P Fuentes

Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France

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Publications (145)254.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Acute mediastinitis is a life-threatening complication (20 to 40 % of mortality) secondary to oropharyngeal abscesses, neck infections or oesophageal leak spreading into the mediastium. Early diagnosis and optimal therapeutic approach are crucial for patient survival. CT scanning of the cervical and thoracic area is a useful tool for diagnosis and follow-up. Treatment is based on broad-spectrum antibiotherapy, adequate surgery, mediastinal drainage, and treatment of possible organ failure. There is no surgical standardized attitude. Mini-invasive approach could be satisfactory when prompt diagnosis is established and the thoracic drainage is effective. Repeated postoperative CT scanning and close clinical and laboratory monitoring could make an additional thoracotomy a second-line procedure.
    Revue de Pneumologie Clinique 02/2010; 66(1):71-80. · 0.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Le vie di accesso toracoaddominali sono quelle di elezione per la chirurgia aortica, esofagea e in alcuni settori della chirurgia generale in elezione o in urgenza. Una buona conoscenza anatomica del diaframma e della regione toracoaddominale consente di adattare al meglio il gesto chirurgico alle circostanze. Dalla scelta dello spazio intercostale, dal tipo di dissezione e dalla sezione del diaframma dipendono la semplicità di esposizione e, in parte, il decorso generale dell’intervento. In queste vie di accesso la branca posteriore del nervo frenico viene ampiamente esposta e una buona conoscenza dell’anatomia del diaframma ne consente una buona sezione e riparazione. La via toracoaddominale può essere scelta in due situazioni. Si può trattare di un’indicazione nel settore della chirurgia in elezione, sia come prima scelta per avere una buona esposizione, sia in seconda battuta per ampliare verso il torace un accesso addominale o verso l’addome un accesso toracico. Può inoltre essere scelta come accesso in regime di urgenza dettata da alcune circostanze particolari (patologia toracica traumatica chiusa o aperta, ferita toracoaddominale penetrante) in cui si preveda di dover ampliare una laparotomia verso il torace o, al contrario, un accesso toracico verso l’addome. In queste situazioni il chirurgo deve poter esporre e controllare tutti gli elementi vascolari degli organi sovra- e sotto diaframmatici in un unico campo operatorio. Questi accessi toracoaddominali non sono di esclusivo interesse dei chirurghi toracici o vascolari, ma di tutti i chirurghi che praticano la chirurgia generale in elezione o in urgenza. Nella prima parte di questo capitolo vengono approfondite le conoscenze anatomiche necessarie alla realizzazione di questi accessi. In una seconda parte viene descritta la tecnica chirurgica in dettaglio a seconda delle circostanze riscontate, con dettagli riguardanti la toracotomia posterolaterale con frenotomia, la toracofreno-laparatomia destra o sinistra, la toracolaparotomia o sternolaparotomia. Il testo è illustrato da schemi per una comprensione ottimale.
    EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche Torace. 01/2010; 14(1):1–12.
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    ABSTRACT: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon infection caused by microorganism called "fl esh eating bacteria". It remains a life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate. Its location to the chest wall is exceptional. Herein, we report the case of a 39 years old female, without comorbidity, presenting a necrotizing fascitiis of the chest wall complicating an empyema. We described the surgical management with a three-steps procedure: antibiotherapy- debridement, Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) and delayed surgical reconstruction .
    Annales De Chirurgie Plastique Esthetique - ANN CHIR PLAST ESTHET. 01/2010; 55(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Acute mediastinitis is a life-threatening complication (20 to 40 % of mortality) secondary to oropharyngeal abscesses, neck infections or oesophageal leak spreading into the mediastium. Early diagnosis and optimal therapeutic approach are crucial for patient survival. CT scanning of the cervical and thoracic area is a useful tool for diagnosis and follow-up. Treatment is based on broad-spectrum antibiotherapy, adequate surgery, mediastinal drainage, and treatment of possible organ failure. There is no surgical standardized attitude. Mini-invasive approach could be satisfactory when prompt diagnosis is established and the thoracic drainage is effective. Repeated postoperative CT scanning and close clinical and laboratory monitoring could make an additional thoracotomy a second-line procedure.
