Taishi Sasaoka

Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan

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Publications (15)79.39 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, is the most prevalent hereditary cardiac disease. Although there are several reports on the systematic screening of mutations in the disease-causing genes in European and American populations, only limited information is available for Asian populations, including Japanese. Genetic screening of disease-associated mutations in 8 genes for sarcomeric proteins, MYH7, MYBPC3, MYL2, MYL3, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, and ACTC, was performed by direct sequencing in 112 unrelated Japanese proband patients with familial HCM; 37 different mutations, including 13 novel ones in 5 genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, and TPM1, were identified in 49 (43.8%) patients. Among them, 3 carried compound heterozygous mutations in MYBPC3 or TNNT2. The frequency of patients carrying the MYBPC3, MYH7, and TNNT2 mutations were 19.6%, 10.7%, and 8.9%, respectively, and the most frequently affected genes in the northeastern and southwestern parts of Japan were MYBPC3 and MYH7, respectively. Several mutations were found in multiple unrelated proband patients, for which the geographic distribution suggested founder effects of the mutations. This study demonstrated the frequency and distribution of mutations in a large cohort of familial HCM in Japan.
    Circulation Journal 11/2011; 76(2):453-61. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is caused by a thrombotic occlusion or spasm of the coronary artery. Association of genetic variants with susceptibility to CAD has been reported in various populations, but the association should be replicated in other populations to establish the role of genetic variants in CAD. We conducted a case-control study with a total of 1480 CAD cases and 2115 controls from two East Asian populations, Japanese and Korean, to validate the associations of CAD with eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight loci, which were identified from large-scale whole-genome association studies in Europeans or East Asians. Among the tested SNPs, one SNP in BRAP (rs11066001) showed a significant association in allele frequency distribution with CAD in both the Japanese (Odds ratio (OR)=1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI); 1.41-1.89, P=5.0 x 10(-11), corrected P (Pc)=4.0 x 10(-10)) and Korean populations (OR=1.68, 95% CI; 1.41-2.00, P=6.5 x 10(-9), Pc=5.2 x 10(-9)), and a meta-analysis showed a significant association in the East Asian populations (OR=1.65, 95% CI; 1.48-1.85, P=1.8 x 10(-18), Pc=1.4 x 10(-17)), whereas no evidence of association was found for the other SNPs. In addition, a combined analysis of BRAP and another CAD locus on 9p21 suggested that these loci had a synergistic role in the susceptibility. Failure to replicate the association with the other SNPs, which were reported in the European populations, suggested that their contributions to CAD were not large enough to be readily captured in the East Asian populations.
    Journal of Human Genetics 09/2009; 54(11):642-6. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke are the major health problems in many countries because of their increasing prevalence and high mortality. It is well known that CAD and stroke are based on atherosclerosis and shared environmental and genetic risk factors. Recently, an association of a functional sequence variation -154G>A in the angiotensin receptor-like 1 (AGTRL1) with a susceptibility to stroke was reported. In this study, we investigated a total of 1479 CAD cases and 2062 controls from the Japanese and Korean populations to validate the association of AGTRL1 with CAD. However, we obtained no evidence of the association in both the Japanese (odds ratio (OR)=0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.82-1.10, P=0.47, allele count model) and Korean (OR=0.90, 95% CI; 0.77-1.05, P=0.18, allele count model) populations. In addition, there was no trend of association between the risk allele and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. These data suggested that AGTRL1 did not contribute much to the atherosclerosis of the coronary artery.
    Journal of Human Genetics 09/2009; 54(9):554-6. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is based on the atherosclerosis of coronary artery and may manifest with myocardial infarction or angina pectoris. Although it is widely accepted that genetic factors are linked to CAD and several disease-related genes have been reported, only a few could be replicated suggesting that there might be some other CAD-related genes. To identify novel susceptibility loci for CAD, we used microsatellite markers in the screening and found six different candidate CAD loci. Subsequent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association studies revealed an association between CAD and megakaryoblastic leukemia factor-1 gene (MKL1). The association with a promoter SNP of MKL1, -184C > T, was found in a Japanese population and the association was replicated in another Japanese population and a Korean population. Functional analysis of the MKL1 promoter SNP suggested that the higher MKL1 expression was associated with CAD. These findings suggest that MKL1 is involved in the pathogenesis of CAD.
    Human Genetics 06/2009; 126(4):539-47. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become a major health problem in many countries because of its increasing prevalence and high mortality. Recently, an association of a functional sequence variation, -8C>G, in the human proteasome subunit alpha type 6 gene (PSMA6) with the susceptibility to CAD was reported. To validate the association, we investigated a total of 1330 cases and 2554 controls from Japanese and Korean populations for PSMA6 genotypes, and no evidence of the association was obtained in both Japanese (odds ratio (OR)=1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.90-1.19, P=0.66, allele count model) and Korean populations (OR=1.00, 95% CI; 0.86-1.17, P=0.95, allele count model). However, when a meta-analysis of data from this study and previously reported six replication studies was done, OR was 1.08 for the G allele (95% CI; 1.02-1.14, P=0.0057), suggesting that the contribution of PSMA6 to CAD was not large enough to be readily replicated. Further studies are required to establish the contribution of this variant in the susceptibility to CAD.
