Edward F Attiyeh

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (32)444.94 Total impact

  • Edward F Attiyeh, John M Maris
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    ABSTRACT: Utilizing genomic signatures from diagnostic tumor samples to forecast clinical behavior and response to therapy has long been a goal, and we are now poised to further refine how we can identify the relatively rare patients with aggressive neuroblastoma masquerading as patients with a more benign form of the disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer that continues to exact significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, a number of cell cycle proteins, particularly those within the Cyclin D/CDK4/CDK6/RB network, have been shown to exert oncogenic roles in neuroblastoma, suggesting that their therapeutic exploitation might improve patient outcomes. Experimental Procedures. We evaluated the effect of dual CDK4/CDK6 inhibition on neuroblastoma viability using LEE011, a highly specific CDK4/6 inhibitor. Results. Treatment with LEE011 significantly reduced proliferation in 12 of 17 human neuroblastoma-derived cell lines by inducing cytostasis at nanomolar concentrations (mean IC50 = 307 ± 68 nM in sensitive lines). LEE011 caused cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence that was attributed to dose-dependent decreases in phosphorylated RB and FOXM1, respectively. In addition, responsiveness of neuroblastoma xenografts to LEE011 translated to the in vivo setting in that there was a direct correlation of in vitro IC50 values with degree of subcutaneous xenograft growth delay. While our data indicate that neuroblastomas sensitive to LEE011 were more likely to contain genomic amplification of MYCN (p = 0.01), the identification of additional clinically accessible biomarkers is of high importance. Conclusions. Taken together, our data show that LEE011 is active in a large subset of neuroblastoma cell line and xenograft models, and supports the clinical development of this CDK4/6 inhibitor as a therapy for patients with this disease.
    Clinical Cancer Research 09/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a malignancy of the developing sympathetic nervous system that often presents with widespread metastatic disease, resulting in survival rates of less than 50%. To determine the spectrum of somatic mutation in high-risk neuroblastoma, we studied 240 affected individuals (cases) using a combination of whole-exome, genome and transcriptome sequencing as part of the Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments (TARGET) initiative. Here we report a low median exonic mutation frequency of 0.60 per Mb (0.48 nonsilent) and notably few recurrently mutated genes in these tumors. Genes with significant somatic mutation frequencies included ALK (9.2% of cases), PTPN11 (2.9%), ATRX (2.5%, and an additional 7.1% had focal deletions), MYCN (1.7%, causing a recurrent p.Pro44Leu alteration) and NRAS (0.83%). Rare, potentially pathogenic germline variants were significantly enriched in ALK, CHEK2, PINK1 and BARD1. The relative paucity of recurrent somatic mutations in neuroblastoma challenges current therapeutic strategies that rely on frequently altered oncogenic drivers.
    Nature Genetics 01/2013; · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • Nature Genetics. 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a childhood extracranial solid tumor which is associated with a number of genetic changes. Included in these genetic alterations are mutations in the kinase domain of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), which have been found in both somatic and familial neuroblastoma. In order to treat patients accordingly required characterisation of these mutations in terms of their response to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we report the identification and characterisation of two novel neuroblastoma ALK mutations (A1099T and 1464STOP) which we have investigated together with several previously reported but uncharacterised ALK mutations (T1087I, D1091N, T1151M, M1166R, F1174I and A1234T). In order to understand the potential role of these ALK mutations in neuroblastoma progression we have employed cell culture based systems together with the model organism Drosophila as a readout for ligand-independent activity. Mutation of ALK at position F1174I generates a gain-of-function receptor capable of activating intracellular targets, such as ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) in a ligand independent manner. Analysis of these previously uncharacterised ALK mutants and comparison with ALK(F1174) mutants suggests that ALK mutations observed in neuroblastoma fall into three classes. These are: (i) gain-of-function ligand independent mutations such as ALK(F1174), (ii) kinase-dead ALK mutants, e.g. ALK(I1250T)(Schonherr et al 2011a) or (iii) ALK mutations which are ligand-dependent in nature. Irrespective of the nature of the observed ALK mutants, in every case the activity of the mutant ALK receptors could be abrogated by the ALK inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066, Xalkori), albeit with differing levels of sensitivity.