    Revue De Pneumologie Clinique - REV PNEUMOL CLIN. 01/2010; 66(1):71-80.
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    ABSTRACT: To report on the experience with radical surgery, with emphasis on the long-term outcome, for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) at a single institution. From our prospective database over a 17-year period, we reviewed 83 consecutive patients undergoing radical surgery for MPM in a multimodality programme. The long-term overall survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 83 patients (65 males, median age: 60 years) underwent an extra-pleural pneumonectomy (EPP) with a curative intent. Epitheliod MPM was the most frequent (82%) cause. A right-sided disease was present in half of the cases (n=42). The International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) stage of the disease was 2 in 36%, 3 in 45% and 4 in 9% of the cases. Preoperative chemotherapy consisting of a doublet cisplatin-pemetrexed (mean of three cycles) was offered to 10 patients (12%). Postoperative therapies, either chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were given in 25 patients (30%). The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 4.8% and 10.8%, respectively. Postoperative complications occurred in 39.8% and were major in 23 patients (27.7%). Re-operation was necessary in 12 cases (14.5%) for one of the following reasons: broncho-pleural fistula (n=4), bleeding (n=3), diaphragmatic patch rupture (n=3), oesophago-pleural fistula (n=1) and empyaema (n=1). The mean hospital stay was 43 days. The median survival was 14.5 months, while the overall 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates were 62.4%, 32.2% and 14.3%, respectively. These results concur with the published data of the most experienced centre with regards to the mortality and morbidity after EPP for MPM. In line with the biggest series reported in the past, the observed 5-year survival rate of almost 15% is disappointing.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 07/2009; 36(4):759-63. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess prognosis depending on whether lymph node involvement (LNI) is intracapsular or with extracapsular breakthrough in patients with a locally advanced esophageal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery. Ninety-four consecutive patients with an esophageal cancer staged IIB (n = 17) and III (n = 77) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by transthoracic esophagectomy with two-field lymphadenectomy. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma (n = 46) and adenocarcinoma (n = 48). Neoadjuvant therapy consisted of association of 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin concomitantly with a 45-Gy radiation therapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) excluding the in-hospital mortality was analyzed according to the nodal status and the invaded/resected lymph node ratio (LNR). Clinical factors affecting survival or predictors of extracapsular invasion were investigated by multivariate analysis. Five-year DFS rates were 46, 36, and 11% in N0 patients (n = 56), intracapsular LNI patients (n = 18), and extracapsular LNI patients (n = 10), respectively (p = 0.002). Intracapsular LNI patients with an LNR <0.1 (n = 12) had a 5-year DFS rate similar to N0 patients (44 versus 46%, p = 0.95). Intracapsular LNI patients with an LNR > or =0.1 (n = 6) had a DFS rate similar to extracapsular LNI patients (18 versus 11%, p = 0.69). Multivariate analysis revealed that the sole independent factor affecting DFS was the extracapsular LNI (HR = 3.9, p = 0.026). The number of invaded LN seemed to be the sole significant predictive factor for the development of ECLNI (HR = 2.39, p = 0.008). After neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, there was a significant difference on DFS depending on whether LNI was intracapsular or extracapsular. Extracapsular invasion seems to be an independent negative prognostic factor affecting survival, and its presence is related to the number of invaded LN.
    Journal of thoracic oncology: official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 04/2009; 4(4):534-9. · 4.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of the mesentery to avoid a further internal hernia, and routine appendectomy. When applying these technical aids, the chances of achieving a viable and well-functioning colon graft are excellent.
    Multimedia Manual of Cardiothoracic Surgery 01/2009; 2009(603):mmcts.2007.002956.
