Yoshihiko Soga

Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama, Japan

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Publications (43)103.97 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The detection of infective endocarditis (IE) of oral origin has been previously discussed. However, there are few reports confirming this infection using molecular biological techniques. We herein describe the case of a 67-year-old man who developed IE. Blood culture samples and strains obtained from the gingival and buccal mucosa showed 100% identity to Enterococcus faecalis JCM 5803 on sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed the same pattern for these samples, thus confirming the identity of E. faecalis isolates in the blood and oral mucosa. Our observations provide novel information regarding the level of identity between IE pathogens and oral bacteria.
    Internal Medicine 01/2015; 54(14):1809-14. DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.54.3223 · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We encountered a 74-year-old male patient with tongue laceration after convulsive seizures under intensive care. The tongue showed severe swelling, and the right ventral surface had been lacerated by his isolated and pointed right lower canine. Our university hospital has established a perioperative management center, and is promoting interprofessional collaboration, including dentists, in perioperative management. Dentists collaborating in the perioperative management center took dental impressions, with the support of anesthesiologists who opened the patient's jaw under propofol sedation, to produce a mouth protector. By raising the patient's bite, the completed mouth protector prevented the isolated tooth from contacting the tongue and protected the lacerated wound. Use of the mouth protector prevented the lacerated tongue from coming into contact with the pointed tooth, and the tongue healed gradually. These findings underscore that interprofessional collaboration including dentists can improve the quality of medical care.
    Acta medica Okayama 12/2014; 68(6):375-8. · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Supportive Care Cancer 09/2014; 22(12). DOI:10.1007/s00520-014-2432-8 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hematology-oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients are at risk for oral complications which may cause significant morbidity and a potential risk of mortality. This emphasizes the importance of basic oral care prior to, during and following chemotherapy/HSCT. While scientific evidence is available to support some of the clinical practices used to manage the oral complications, expert opinion is needed to shape the current optimal protocols.
    Supportive Care Cancer 09/2014; 23(1). DOI:10.1007/s00520-014-2378-x · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We recently reported frequent detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on the oral mucosa during the period of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and suggested an association between oral mucositis and antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were frequently detected, and the oral cavity may be a reservoir of the gene mediating methicillin resistance, mecA. Here, we examined the frequency of mecA carriers in patients undergoing HCT. Fifty-nine patients (male (M) = 37, female (F) = 22, 47.3 ± 11.0 years) receiving HCT were enrolled in this study. Buccal swab samples were obtained four times from day -7 to day +20 (once/week), and mecA was detected by PCR. Fifty-two subjects without systemic disease, who completed dental treatment, especially periodontal treatment (M = 21, F = 31, 55.4 ± 14.2 years), were also enrolled as controls and checked for mecA on the oral mucosa. Seventy-six percent (45/59) of the HCT patients carried mecA at least once in the study period (days -7 to +20), while no control subjects had mecA. The frequency of mecA carriers was 19.2 % from days -7 to -1, while it was significantly increased on days +7 to +13 and +14 to +20, with frequencies of 60.9 and 63.2 %, respectively (P < 0.01, ANOVA). mecA was detected in oral mucosa of patients undergoing HCT. The high detection frequency of staphylococci resistant to penicillin and beta-lactams in our recent report was supported.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 02/2014; 22(6). DOI:10.1007/s00520-014-2151-1 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) was reported previously to be involved in allergic inflammation with cytotoxic activity. On the other hand, recent studies showed that ECP did not induce cell death but inhibited the growth of cancer-derived cells. Our previous study indicated that human ECP enhanced differentiation of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and stress fiber formation in Balb/c 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, while the effects of human ECP on human fibroblasts are unknown. The present study was performed to determine the effects of human ECP on cytokine expression in human fibroblasts by protein array. The effects of recombinant human ECP (rhECP) on normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were examined by assaying cell growth. Furthermore, cytokine expression of NHDF stimulated by ECP, which could influence cell growth, was evaluated by protein array. ECP was not cytotoxic but enhanced the growth of NHDF. The peak rhECP concentration that enhanced the cell counts by 1.56-fold was 100 ng/mL, which was significantly different from cultures without ECP stimulation (ANOVA/ Scheffe's test, P < 0.05). Array analyses indicated that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), neutrophil-activating peptide (NAP)-2, and neurotrophin (NT)-3 were significantly upregulated in NHDF stimulated with 100 ng/mL ECP compared to those without stimulation. ECP is not cytotoxic but enhances the growth of NHDF. CNTF, NAP-2, and NT-3 were suggested to be involved in enhancing the growth of NHDF. These findings will contribute to determination of the role of ECP in allergic inflammation.