    Disease Models and Mechanisms 10/2012; · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:In the INRG dataset, the hypothesis that any segmental chromosomal alteration might be of prognostic impact in neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification (MNA) was tested.Methods:The presence of any segmental chromosomal alteration (chromosome 1p deletion, 11q deletion and/or chromosome 17q gain) defined a segmental genomic profile. Only tumours with a confirmed unaltered status for all three chromosome arms were considered as having no segmental chromosomal alterations.Results:Among the 8800 patients in the INRG database, a genomic type could be attributed for 505 patients without MNA: 397 cases had a segmental genomic type, whereas 108 cases had an absence of any segmental alteration. A segmental genomic type was more frequent in patients >18 months and in stage 4 disease (P<0.0001). In univariate analysis, 11q deletion, 17q gain and a segmental genomic type were associated with a poorer event-free survival (EFS) (P<0.0001, P=0.0002 and P<0.0001, respectively). In multivariate analysis modelling EFS, the parameters age, stage and a segmental genomic type were retained in the model, whereas the individual genetic markers were not (P<0.0001 and RR=2.56; P=0.0002 and RR=1.8; P=0.01 and RR=1.7, respectively).Conclusion:A segmental genomic profile, rather than the single genetic markers, adds prognostic information to the clinical markers age and stage in neuroblastoma patients without MNA, underlining the importance of pangenomic studies.
    British Journal of Cancer 09/2012; 107(8):1418-22. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the sympathetic nervous system that accounts for approximately 10% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Here, we report a genome-wide association study of 2,817 neuroblastoma cases and 7,473 controls. We identified two new associations at 6q16, the first within HACE1 (rs4336470; combined P = 2.7 × 10(-11); odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-1.35) and the second within LIN28B (rs17065417; combined P = 1.2 × 10(-8); odds ratio 1.38, 95% CI 1.23-1.54). Expression of LIN28B and let-7 miRNA correlated with rs17065417 genotype in neuroblastoma cell lines, and we observed significant growth inhibition upon depletion of LIN28B, specifically in neuroblastoma cells that were homozygous for the risk allele. Low HACE1 and high LIN28B expression in diagnostic primary neuroblastomas were associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.008 and 0.014, respectively). Taken together, these data show that common variants in HACE1 and LIN28B influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and indicate that both genes likely have a role in disease progression.
    Nature Genetics 09/2012; 44(10):1126-30. · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility at loci discovered by genome-wide association study (GWAS) approaches in human cancer remain largely undefined. In this study, we characterized the high-risk neuroblastoma association at the BRCA1-related locus, BARD1, showing that disease-associated variations correlate with increased expression of the oncogenically activated isoform, BARD1β. In neuroblastoma cells, silencing of BARD1β showed genotype-specific cytotoxic effects, including decreased substrate-adherence, anchorage-independence, and foci growth. In established murine fibroblasts, overexpression of BARD1β was sufficient for neoplastic transformation. BARD1β stabilized the Aurora family of kinases in neuroblastoma cells, suggesting both a mechanism for the observed effect and a potential therapeutic strategy. Together, our findings identify BARD1β as an oncogenic driver of high-risk neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, and more generally, they illustrate how robust GWAS signals offer genomic landmarks to identify molecular mechanisms involved in both tumor initiation and malignant progression. The interaction of BARD1β with the Aurora family of kinases lends strong support to the ongoing work to develop Aurora kinase inhibitors for clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.
    Cancer Research 02/2012; 72(8):2068-78. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is used for the diagnostic evaluation of neuroblastoma. We evaluated the relationship between norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression and clinical MIBG uptake. Methods. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (N = 82) and immunohistochemistry (IHC; N = 61) were performed for neuroblastoma NET mRNA and protein expression and correlated with MIBG avidity on diagnostic scans. The correlation of NET expression with clinical features was also performed. Results. Median NET mRNA expression level for the 19 MIBG avid patients was 12.9% (range 1.6-73.7%) versus 5.9% (range 0.6-110.0%) for the 8 nonavid patients (P = 0.31). Median percent NET protein expression was 50% (range 0-100%) in MIBG avid patients compared to 10% (range 0-80%) in nonavid patients (P = 0.027). MYCN amplified tumors had lower NET protein expression compared to nonamplified tumors (10% versus 50%; P = 0.0002). Conclusions. NET protein expression in neuroblastoma correlates with MIBG avidity. MYCN amplified tumors have lower NET protein expression.
