Stefania Bandinelli

Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze, Florens, Tuscany, Italy

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Publications (300)2179.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The hormone klotho, encoded by the gene klotho, is primarily expressed in the kidney and choroid plexus of the brain. Higher klotho concentrations and certain genetic variants of klotho have been linked to better cognition; however, it is unknown whether klotho relates prospectively to slower cognitive decline in older adults. Plasma klotho was measured in 833 participants aged 55 or older without dementia enrolled in InCHIANTI, a prospective cohort study comprising Italian adults. Cognition was measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail-Making Tests A and B (Trails A and Trails B) at enrollment and at 3 and 6 years after enrollment. We assessed whether klotho concentrations measured at the 3-year visit related to cognition and cognitive decline. Each additional natural logarithm of klotho (pg/mL) was associated with 35% lower risk of meaningful decline in MMSE, defined as decline exceeding three points (relative risk = 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.45, 0.95; p value = .02), and 0.75-point smaller average 3-year decline (baseline to 3-year visit) in MMSE (95% confidence interval 0.02, 1.48; p value = .04). No statistically significant associations were found between klotho and declining Trails A (relative risk = 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.75, 1.32; p value = .97) and B (relative risk = 1.02; 95% confidence interval 0.84, 1.24; p value = .82). Higher plasma klotho concentrations were associated with lower risk of meaningful decline and smaller average decline in MMSE. We did not observe such findings with Trails A and B, perhaps because they test executive function and motor skills, whereas MMSE measures global cognition. Future studies should investigate mechanisms through which klotho may affect domain-specific cognitive changes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 08/2015; DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv140 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined whether physical activity in early adulthood, late midlife, and old age as well as cumulative physical activity history are associated with changes in physical functioning and mortality in old age. Data are from participants aged 65 years or older enrolled in the InCHIANTI study who were followed up from 1998-2000 to 2007-2008 (n = 1,149). At baseline, participants recalled their physical activity levels at ages 20-40, 40-60, and in the previous year, and they were categorized as physically inactive, moderately active, and physically active. Physical performance was assessed with the Short Physical Performance Battery and self-reported mobility disability was evaluated at the 3-, 6- and 9-year follow-up. Mortality follow-up was assessed until the end of 2010. Physical inactivity at baseline was associated with greater decline in Short Physical Performance Battery score (mean 9-year change: -2.72, 95% CI: -3.08, -2.35 vs -0.98, 95% -1.57, -0.39) and greater rate of incident mobility disability (hazard ratio 4.66, 95% CI 1.14-19.07) and mortality (hazard ratio 2.18, 95% CI 1.01-4.70) compared to physically active participants at baseline. Being physically active throughout adulthood was associated with smaller decline in physical performance as well as with lower risk of incident mobility disability and premature death compared with those who had been less active during their adult life. Higher cumulative physical activity over the life course was associated with less decline in physical performance and reduced rate of incident mobility disability and mortality in older ages. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 08/2015; DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv111 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The frailty phenotype (FP) proposed by Fried and colleagues (Fried LP, Tangen CM, Walston J, et al.; Cardiovascular Health Study Collaborative Research Group. Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001;56:M146-M156.) requires the administration of performance tests (gait speed, handgrip strength) not always feasible in routine clinical practice. Furthermore, the discriminative capacity of the instrument has been rarely investigated. Aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminative capacity of the FP and compare it with a modified version including only anamnestic information. Data are from 890 participants of the InCHIANTI study without impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) at baseline (mean age 74 years, women 55%). Frailty was defined by (a) the presence of ≥3 criteria of the FP, and (b) having ≥2 criteria of an anamnestic FP (AFP), not including gait speed and handgrip strength. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were used to evaluate the discriminative capacity of both definitions for incident disability (ie, loss of at least one ADL), incidence of "accelerated" disability (loss of >2 ADL) over a 6-year follow-up, and 5-years mortality. FP and AFP yielded a frailty prevalence of 6.4% and 6.5%, respectively; only 32 patients were considered frail by both indices (kappa: .53). For incident disability, FP showed sensitivity = .194, specificity = .963, PPV = .400, and NPV = .903. Similarly, AFP had sensitivity = .129, specificity = .949, PPV = .245, and NPV = .894. Consistent results were found for accelerated disability and mortality. In our sample, both FP and AFP showed low sensitivity in identifying older people who would die or develop disability, but they could well discriminate people who would not experience adverse outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 08/2015; DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv096 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies point out the role of the age-related decline of anabolic hormones, especially testosterone, in the onset of "anemia of aging". Some of testosterone erythropoietic activities are mediated by Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-1, which also seems to have independent erythropoietic effects. However, the association between IGF-1, anemia and hemoglobin (Hb) has been poorly investigated in older population. We used data from a representative sample of 953 subjects ≥65 yrs of the InCHIANTI Study, not on GH or erythropoietin therapy and without hematological malignancy and cancer. Anemia was defined according to the WHO criteria by Hb level ≤13 g/dL in men and ≤12 g/dL in women. Backward multiple regression analyses including age, IGF Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3, testosterone, comorbidities, inflammatory markers, anemia-related measures were used to address the relationship between IGF-1 and Hb and between IGF-1 and anemia in the two sexes. 46/410 men (11.2%) and 71/543 women (13.0%) were defined as anemic. After adjustment for age, anemic men (100±54 vs 130±56, p<0.001) and women (89.1±48 vs 110±52, p=0.001) exhibited lower IGF-1 levels than non-anemic counterpart. IGF-1 levels were independently and negatively associated with anemia in men (β±SE=-0.0005±0.0002, p=0.04) but not in women (β±SE=-0.0002±0.0002, p=0.40). In both men (β±SE=0.002±0.001, p=0.03) and women (β±SE=0.002± 0.0009, p=0.03) IGF-1 levels were independently and positively associated with Hb levels. In older men, but not in women, IGF-1 levels are negatively associated with anemia. IGF-1 levels are independent and positive determinants of Hb concentration in both sexes.
    Endocrine Practice 07/2015; DOI:10.4158/EP14100.OR · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associations with obesity traits have been identified through genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. 32 BMI- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated SNPs were genotyped and genetic risk scores (GRS) calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n=68,317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multi-variable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort, followed by inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR; b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P=0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567), and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjusted WHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Human Molecular Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv186 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clonal proliferation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) is driven by somatic mutations in JAK2, CALR or MPL, but the contribution of inherited factors is poorly characterized. Using a three-stage genome-wide association study of 3,437 MPN cases and 10,083 controls, we identify two SNPs with genome-wide significance in JAK2(V617F)-negative MPN: rs12339666 (JAK2; meta-analysis P=1.27 × 10(-10)) and rs2201862 (MECOM; meta-analysis P=1.96 × 10(-9)). Two additional SNPs, rs2736100 (TERT) and rs9376092 (HBS1L/MYB), achieve genome-wide significance when including JAK2(V617F)-positive cases. rs9376092 has a stronger effect in JAK2(V617F)-negative cases with CALR and/or MPL mutations (Breslow-Day P=4.5 × 10(-7)), whereas in JAK2(V617F)-positive cases rs9376092 associates with essential thrombocythemia (ET) rather than polycythemia vera (allelic χ(2) P=7.3 × 10(-7)). Reduced MYB expression, previously linked to development of an ET-like disease in model systems, associates with rs9376092 in normal myeloid cells. These findings demonstrate that multiple germline variants predispose to MPN and link constitutional differences in MYB expression to disease phenotype.