    Asian Pacific journal of allergy and immunology / launched by the Allergy and Immunology Society of Thailand 12/2013; 31(4):271-6. DOI:10.12932/AP0287.31.4.2013 · 1.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Occlusal support may be an important factor affecting nutritional support after major surgery. This report presents a patient who gained body weight after receiving a new prosthesis. The patient was an 82-year-old man with thoracic esophageal carcinoma. He did not have occlusal support because of multiple caries lesions. His body weight slowly increased after surgery, but almost stopped in the period of 54 to 68 days after surgery. After treatment with dentures (day 72 postsurgery), body weight gain was observed again, although his medical treatment had not changed. An appropriate prosthesis could contribute to perioperative nutrition support and may lead to earlier recovery after surgery.
    The International journal of prosthodontics 11/2013; 26(6):574-6. DOI:10.11607/ijp.3622 · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    Supportive Care in Cancer 08/2013; 21(11). DOI:10.1007/s00520-013-1943-z · 2.50 Impact Factor
  • Nihon Shishubyo Gakkai Kaishi (Journal of the Japanese Society of Periodontology) 01/2013; 55(3):262-268. DOI:10.2329/perio.55.262
  • Supportive Care in Cancer 09/2012; 21(2). DOI:10.1007/s00520-012-1602-9 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to review the literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of cytokines and growth factor agents for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis induced by cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society for Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO). The body of evidence for each intervention, in each cancer treatment setting, was assigned an evidence level. Based on the evidence level, one of the following three guideline determinations was possible: Recommendation, Suggestion, No guideline possible. RESULTS: Sixty-four clinical studies across 11 interventions were evaluated. A recommendation was made for the use of recombinant human KGF-1 (palifermin) at a dose of 60 μg/kg per day for 3 days prior to conditioning treatment and for 3 days post-transplant for prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies. A suggestion was made against using granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor mouthwash for the prevention of oral mucositis in the setting of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. No guideline was possible for any other cytokine or growth factor agents due to inconclusive evidence. CONCLUSIONS: Of the cytokine and growth factor agents studied for oral mucositis, the evidence only supports use of palifermin in the specific population listed above. Additional well-designed research is needed on other cytokine and growth factor interventions and in other cancer treatment settings.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 09/2012; 21(1). DOI:10.1007/s00520-012-1594-5 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of leukemia-associated gingival enlargement based on a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) with typical gingival enlargement. Uniquely, this patient was well enough to allow full periodontal examination and incisional gingival biopsy to be performed both before and after chemotherapy. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese woman with AML-M4 showing gingival enlargement. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingiva and bacterial counts in the periodontal pockets were examined before and after chemotherapy. The results were as follows: (1) infiltration of myelomonocytic blasts in enlarged gingiva; (2) resolution of gingival enlargement with complete remission of AML by anticancer chemotherapy; and (3) the numbers of bacteria in the periodontal pockets were not high and were not altered before or after chemotherapy. In patients with AML-M4, remarkable mucosal enlargement is not generally observed in the body except in the gingiva. We hypothesized that antigens derived from periodontal bacteria, even if they are not present in large numbers, could act as chemoattractants for myelomonocytic leukemic cells.
    Odontology 11/2011; 100(2):254-7. DOI:10.1007/s10266-011-0051-0 · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are frequently isolated from blood cultures of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. Generally, the use of central venous catheters is recognized as a significant risk factor for CoNS infection, while the impact of CoNS infection from oral ulcerative mucositis, which occurs frequently in HCT, may be underestimated. Here, we examined the bacteria on the buccal mucosa after HCT. Sixty-one patients were examined for bacteria on the buccal mucosa routinely once a week from 1 week before to 3 weeks after allogeneic HCT. Subjects were divided into groups with short and long periods of antibiotic use, and differences in bacterial substitution were evaluated. The relationships between type of HCT (conventional HCT or RIST) and bacterial substitution were also evaluated. The changes in detection frequencies of CoNS and α-streptococci from before to 3 weeks after HCT were significant (P < 0.05, χ (2) test): 14.5-53.3% and 92.7-53.1%, respectively. Significant bacterial substitution of CoNS for streptococci was observed in the long-term antibiotic use group (P < 0.05, χ (2) test), but also occurred in cases with short-term or no antibiotic use. No relationships between type of HCT (conventional HCT or RIST) were observed. Bacterial substitution of CoNS for streptococci occurred frequently on the buccal mucosa after HCT. In addition to antibiotic use, environmental factors may be involved in bacterial substitution. It is important to consider the presence of oral mucositis in CoNS infection after HCT.