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    ABSTRACT: Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for resectable tumours of the oesophagus. Recent advances of surgical techniques and anaesthesiology have led to a substantial decrease in mortality and morbidity. Respiratory complications affect about 30% of patients after oesophagectomy and 80% of these complications occur within the first five days. Respiratory complications include sputum retention, pneumonia and ARDS. They are the major cause of morbidity and mortality after oesophageal resection and numerous studies have identified the factors associated with these complications. The mechanisms are not very different from those observed after pulmonary resection. Nevertheless, there is an important lack of definition, and evaluation of the incidence is particularly difficult. Furthermore, respiratory complications are related to many factors. Careful medical history, physical examination and pulmonary function testing help to identify the risk factors and provide strategies to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications. Standardized postoperative management and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pulmonary complications are necessary to reduce hospital mortality. This article discusses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors affecting respiratory complications and strategies to reduce the incidence of these complications after oesophagectomy.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 07/2008; 25(6):683-94. · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Some patients with localised oesophageal cancer are treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) rather than surgery. A subset of these patients experiences local failure, relapse or treatment-related complication without distant metastases, with no other curative treatment option but salvage oesophagectomy. The aim of this study was to assess the benefit/risk ratio of surgery in such context. Review of a single institution experience with 24 patients: 18 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 59 years (+/-9). Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 18 cases and adenocarcinoma in 6. Initial stages were cIIA (n=5), cIIB (n=1) and cIII (n=18). CRT consisted of 2-6 sessions of the association 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin concomitantly with a 50-75 Gy radiation therapy. Salvage oesophagectomy was considered for the following reasons: relapse of the disease with conclusive (n=11) or inconclusive biopsies (n=7), intractable stenosis (n=3), and perforation or severe oesophagitis (n=3), at a mean delay of 74 days (14-240 days) following completion of CRT. All patients underwent a transthoracic en-bloc oesophagectomy with 2-field lymphadenectomy. Thirty-day and 90-day mortality rates were 21% and 25%, respectively. Anastomotic leakage (p=0.05), cardiac failure (p=0.05), length of stay (p=0.03) and the number of packed red blood cells (p=0.02) were more frequent in patients who received more than 55 Gy, leading to a doubled in-hospital mortality when compared to that of patients having received lower doses. A R0 resection was achieved in 21 patients (87.5%). A complete pathological response (ypT0N0) was observed in 3 patients (12.5%). Overall and disease-free 5-year survival rates were 35% and 21%, respectively. There was no long-term survivor following R1-R2 resections. Functional results were good in more than 80% of the long-term survivors. Salvage surgery is a highly invasive and morbid operation after a volume dose of radiation exceeding 55 Gy. The indication must be carefully considered, with care taken to avoid incomplete resections. Given that long-term survival with a fair quality of life can be achieved, such high-risk surgery should be considered in selected patients at an experienced centre.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 07/2008; 33(6):1117-23. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: X.-B. D’Journo, P. Michelet, J.-P. Avaro, D. Trousse,R. Giudicelli, P. Fuentes, C. Doddoli, P. Thomas Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for resectable tumours of the oesophagus. Recent advances of surgical techniques and anaesthesiology have led to a substantial decrease in mortality and morbidity. Respiratory complications affect about 30% of patients after oesophagectomy and 80% of these complications occur within the first five days. Respiratory complications include sputum retention, pneumonia and ARDS. They are the major cause of morbidity and mortality after oesophageal resection and numerous studies have identified the factors associated with these complications. The mechanisms are not very different from those observed after pulmonary resection. Nevertheless, there is an important lack of definition, and evaluation of the incidence is particularly difficult. Furthermore, respiratory complications are related to many factors. Careful medical history, physical examination and pulmonary function testing help to identify the risk factors and provide strategies to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications. Standardized postoperative management and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pulmonary complications are necessary to reduce hospital mortality. This article discusses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors affecting respiratory complications and strategies to reduce the incidence of these complications after oesophagectomy.