    Nature Communications 04/2015; 2015(6):6691. DOI:10.1038/ncomms7691 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Frailty, an age-related state of increased vulnerability, is associated with a higher risk of multiple adverse events. Studies have suggested that the quality of dietary intake may affect the development of frailty. We hypothesized that frailty in older subjects would be associated with dietary total polyphenols (DTP) intake and its biomarker, urinary total polyphenols (UTP). The Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) Study is a prospective cohort study set in the Chianti area (Italy). We used data at baseline from 811 participants aged 65 years and older. UTP was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay after solid-phase extraction. DTP was estimated using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire and our own polyphenol database. The frailty, prefrailty, and nonfrailty states were defined according to the Fried and colleagues' criteria. Multinomial logistic regressions adjusted for potential confounders were used to assess the relationship between polyphenols and frailty. Both DTP and UTP concentrations progressively decrease from nonfrail to frail participants. Participants in the highest UTP tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile were significantly less likely to be both frail (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36 [0.14-0.88], p = .025) and prefrail (OR = 0.64 [0.42-0.98], p = .038). Exhaustion and slowness were the only individual frailty criteria significantly associated with UTP tertiles. No significant association was observed between frailty and DTP, after adjustment for covariates. High concentrations of UTP were associated with lower prevalence of frailty and prefrailty in an older community-dwelling population. A polyphenol-rich diet may protect against frailty in older persons. Our findings should be confirmed in longitudinal studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 04/2015; DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv026 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To investigate the association between total urinary polyphenols (TUPs) and total dietary polyphenols (TDPs) and cognitive decline in an older population.DesignThe Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) study, a cohort study with 3 years of follow-up.SettingTuscany, Italy.ParticipantsIndividuals without dementia aged 65 and older (N = 652).MeasurementsTUP and TDP concentrations were analyzed at baseline using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and a validated food frequency questionnaire, respectively. Cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail-Making Test (TMT) at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up. Substantial cognitive decline was defined as a reduction in MMSE score of three or more points and an increase of at least 29 seconds on the TMT Part A (TMT-A) and 68 seconds on the TMT Part B (TMT-B) (the worst 10% of the distribution of decline) or as test discontinued because of multiple mistakes on the TMT A and B at follow-up.ResultsHigher TUP levels were associated with lower risk of substantial cognitive decline on the MMSE (odds ratio (OR) comparing extreme tertiles = 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.34–0.85, P-trend = .008) and on the TMT-A (OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.28–0.96, P-trend = .03), but not on TMT-B in a logistic regression model that adjusted for baseline cognitive score and potential confounding factors. TDP did not affect the development of substantial cognitive decline in either test.Conclusion High concentrations of polyphenols, a nutritional biomarker of polyphenol intake, were associated with lower risk of substantial cognitive decline in an older population studied over a 3-year period, suggesting a protective effect against cognitive impairment.
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 04/2015; 63(5). DOI:10.1111/jgs.13379 · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    Nature Communications 03/2015; 6:6542. DOI:10.1038/ncomms7542 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The hormone klotho is encoded by aging-suppressor gene klotho and has multiple roles, including regulating mineral (calcium and phosphate) homeostasis. Vitamin D also regulates mineral homeostasis and upregulates klotho expression. Klotho positively relates to longevity, upper-extremity strength, and reduced disability in older adults; however, it is unknown whether circulating klotho relates to lower-extremity physical performance or whether the relation of vitamin D with physical performance is mediated by klotho. Klotho and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were measured in 860 participants aged ≥ 55 years in Invecchiare in Chianti, "Aging in Chianti" (InCHIANTI), a prospective cohort study comprising Italian adults. Lower-extremity physical performance was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery, a summary score of balance, chair stand ability, and walking speed. Weighted estimating equations related plasma klotho and serum 25(OH)D concentrations measured at one visit to Short Physical Performance Battery measured longitudinally at multiple visits. Each additional natural log of klotho (pg/mL) was associated with 0.47 higher average Short Physical Performance Battery scores (95% confidence interval: 0.08 to 0.86, p value = .02) after adjustment for covariates, including 25(OH)D. Each natural log of 25(OH)D (ng/mL) was associated with 0.61 higher average Short Physical Performance Battery scores (95% confidence interval: 0.35 to 0.88, p value < .001) after adjustment for covariates, a result that changed little after adjustment for klotho. Plasma klotho and 25(OH)D both positively related to lower-extremity physical performance. However, the findings did not support the hypothesis that klotho mediates the relation of 25(OH)D with physical performance. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv017 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mobility is an essential aspect of everyday life and enables autonomy and participation. Although many risk factors for mobility loss have been previously described, their relative importance and independent contributions to the long-term risk of losing mobility have not been well defined. This study is based on 1,013 men and women aged ≥65 years enrolled in 1998-2000 and followed for 9 years through 2007-2008 in the population-based InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti, aging in the Chianti area) study. We considered 44 different measures assessed at baseline to explore six subsystems: (i) central nervous system, (ii) peripheral nervous system, (iii) muscles, (iv) bone and joints, (v) energy production and delivery, and (vi) perceptual system. The outcome was incident mobility loss defined as self-report of inability to walk 400 m or climb and descend 10 steps without help from another person. Random survival forest analysis was used to rank the candidate predictors by their importance. The most important physiological markers predicting mobility loss that emerged from the random survival forest modeling were older age among women (81-95 vs 65-68 years, hazard ratio [HR] 9.60 [95% CI 3.35, 27.50]), weaker ankle dorsiflexion strength (lowest vs highest quintile, HR 5.25 [95% CI 2.35, 11.72]), low hip flexion range of motion (lowest vs highest quintile, HR 2.30 [95% CI 1.20, 4.41]), presence of primitive reflexes (yes vs no, HR 1.47 [95% CI 1.03, 2.09]), and tremor (yes vs no, HR 1.91 [95% CI 1.18, 3.07]). Prevention of mobility loss with aging should focus on prevention and treatment of neuromuscular impairments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 03/2015; 70(5). DOI:10.1093/gerona/glv004 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%-9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension.
