a high level of agreement 40 with an intermediate level of agreement). Two items are determined as no indication for intensive care. Thirty-one items were scored indecision for intensive care.Conclusion The number of Delphi round used to obtain an agreement shows the difficulties to determine the criteria of potential ICU admission for oldest old patients. However, this list should be useful to identify the factors linked to the effective admission of these patients in ICU.
    Journal Européen des Urgences 06/2008; 21(2):56-63.
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    ABSTRACT: Mathematical modelling of infectious diseases has gradually become part of public health decision-making in recent years. However, the developing status of modelling in epidemiology and its relationship with other relevant scientific approaches have never been assessed quantitatively. Herein, using antibiotic resistance as a case study, 60 published models were analysed. Their interactions with other scientific fields are reported and their citation impact evaluated, as well as temporal trends. The yearly number of antibiotic resistance modelling publications increased significantly between 1990 and 2006. This rise cannot be explained by the surge of interest in resistance phenomena alone. Moreover, modelling articles are, on average, among the most frequently cited third of articles from the journal in which they were published. The results of this analysis, which might be applicable to other emerging public health problems, demonstrate the growing interest in mathematical modelling approaches to evaluate antibiotic resistance.
    Epidemiology and Infection 04/2008; 136(3):289-98. · 2.87 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

478 Citations
156 Downloads
2k Views
152.72 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2013
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 1993–2013
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2011
    • Polytech Paris-UPMC
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • Hôpital Bichat - Claude-Bernard (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Nord Val de Seine)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Hôpital Saint-Antoine (Hôpitaux Universitaires Est Parisien)
      • Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Hôpitaux Universitaires La Pitié salpêtrière - Charles Foix
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France