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 06/2008; 25(6):773-773. · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical relevance of preoperative airway colonisation in patients undergoing oesophagectomy for cancer after a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. From 1998 to 2005, 117 patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced stage oesophageal cancer. Among them, 45 non-randomised patients underwent a bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL group) prior to surgery to assess airways colonisation. The remaining patients (n=72) constituted the control group. The two groups were similar with respect to various clinical or pathological characteristics. Thirteen of the 45 BAL patients (28%) had a preoperative bronchial colonisation by either potentially pathogenic micro-organisms (PPMs) (n=7, 16%) or non-potentially pathogenic micro-organisms (n=6, 13%). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was cultured from BAL in four patients. Pre-emptive therapy was administrated in seven patients: four antiviral and three antibiotic prophylaxes. Postoperatively, 14 patients (19%) developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the control group and three (7%) in the BAL group (p=0.064). The cause of ARDS was attributed to CMV pneumonia in six control group patients on the basis of the results of open lung biopsies (n=3) or BAL cultures (n=3) versus none of the BAL group patients (p=0.08). Timing for extubation was shorter in the BAL group (mean 13+/-3 h) as compared with the control group (mean 19.5+/-14 h; p=0.039). In-hospital mortality was not significantly lower in BAL group patients when compared to that of control group patients (8% vs 12.5%). Airway colonisation by PPMs after neoadjuvant therapy is suggested as a possible cause of postoperative ARDS after oesophagectomy. Pre-emptive treatment of bacterial and viral (CMV) colonisation seems an effective option to prevent postoperative pneumonia.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 04/2008; 33(3):444-50. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T4-disease for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes different conditions: mediastinal invasion, neoplastic pleural cytology, and multifocal disease in the same lobe; regarding the last category, no strict criteria allow to differentiate satellite nodules from synchronous multiple primary tumours. Retrospective study of 56 patients who underwent a complete resection from 1985 to 2006 of a NSCLC graded pT4N0 due to multifocal disease. A small nodule (<1cm) closed to the primary tumour, in a same pulmonary segment with an identical histology was considered as a satellite nodule (pT4sn). Multiple tumours, sized more than 1cm, with an identical histology, located in the same lobe but in different segment were considered as synchronous cancers (pT4sc). There were 44 males and 12 females: 35 patients were graded T4sn and 21 patients T4sc. The median age was 62.5 years. The two groups were similar for sex, age, tobacco consumption, ASA score, NYHA, Charlson's index, spirometric parameters, cardiovascular comorbidity and history of previous extra-thoracic malignancies. All had a complete anatomic resection with mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Thirty-day mortality rate was 3.6%. Overall 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 48.2% and 29.9%, respectively. There was a non-significant trend for a worse survival in T4sn group patients when compared to that of T4sc group patients: 42.9% vs 52.3% at 5 years, and 25% vs 34.9% at 10 years (p=0.62). Multifocal T4 stage IIIB disease is a heterogeneous category where overall prognosis is far better than those of other T4 subgroups. Survival rates associated with pT4sn and pT4sc look roughly similar because of the small size of the subgroups usually submitted to comparison in most series. In the present experience, respective survival figures diverge, suggesting different biological behaviours.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 01/2008; 33(1):99-103. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To review the long-term results of redo gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) surgery with special emphasis on residual acid-suppressing medications, pH monitoring results, and quality of life. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 52 patients (24 males) who underwent redo GERD surgery between 1986 and 2006 through a transthoracic (n = 14), or a transabdominal (n = 38) approach. Indications were recurrent GERD in 41 patients, and complication of the initial surgery in 11. Quality of life was evaluated by telephone enquiry using a validated French questionnaire (reflux quality score, RQS). Results: Postoperative complications occurred in 18 patients (35%), resulting in one death (2%). Reoperation was required in seven patients. At 1 year, 26 patients (51%) had 24 h pH monitoring, among whom 2 (8%) were proved to have recurrence of GERD. RQS values were calculated in 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 113 months. Fifty percent of this subgroup had a RQS value beyond 26/32, indicating an excellent quality of life. Among these 38 patients, 20 (53%) had acid-suppressing medications whatever their RQS values. Patients who underwent transthoracic GERD surgery had the highest RQS values (p = 0.02), a lower rate of complications (p = 0.06) and a lower rate of reoperation (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Our experience confirms that selection of candidates for redo GERD surgery is a challenging issue. A transthoracic approach seems to produce better results and lower rates of complications.