    PLoS Genetics 03/2015; 11(3):e1005035. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005035 · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: About 30% of people over 65 are subject to at least one unintentional fall a year. Fall prevention protocols and interventions can decrease the number of falls. To be effective, a prevention strategy requires a prior step to evaluate the fall risk of the subjects. Despite extensive research, existing assessment tools for fall risk have been insufficient for predicting falls. The goal of this study is to present a novel web-based fall-risk assessment tool (FRAT-up) and to evaluate its accuracy in predicting falls, within a context of community-dwelling persons aged 65 and up. FRAT-up is based on the assumption that a subject's fall risk is given by the contribution of their exposure to each of the known fall-risk factors. Many scientific studies have investigated the relationship between falls and risk factors. The majority of these studies adopted statistical approaches, usually providing quantitative information such as odds ratios. FRAT-up exploits these numerical results to compute how each single factor contributes to the overall fall risk. FRAT-up is based on a formal ontology that enlists a number of known risk factors, together with quantitative findings in terms of odds ratios. From such information, an automatic algorithm generates a rule-based probabilistic logic program, that is, a set of rules for each risk factor. The rule-based program takes the health profile of the subject (in terms of exposure to the risk factors) and computes the fall risk. A Web-based interface allows users to input health profiles and to visualize the risk assessment for the given subject. FRAT-up has been evaluated on the InCHIANTI Study dataset, a representative population-based study of older persons living in the Chianti area (Tuscany, Italy). We compared reported falls with predicted ones and computed performance indicators. The obtained area under curve of the receiver operating characteristic was 0.642 (95% CI 0.614-0.669), while the Brier score was 0.174. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test indicated statistical significance of miscalibration. FRAT-up is a web-based tool for evaluating the fall risk of people aged 65 or up living in the community. Validation results of fall risks computed by FRAT-up show that its performance is comparable to externally validated state-of-the-art tools. A prototype is freely available through a web-based interface. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01331512 (The InChianti Follow-Up Study); http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01331512 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UDrrRuaR).
    Journal of Medical Internet Research 02/2015; 17(2):e41. DOI:10.2196/jmir.4064 · 4.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis
    Nature 02/2015; 518(7538). DOI:10.1038/nature14177 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 x 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.