    International journal of molecular imaging. 01/2012; 2012:250834.
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    ABSTRACT: Sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common type of adult kidney cancer, is often associated with genomic copy number aberrations on chromosomes 3p and 5q. Aberrations on chromosome 3p are associated with inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene von-Hippel Lindau (VHL), which activates the hypoxia-inducible factors HIF1α and HIF2α. In contrast, ccRCC genes on chromosome 5q remain to be defined. In this study, we conducted an integrated analysis of high-density copy number and gene expression data for 54 sporadic ccRCC tumors that identified the secreted glycoprotein STC2 (stanniocalcin 2) and the proteoglycan VCAN (versican) as potential 5q oncogenes in ccRCCs. In functional assays, STC2 and VCAN each promoted tumorigenesis by inhibiting cell death. Using the same approach, we also investigated the two VHL-deficient subtypes of ccRCC, which express both HIF1α and HIF2α (H1H2) or only HIF2α (H2). This analysis revealed a distinct pattern of genomic aberrations in each group, with the H1H2 group displaying, on average, a more aberrant genome than the H2 group. Together our findings provide a significant advance in understanding ccRCCs by offering a molecular definition of two subtypes with distinct characteristics as well as two potential chromosome 5q oncogenes, the overexpression of which is sufficient to promote tumorigenesis by limiting cell death.
    Cancer Research 11/2011; 72(1):112-21. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epigenetic modifications such as methylation of CpG islands in tumor-suppressor gene promoter regions have been associated with tumor development in many human cancers. Using methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method, we analyzed the methylation status of 35 different genes in 16 neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and 50 NB tumor samples (NBs), and investigated whether specific hypermethylation was associated with biological and/or clinical parameters. Among the genes found hypermethylated, the effect of GSTP1 hypermethylation on mRNA and protein expression was also explored. The median number of hypermethylated genes was higher in cell lines compared to NBs (5.5 vs. 2). For eight genes, aberrant methylation of CpG-islands in NB was not (ESR1, PAX5, WT1, CADM1, MSH6, and CDKN2B) or very rarely (CDH13 and GSTP1) reported in literature. GSTP1 was found hypermethylated in 44% of the NB cell lines and in 33% of the stage 4-11qLOH -non MYCN-amplified high risk NBs. Hypermethylation was correlated with reduced mRNA and protein expression. In the whole NBs cohort, GSTP1 hypermethylation was less frequently detected (8%), but found to be associated with lower event-free (EFS) and overall survival. Hypermethylation of GSTP1 showed also association with lower EFS in high risk subgroups as stage 4 and older patients (≥547 days). Our results suggest that, as in several adult cancers, aberrant methylation of GSTP1 may contribute to the carcinogenetic process in NB and could be potentially used as a new marker leading to define an ultra-high risk subgroup.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 11/2011; 51(2):174-85. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a malignant neoplasm of the developing sympathetic nervous system that is notable for its phenotypic diversity. High-risk patients typically have widely disseminated disease at diagnosis and a poor survival probability, but low-risk patients frequently have localized tumors that are almost always cured with little or no chemotherapy. Our genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified common variants within FLJ22536, BARD1, and LMO1 as significantly associated with neuroblastoma and more robustly associated with high-risk disease. Here we show that a GWAS focused on low-risk cases identified SNPs within DUSP12 at 1q23.3 (P = 2.07 × 10⁻⁶), DDX4 and IL31RA both at 5q11.2 (P = 2.94 × 10⁻⁶ and 6.54 × 10⁻⁷ respectively), and HSD17B12 at 11p11.2 (P = 4.20 × 10⁻⁷) as being associated with the less aggressive form of the disease. These data demonstrate the importance of robust phenotypic data in GWAS analyses and identify additional susceptibility variants for neuroblastoma.