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 01/2008; · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: No guidelines detailing recommendations for the selection and treatment of patients with synchronous multiple primary lung cancer have been published. We report on a single-institution experience with synchronous multiple primary lung cancer, with emphasis on long-term survival. We performed a retrospective study of 125 consecutive patients with synchronous multiple primary lung cancer who underwent operation between 1985 and 2006. Various treatment strategies were applied, including perioperative therapy. Potential prognosticators were submitted to univariate and multivariate analyses. Tumors were bilateral (n = 34) or ipsilateral (n = 91). Optimal surgical treatment (complete anatomic resection with radical lymphadenectomy) was possible in 65.6% of the cases. pN0 disease was present in 32.3% of the patients; 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 4.5% and 11%, respectively. Two- and 5-year overall survivals were 61.6% and 34%, respectively, with a median survival of 35 months. On univariate analysis, smoking status, high Charlson index, low forced expiratory volume in 1 second, occurrence of postoperative complications, and performance of a pneumonectomy affected the overall survival adversely. Conversely, bilateral disease, location in the same lobe, and pN0 disease were favorable prognosticators. On multivariate analysis, low forced expiratory volume in 1 second, nonoptimal surgical treatment, and performance of a pneumonectomy were independent predictors of poor long-term survival, whereas female sex, younger age, asymptomatic disease, pN0 status, and performance of an adjuvant treatment affected the survival favorably. Provided there is an appropriate selection process, patients with synchronous multiple primary lung cancer are expected to benefit from surgery. Optimal surgery should be performed, but pneumonectomy should be avoided whenever possible. Adjuvant treatment is suggested to provide an added survival advantage.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 06/2007; 133(5):1193-200. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to determine the risk factors and impact on outcome of blood transfusions following pneumonectomy for thoracic malignancies. A retrospective analysis of 432 consecutive patients was carried out, of whom 183 (42.4%) were transfused post-operatively. The associations between blood transfusions and 20 variables were assessed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Survival analysis included log-rank test and Cox regression model. Patient age, neoadjuvant treatment, completion pneumonectomy and extended procedures were independent predictors of transfusion. It was found that 30-day mortality increased significantly from 2.4% (no transfusion) to 10.9 and 21.9% (<or=2 and >2 red blood cell packs, respectively). Blood transfusion was the strongest predictor of 30-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 10; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.7-27), respiratory failure (OR 19.2; 95% CI 7.4-49.4) and infectious complications (OR 3; 95% CI 1.5-6.2). In the 367 lung cancer patients, a significantly lower 5-yr survival was observed in univariate analysis of transfused patients (27.8+/-5.4% versus 39.4+/-4.5%). In a Cox regression analysis, blood transfusion was no longer found to be significant. A dose-related correlation is suggested between blood transfusion and early mortality through an increase of infectious and respiratory complications. In contrast, blood transfusion had no independent adverse impact on long-term survival.
    European Respiratory Journal 03/2007; 29(3):565-70. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term outcome of patients treated for a spontaneous esophageal rupture (Boerhaave's syndrome) is seldom reported. From 1989 to 2004, 62 esophageal perforations were treated in a single institution. Eighteen patients presented with a spontaneous esophageal rupture. Among them, 15 could be treated with a transthoracic primary repair and constituted the material of the present study. A chart review was performed with special attention to survival, residual symptoms, and anatomic and motility disorders. Three patients died postoperatively (20%). At last follow-up, 10 patients were alive and 2 had died from unrelated causes. At a median delay of 13 months (3 to 74), 7 patients accepted to undergo complementary investigations. None of them had any anatomic abnormality as checked by barium swallow. Six patients complained of mild symptoms from gastroesophageal reflux. Six patients (85%) presented with esophageal motility disorders on manometry and 4 (54%) had nocturne chronic reflux disease on pH monitoring. Two patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography, of which one presented with a focal absence of one layer of the esophageal wall within the area of the suture. With time, no patient experienced recurrence, but one developed a cancer in the cervical esophagus. These results suggest that esophageal functional disorders are the rule after primary repair of a Boerhaave's syndrome. Whether or not these findings are causal, coincidental, or related to the surgical treatment remains unclear. However, performance of routine postoperative explorations is strongly encouraged for a better understanding of this challenging condition.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 06/2006; 81(5):1858-62. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ten years after right pneumonectomy for primary lung cancer, a 51 year old man developed a pulmonary artery stump thrombosis which produced microemboli in the remaining lung and, in turn, led to chronic pulmonary hypertension. This case strongly suggests that prolonged postoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis should be considered in patients undergoing right pneumonectomy.