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 07/2011; 19(7):995-1000. DOI:10.1007/s00520-010-0923-9 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic low-grade infection has been suggested to be associated with metabolic disorder such as diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this important association is largely unknown. The only clue established so far is that many subjects exhibit elevated levels of C-reactive protein as measured by highly sensitive assay. Here, we hypothesized that adipocyte-macrophage interaction plays a key role in amplifying such low grade infection to the level of influencing metabolic disorders. The presence of macrophages in abdominal adipose tissues was investigated by immunohistochemistry. To see whether molecules associated with acute phase protein, LPS signaling, and persistent recruitment of monocytes, are produced at higher amounts in adipocytes co-cultured with macrophages stimulated with low concentration of LPS (1 ng/ml), we measured serum amyloid A (SAA), LPS binding protein (LBP), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and RANTES levels in culture supernatant of co-cultures. Lastly, we investigated in vivo effect of low-grade LPS infusion on the production of these molecules using obese model mice. The macrophages were certainly identified in abdominal adipose tissues. Investigated molecules, especially LBP, SAA, and RANTES were produced at higher amounts in co-cultures stimulated with LPS compared with the cells without LPS. The ob/ob, and high-fat diet-induced obesity mice produced higher amounts of LBP, SAA, and RANTES one day after LPS infusion (1 ng/ml/g body weight) compared with ob/- and normal-fat fed control mice. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrated macrophages, and their interaction with low endotoxin stimulation appear to play an important role in amplifying and maintaining LPS-induced low-grade inflammation.
    Innate Immunity 01/2011; 18(1):164-70. DOI:10.1177/1753425910393370 · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Methanobrevibacter oralis is an archaeal species frequently isolated from sites of severe periodontitis. However, its pathogenic roles remain unclear. Here, we aimed to isolate group II chaperonin from M. oralis and examine its antigenicity. The genes encoding two chaperonin subunits (Cpn-1 and Cpn-2) were cloned from M. oralis using polymerase chain reaction and genome walking procedures. Recombinant proteins Cpn-1 and Cpn-2 were generated, and the reactivities of sera from patients with periodontitis were examined by Western immunoblotting. The open reading frames of Cpn-1 and Cpn-2 genes consisted of 1641 and 1614 base pairs, respectively. Putative ATP-binding domains conserved among the chaperonin family were observed in both genes. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two genes showed 28.8-40.0% identity to each of the subunits of human CCT (CCT1-8). Thirty and 29 of 36 patients' sera reacted with the recombinant Cpn-1 and recombinant Cpn-2, respectively. Western immunoblotting using antiserum against human CCT subunits indicated that anti-CCT3 and anti-CCT8 antibodies recognized recombinant Cpn-1. In addition, anti-CCT1, CCT3, CCT6, and CCT8 antibodies recognized an antigen of approximately 60 kDa in M. oralis. The results suggested that the chaperonin subunits of M. oralis were antigenic molecules that were recognized by periodontitis patients and that may cross-react with human chaperonin CCT.
    04/2010; 25(2):112-22. DOI:10.1111/j.2041-1014.2009.00548.x
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    ABSTRACT: Oral health care providers may discover systemic diseases incidentally from signs observed in the oral cavity. Here, we report a case in which oral health care providers in a hospital discovered a patient with strongly suspected bullous pemphigoid (BP), which is a relatively rare but important disease, in a ward. The patient was a 78-year-old Japanese woman admitted to our hospital because of severe Alzheimer's disease. We discovered recurrent ulcers in the oral mucosa and skin when performing oral care in her ward. Biopsy could not be performed safely because of involuntary biting. We performed blood tests for anti-BP180-NC16a antibody, which is autoantibody specific for BP. The patient had a very high anti-BP180-NC16a antibody titre. We consulted a dermatologist regarding her clinical course and the clinical features of the oral mucosa and skin along with blood test results. BP was very strongly suspected. In cases in which oral health care providers suspect their patients may have BP, appropriate examination and provision of information to the doctor are important. Oral health care providers should have knowledge about systemic diseases, the signs of which appear in oral cavity to avoid missing important systemic diseases.