    PLoS Genetics 03/2011; 7(3):e1002026. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • Rebecca J Deyell, Edward F Attiyeh
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in the field of genomics have led to multiple recent discoveries in the understanding of genetic predisposition and molecular pathogenesis of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood and is responsible for 10% of childhood cancer related mortality. The genetic etiology of rare families with hereditary neuroblastoma is now largely understood, with the majority having activating mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple common, low penetrance genetic polymorphisms that are associated with a predisposition to sporadic neuroblastoma, and these associations are disease phenotype specific. While many of the discoveries related to variations in the host genome that predispose to neuroblastoma are recent, there is a long and robust history of investigation of tumor cell genomics, leading to the identification of multiple biomarkers of tumor aggressiveness. Current patient risk stratification algorithms utilize key genomic features for therapy assignment. Microarray-based tumor DNA and RNA profiling techniques and next generation sequencing efforts may further refine these risk groups and identify new tractable therapeutic targets. Moving forward, integrative genomics efforts will be needed to discover how the interaction of germline genetic variations influence oncogenesis in neuroblastoma-both initiation and progression. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the understanding of germline predisposition and molecular pathogenesis of neuroblastoma.
    Cancer Genetics 03/2011; 204(3):113-21. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is often fatal despite intense multimodality therapy. In an effort to identify therapeutic targets for this disease, we performed a comprehensive loss-of-function screen of the protein kinome. Thirty kinases showed significant cellular cytotoxicity when depleted, with loss of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1/CHEK1) being the most potent. CHK1 mRNA expression was higher in MYC-Neuroblastoma-related (MYCN)-amplified (P < 0.0001) and high-risk (P = 0.03) tumors. Western blotting revealed that CHK1 was constitutively phosphorylated at the ataxia telangiectasia response kinase target site Ser345 and the autophosphorylation site Ser296 in neuroblastoma cell lines. This pattern was also seen in six of eight high-risk primary tumors but not in control nonneuroblastoma cell lines or in seven of eight low-risk primary tumors. Neuroblastoma cells were sensitive to the two CHK1 inhibitors SB21807 and TCS2312, with median IC(50) values of 564 nM and 548 nM, respectively. In contrast, the control lines had high micromolar IC(50) values, indicating a strong correlation between CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity (P = 0.0004). Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that CHK1 inhibition in neuroblastoma cells caused apoptosis during S-phase, consistent with its role in replication fork progression. CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity correlated with total MYC(N) protein levels, and inducing MYCN in retinal pigmented epithelial cells resulted in CHK1 phosphorylation, which caused growth inhibition when inhibited. These data show the power of a functional RNAi screen to identify tractable therapeutical targets in neuroblastoma and support CHK1 inhibition strategies in this disease.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2011; 108(8):3336-41. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer of the sympathetic nervous system that accounts for approximately 10% of all paediatric oncology deaths. To identify genetic risk factors for neuroblastoma, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 2,251 patients and 6,097 control subjects of European ancestry from four case series. Here we report a significant association within LIM domain only 1 (LMO1) at 11p15.4 (rs110419, combined P = 5.2 × 10(-16), odds ratio of risk allele = 1.34 (95% confidence interval 1.25-1.44)). The signal was enriched in the subset of patients with the most aggressive form of the disease. LMO1 encodes a cysteine-rich transcriptional regulator, and its paralogues (LMO2, LMO3 and LMO4) have each been previously implicated in cancer. In parallel, we analysed genome-wide DNA copy number alterations in 701 primary tumours. We found that the LMO1 locus was aberrant in 12.4% through a duplication event, and that this event was associated with more advanced disease (P < 0.0001) and survival (P = 0.041). The germline single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles and somatic copy number gains were associated with increased LMO1 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines and primary tumours, consistent with a gain-of-function role in tumorigenesis. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated depletion of LMO1 inhibited growth of neuroblastoma cells with high LMO1 expression, whereas forced expression of LMO1 in neuroblastoma cells with low LMO1 expression enhanced proliferation. These data show that common polymorphisms at the LMO1 locus are strongly associated with susceptibility to developing neuroblastoma, but also may influence the likelihood of further somatic alterations at this locus, leading to malignant progression.