    Thorax 03/2006; 61(2):177-8. · 8.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. – To determine predictive factors of bronchial fistula following pneumonectomy.Patients and methods. – In 14 years (1989–2003), we collect 58 cases of bronchial fistula following 725 consecutive pneumonectomy in the service of thoracic surgery of the Sainte Marguerite Hospital in Marseilles. There were 53 cases (91.4%) of cancers and 5 cases (8.6%) of various pathology. The average age of the patients was of 61±10 years (range 24 to 80 years). The sex ratio M/F was 8.7. The software of regression SPSS (version11.5) was used to identify the factors risk of a bronchial fistula after a univariate and multivariate analysis.Results. – The prevalence of the bronchial fistula after a pneumonectomy was 8%.The preoperative factors which increased to a significant degree the incidence of the bronchial dent to the univariate analysis were the chronic smoking (P
    Annales De Chirurgie - ANN CHIR. 01/2006; 131(1):22-26.
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    ABSTRACT: To determine predictive factors of bronchial fistula following pneumonectomy. In 14 years (1989-2003), we collect 58 cases of bronchial fistula following 725 consecutive pneumonectomy in the service of thoracic surgery of the Sainte Marguerite Hospital in Marseilles. There were 53 cases (91.4%) of cancers and 5 cases (8.6%) of various pathology. The average age of the patients was of 61 +/- 10 years (range 24 to 80 years). The sex ratio M/F was 8.7. The software of regression SPSS (version11.5) was used to identify the factors risk of a bronchial fistula after a univariate and multivariate analysis. The prevalence of the bronchial fistula after a pneumonectomy was 8%.The preoperative factors which increased to a significant degree the incidence of the bronchial dent to the univariate analysis were the chronic smoking (P < 0.001), the existence of COPD (P = 0.001) and of a previous thoracic surgery (P = 0.01). Operational data like a right- side pulmonary resection (P < 0.001), the type of bronchial stup carried out (P = 0.03) as and an extended pneumonectomy to the auricule (P = 0.03) were significant risk factors. With the logistic regression the significant risk factors were the chronic smoking (P = 0.002), the existence of COPD (P = 0.003), a previous pulmonary surgery (P = 0.03) and the right - side of the pneumonectomy (P < 0.001). The indication of the pneumonectomy was retained neither by the univariate analysis, nor by the logistic regression significant risk factors. The predictive factors of a bronchial fistula after a pneumonectomy are dominated by respiratory co-morbidities. To prevent this complication, we insist on the stop of the tobacco, a better respiratory preparation and the acquisition of a protocol adapted of the bronchial stub after a pneumonectomy particularly on the right side.
    Annales de Chirurgie 01/2006; 131(1):22-6. · 0.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Induction Therapy (IT) before surgery emerged as a widely used strategy for IIIAN2 and selected IIIB NSCLC patients. However, IT is associated with a possible increase in postoperative complications. Consequently, selection of patients with the best chances to benefit from combined treatment is mandatory. Study recorded demographics, treatment and outcome of consecutive patients treated with IT plus surgery for IIIAN2 or IIIB NSCLC. Survival was analysed by Kaplan-Meier and prognostic factors were analysed by log-rank and Cox regression. From 1993 to 2003, 155 patients (IIIAN2=95/IIIB=60) were treated. Complete resection was associated with a significant prolonged median survival both for IIIAN2 (20 vs 16 months, P=0.05) and IIIB (20 vs 15 months, P=0.02) patients. A lower risk of death for IIIAN2 patients was independently associated with postoperative mediastinal lymph node clearance (HR=0.45, 95%CI [0.25-0.81], P=0.009) and absence of postoperative complication (HR=0.54, 95%CI [0.31-0.93], P=0.02). Absence of blood vessel invasion only was identified as an independent predictor of a lower risk of death (HR=0.27, 95%CI [0.12-0.59], P=0.01) for stage IIIB patients. Besides similarities as the role of a complete R0 resection, treatment-related factors influence outcome of IIIAN2 patients while disease-related factors prevail on survival of IIIB patients, in whom the benefit of IT is unclear.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 11/2005; 28(4):629-34. · 2.67 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
254.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2010
    • Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille
      • • Service de chirurgie thoracique et des maladies de l'œsophage
      • • Service de chirurgie cardio-thoracique
      Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France
  • 1994–2005
    • Aix-Marseille Université
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1988–1999
    • Institut Paoli Calmettes
      • Cancer Research Center of Marseille (CRCM)
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1993
    • CHRU de Strasbourg
      Strasburg, Alsace, France