    International Journal of Dental Hygiene 03/2010; 9(2):159-62. DOI:10.1111/j.1601-5037.2010.00448.x · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oral mucositis is a common symptomatic complication associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). We use simple strategies aimed to reduce oral mucositis by keeping the oral cavity clean and moist. Here, we report on the progress of oral care and the changes in the degree of oral mucositis. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the effects of our strategies on the prevalence and the severity of oral mucositis. Fifty-three consecutive patients from 2003 to 2006 administered with conventional allogeneic HCT were enrolled in this study. The degree of oral mucositis was evaluated daily in all patients. Our oral care program was divided into two periods: "examination and trial period (2003 and 2004)" and "intensive oral care period (2005 and 2006)." In the latter, an oral care regimen was carried out systematically by a multidisciplinary team. Using our oral care strategies, the prevalence of ulcerative oral mucositis was decreased significantly. The rate was reduced from 76% (10 of 13) of patients with ulcerative oral mucositis in 2003 to only 20% (3 of 15) in 2006. Our pilot study suggests that oral mucositis in HCT patients can be alleviated by simple strategies aimed at keeping the oral cavity clean and moist.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 02/2010; 19(2):303-7. DOI:10.1007/s00520-010-1002-y · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The commercial saliva substitute Oralbalance has been reported to alleviate symptoms of postradiotherapy xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients. Oralbalance may also be effective for xerostomia in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with high-dose chemotherapy and total-body irradiation. However, HCT patients are in a severely compromised condition, and saliva substitute must not promote infection. We reported previously that Oralbalance has antimicrobial effects against microbial species detected during HCT in vitro. This study was performed to determine the in vivo effects of Oralbalance on oral mucosal total bacterial counts in patients undergoing HCT. A total of 18 neutropenic patients undergoing HCT were enrolled in this study. Before and after 1 week of Oralbalance use, bacterial samples were obtained from patients by wiping an area of varphi1 cm on the buccal mucosa with sterilized cotton swabs. Total bacterial counts of the obtained samples were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. As controls, bacterial samples were also obtained from ten healthy subjects, and total bacterial counts were examined. No significant increase in bacterial count was observed with use of Oralbalance. None of the patients showed bacterial counts above the range found in healthy controls after using Oralbalance. In neutropenic patients undergoing HCT, Oralbalance did not increase the total counts of oral mucosal bacteria beyond the range found in healthy controls. Oral care using Oralbalance may alleviate the symptoms induced by hyposalivation without promoting infection.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 12/2009; 18(3):395-8. DOI:10.1007/s00520-009-0789-x · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Severe oral mucositis induced by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is associated with intolerable pain and risk of systemic bacteremia infection. Differences between conventional HCT and reduced-intensity regimens for allogeneic HCT (RIST) may influence the occurrence and severity of oral mucositis. Here, we evaluated oral mucositis in patients undergoing RIST and compared the results with those in conventional allogeneic HCT patients to facilitate predictive measures for mucositis. A total of 127 consecutive patients undergoing HCT (conventional, 63; RIST, 64) were included in this study. Severity of oral mucositis during HCT period was evaluated daily. Differences in severity of mucositis among HCT types were analyzed. Use of morphine to control pain due to oral mucositis was evaluated in each HCT method. The severity of oral mucositis was reduced in patients undergoing RIST. Worsening of oral mucositis was delayed in patients receiving RIST. Use of morphine to control pain due to oral mucositis was significantly decreased in patients undergoing RIST compared with those receiving conventional allogeneic HCT. The severity of oral mucositis was reduced and the peak day of oral mucositis was delayed in RIST patients compared with those receiving conventional HCT.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 05/2009; 18(1):115-9. DOI:10.1007/s00520-009-0637-z · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A genome-association study is a powerful tool for analyzing small gene effects in complex diseases such as chronic periodontitis (CP), although the cost of analysis is prohibitive. We designed a study using the DNA pooling method, which could be a breakthrough in lowering such costs. This study was conducted to assess the genetic association in severe CP in a Japanese population. We adopted a DNA pooling method by genotyping 454 densely spaced microsatellite (MS) markers in chromosome 19 as a pilot study, with the possibility of future use in a whole-genome study. This can reduce the high cost and technical burden, which is generally unavoidable in a genomic association study. Pooled DNA samples from 300 case subjects, 300 control subjects, and 200 systemically healthy subjects were screened by genotyping MS markers. The case-control association in the candidate region was analyzed by individual typing of MS and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The single MS marker allele 17 of 1902G31 was isolated in association with severe CP (P = 0.0012 for 2 x 2; P <0.046 for 2 x m, where m refers to the number of polymorphic alleles observed in a population). No other SNP or MS polymorphism hypothesized to affect biologic functions in the critical region was found in the linkage disequilibrium block analysis. We efficiently isolated the susceptible locus for severe CP in chromosome 19 and identified a useful marker to evaluate the risk for disease. This approach can be applied to a whole-genome study in severe CP.
    Journal of Periodontology 05/2009; 80(4):663-71. DOI:10.1902/jop.2009.080516 · 2.57 Impact Factor