    Nature 01/2011; 469(7329):216-20. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Common copy number variations (CNVs) represent a significant source of genetic diversity, yet their influence on phenotypic variability, including disease susceptibility, remains poorly understood. To address this problem in human cancer, we performed a genome-wide association study of CNVs in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, a disease in which single nucleotide polymorphism variations are known to influence susceptibility. We first genotyped 846 Caucasian neuroblastoma patients and 803 healthy Caucasian controls at approximately 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and performed a CNV-based test for association. We then replicated significant observations in two independent sample sets comprised of a total of 595 cases and 3,357 controls. Here we describe the identification of a common CNV at chromosome 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma in the discovery set, which was confirmed in both replication sets. This CNV was validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescent in situ hybridization and analysis of matched tumour specimens, and was shown to be heritable in an independent set of 713 cancer-free parent-offspring trios. We identified a previously unknown transcript within the CNV that showed high sequence similarity to several neuroblastoma breakpoint family (NBPF) genes and represents a new member of this gene family (NBPF23). This transcript was preferentially expressed in fetal brain and fetal sympathetic nervous tissues, and the expression level was strictly correlated with CNV state in neuroblastoma cells. These data demonstrate that inherited copy number variation at 1q21.1 is associated with neuroblastoma and implicate a previously unknown neuroblastoma breakpoint family gene in early tumorigenesis of this childhood cancer.
    Nature 07/2009; 459(7249):987-91. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a SNP-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) focused on the high-risk subset of neuroblastoma. As our previous unbiased GWAS showed strong association of common 6p22 SNP alleles with aggressive neuroblastoma, we restricted our analysis here to 397 high-risk cases compared to 2,043 controls. We detected new significant association of six SNPs at 2q35 within the BARD1 locus (P(allelic) = 2.35 x 10(-9)-2.25 x 10(-8)). We confirmed each SNP association in a second series of 189 high-risk cases and 1,178 controls (P(allelic) = 7.90 x 10(-7)-2.77 x 10(-4)). We also tested the two most significant SNPs (rs6435862, rs3768716) in two additional independent high-risk neuroblastoma case series, yielding combined allelic odds ratios of 1.68 each (P = 8.65 x 10(-18) and 2.74 x 10(-16), respectively). We also found significant association with known BARD1 nonsynonymous SNPs. These data show that common variation in BARD1 contributes to the etiology of the aggressive and most clinically relevant subset of human neuroblastoma.
    Nature Genetics 06/2009; 41(6):718-23. · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stromal contamination is one of the major confounding factors in the analysis of solid tumor samples by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. As we propose to use genome-wide SNP microarray analysis as a diagnostic platform for neuroblastoma, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of these studies must be optimized. To investigate the effects of stromal contamination, we derived early-passage cell lines from nine primary tumors and compared their genomic signature with that of the primary tumors using 100K SNP arrays. The average concordance between tumor and cell line for raw loss of heterozygosity (LOH) calls was 96% (range, 91-99%) and for raw copy number alterations, 71% (range, 43-87%). In general, there were a larger number of LOH events identified in the cell lines compared with the matched tumor samples (mean increase, 3.2% +/- 1.9%). We have developed an algorithm that shows that the presence of stroma contributes to under-reporting of LOH and copy number loss. Notable findings in this sample set were uniparental disomy of chromosome arms 11p, 1q, 14q, and 15q and a novel area of amplification on chromosome band 11p15. Our analysis shows that LOH was identified significantly more often in derived cell lines compared with the original tumor samples. Although these may in part be due to clonal selection during adaptation to tissue culture, our study indicates that stromal contamination may be a major contributing factor in underestimation of LOH and copy number loss events.
    Cancer Research 06/2009; 69(10):4143-9. · 9.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
444.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2005–2013
    • The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
      • • Center for Applied Genomics
      • • Division of Oncology
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2009–2011
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Medicine
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2007
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States