    Nature 02/2015; 518(7538-7538):187-96. DOI:10.1038/nature14132 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. We evaluated interactions between genetic variants and fatty acid intakes for circulating alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). We conducted meta-analyses (N to 11668) evaluating interactions between dietary fatty acids and genetic variants (rs174538 and rs174548 in FADS1 (fatty acid desaturase 1), rs7435 in AGPAT3 (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate), rs4985167 in PDXDC1 (pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain-containing 1), rs780094 in GCKR (glucokinase regulatory protein) and rs3734398 in ELOVL2 (fatty acid elongase 2)). Stratification by measurement compartment (plasma vs. erthyrocyte) revealed compartment-specific interactions between FADS1 rs174538 and rs174548 and dietary ALA and linoleic acid for DHA and DPA. Our findings reinforce earlier reports that genetically-based differences in circulating fatty acids may be partially due to differences in the conversion of fatty acid precursors. Further, fatty acids measurement compartment may modify gene-diet relationships, and considering compartment may improve the detection of gene-fatty acids interactions for circulating fatty acid outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 01/2015; 59(7). DOI:10.1002/mnfr.201400734 · 4.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake. We examined associations between habitual sleep duration, body mass index (BMI), and macronutrient intake and assessed whether CLOCK variants modify these associations. We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations of sleep duration and BMI and macronutrient intake as percentages of total energy as well as interactions with CLOCK variants from 9 cohort studies including up to 14,906 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium. We observed a significant association between sleep duration and lower BMI (β ± SE = 0.16 ± 0.04, P < 0.0001) in the overall sample; however, associations between sleep duration and relative macronutrient intake were evident in age- and sex-stratified analyses only. We observed a significant association between sleep duration and lower saturated fatty acid intake in younger (aged 20-64 y) adults (men: 0.11 ± 0.06%, P = 0.03; women: 0.10 ± 0.05%, P = 0.04) and with lower carbohydrate (-0.31 ± 0.12%, P < 0.01), higher total fat (0.18 ± 0.09%, P = 0.05), and higher PUFA (0.05 ± 0.02%, P = 0.02) intakes in older (aged 65-80 y) women. In addition, the following 2 nominally significant interactions were observed: between sleep duration and rs12649507 on PUFA intake and between sleep duration and rs6858749 on protein intake. Our results indicate that longer habitual sleep duration is associated with lower BMI and age- and sex-specific favorable dietary behaviors. Differences in the relative intake of specific macronutrients associated with short sleep duration could, at least in part, explain previously reported associations between short sleep duration and chronic metabolic abnormalities. In addition, the influence of obesity-associated CLOCK variants on the association between sleep duration and macronutrient intake suggests that longer habitual sleep duration could ameliorate the genetic predisposition to obesity via a favorable dietary profile. Trials related to this study were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005133 (Cardiovascular Health Study), NCT00005121 (Framingham Offspring Study), NCT01331512 [Invecchiare in Chianti (Aging in the Chianti Area) study], NCT00289237 (Inter99), and NCT00005487 (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/2015; 101(1):135-43. DOI:10.3945/ajcn.114.095026 · 6.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma fibrinogen is an acute phase protein playing an important role in the blood coagulation cascade having strong associations with smoking, alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a variety of gene regions associated with elevated plasma fibrinogen concentrations. However, little is yet known about how associations between environmental factors and fibrinogen might be modified by genetic variation. Therefore, we conducted large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide interaction studies to identify possible interactions of genetic variants and smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI on fibrinogen concentration. The present study included 80,607 subjects of European ancestry from 22 studies. Genome-wide interaction analyses were performed separately in each study for about 2.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the 22 autosomal chromosomes. For each SNP and risk factor, we performed a linear regression under an additive genetic model including an interaction term between SNP and risk factor. Interaction estimates were meta-analysed using a fixed-effects model. No genome-wide significant interaction with smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI was observed in the meta-analyses. The most suggestive interaction was found for smoking and rs10519203, located in the LOC123688 region on chromosome 15, with a p value of 6.2×10-8. This large genome-wide interaction study including 80,607 participants found no strong evidence of interaction between genetic variants and smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI on fibrinogen concentrations. Further studies are needed to yield deeper insight in the interplay between environmental factors and gene variants on the regulation of fibrinogen concentrations.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e111156. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0111156 · 3.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

13k Citations
2,179.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2015
    • Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
  • 2007–2014
    • University of Florence
      • Dipartimento di Chirurgia e Medicina Traslazionale (DCMT)
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
    • University of Washington Seattle
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2013
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2012
    • McGill University
      • Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2004–2011
    • Università degli studi di Parma
      • Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
      Parma, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
    • University of Bologna
      • Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine DIMES
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 2010
    • University Hospital of Parma
      Parma, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009
    • Università degli Studi di Perugia
      • Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
      Perugia, Umbria, Italy
    • Case Western Reserve University
      • School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • 2006–2009
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2005–2009
    • Second University of Naples
      Caserta, Campania, Italy
    • INRIM Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
    • University of Naples Federico II
      • Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology
      Napoli, Campania, Italy
    • Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2003–2009
    • National Research Council
      Oristany, Sardinia, Italy
  • 2008
    • Università degli Studi G. d'Annunzio Chieti e Pescara
      Chieta, Abruzzo, Italy
  • 2003–2007
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry (LEDB)
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1999–2006
    • INRCA Istituto Nazionale di Ricovero e Cura per Anziani
      Ancona, The Marches, Italy