    Journal of Human Genetics 03/2009; 54(4):248-51. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become a major health problem in many countries. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified the association between rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21 and susceptibility to CAD in Caucasoid populations. In this study, we evaluated the associations of rs1333049 with CAD in Japanese (604 patients and 1,151 controls) and Koreans (679 patients and 706 controls). We found a significant association in both Japanese [odds ratio (OR)=1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI); 1.13-1.49, p=0.00027, allele count model] and Koreans (OR=1.19, 95% CI; 1.02-1.38, p=0.025, allele count model). These observations demonstrated that chromosome 9p21 was the susceptibility locus for CAD also in East Asians.
    Journal of Human Genetics 02/2008; 53(4):357-9. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated wall stress by hypertension induces an adaptive myocardial hypertrophy via releasing prohypertrophic hormones such as angiotensin II. In this study, we investigated the involvement of bone morphogenetic protein-10 (BMP10) in hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Expression of BMP10 was increased in the hypertrophied ventricles from hypertensive rats. BMP10 localized on cell surface and at stretch-sensing Z disc of cardiomyocytes, where BMP10 interacted with a protein called titin-cap (Tcap). A rare variant of the human BMP10 gene, Thr326Ile, was found to be associated with hypertensive dilated cardiomyopathy. The variant BMP10 demonstrated decreased binding to Tcap and increased extracellular secretion. Conditioned medium from cells transfected with wild-type or variant BMP10 induced hypertrophy in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, except that medium from variant BMP10-carrying cells showed an enhanced effect reflecting the increased secretion. These observations suggested that hypertension induced expression of prohypertrophic BMP10, and the hypertrophic effect of BMP10 was modulated, at least in part, by its binding to Tcap at the Z disc.
    AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology 01/2008; 293(6):H3396-403. · 4.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a cardiac disease characterized by dilated ventricle and systolic dysfunction. Most of the DCM patients are sporadic cases, but a certain population of DCM patients can be familial cases caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere/Z-disc components including titin/connectin. However, disease-causing mutations could be identified only in a part of the familial DCM patients, suggesting that there should be other disease causing genes for DCM. To explore a novel disease gene for DCM, we searched for mutations in FHL2, encoding for four and half LIM protein 2 (FHL2) in DCM patients, because FHL2 is known to associate with titin/connectin. A missense mutation, Gly48Ser, was identified in a patient with familial DCM. Functional analysis demonstrated that the FHL2 mutation affected the binding to titin/connectin. Because FHL2 protein is known to tether metabolic enzymes to titin/connectin, these observations suggest that the Gly48Ser mutation may be involved in the pathogenesis of DCM via impaired recruitment of metabolic enzymes to the sarcomere.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 06/2007; 357(1):162-7. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the recently reported associations of polymorphisms in lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA) and galectin-2 (LGALS2) with myocardial infarction (MI), we analyzed a single nucleotide polymorphism of LTA (LTA 252A>G in LTA intron 1) and that of LGALS2 (LGALS2 3279C>T in LGALS2 intron 1) in Japanese and Korean populations. Although significant associations with MI were not observed in either population, we found that LTA 252GG was significantly associated with the severity of the disease for both the Japanese and Korean populations (P=0.017 and P=0.001, respectively). On the other hand, the polymorphism of LGALS2 was not associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. These observations showed that, while the LTA 252GG genotype might modify the development of coronary atherosclerosis, the relation of LTA and LGALS2 to MI itself remained much less certain.
    Tissue Antigens 03/2007; 69(3):265-9. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There have been many studies investigating the association between gene polymorphisms and coronary artery disease (CAD) including myocardial infarction (MI), and some studies have shown that certain gene polymorphisms are associated with CAD/MI. However, the results of the association have sometimes been controversial. The reason may be that the contribution of genetic risk factors to CAD/MI varies depending on the ethnic, environmental, and habitual backgrounds, and differs between males and females. In this study, we analyzed 17 polymorphisms in 12 candidate genes for MI in 136 patients and 200 to 235 controls, and found that there is a significant association of MI with the polymorphisms in the genes for E-selectin and CD14 receptor. To further explore the association, we investigated the C-260 T polymorphism in the promoter region of the CD14 gene in 502 MI patients and 527 control subjects. The genotype distributions of the CD14 polymorphism were as follows: patients; T/T 32.5%, C/T 48.2%, C/C 19.3%, and controls; T/T 25.4%, C/T 52.8%, C/C 21.8%. The frequencies of the T/T homozygotes were significantly higher in the patients (OR = 1.41, P = 0.013) than in the control group, confirming the association of CD14 polymorphism with MI in Japanese. Stratification analyses further demonstrated that the association was more prominent in females and in patients with a relatively low body mass index, suggesting that the contribution of the CD14-linked genetic risk to MI differs with respect to gender and habitual background.
    Japanese Heart Journal 10/2003; 44(5):613-22. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polymorphisms found in genes encoding adhesion molecules have been reported to be associated with atherosclerosis. We investigated the Ser128Arg polymorphism in the E-selectin gene in Japanese patients with myocardial infarction and its functional significance. Results from 135 patients with myocardial infarction and 327 control subjects revealed that the frequency of Arg128-positive was significantly higher in the patients than in controls (12.6% versus 6.7%; odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.04 to 3.85), indicating that the Ser128Arg polymorphism was associated with myocardial infarction. We then generated a recombinant E-selectin adenovirus carrying a mutation (AdS128R-E) and compared it with its wild-type counterpart by evaluating the adhesion characteristics of transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cells under flow. AdS128R-E-transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cells supported significantly more rolling and adhesion of neutrophils and mononuclear cells compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells transduced with AdWT-E (P<0.001) and also exhibited significantly greater levels of phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that an altered endothelial signaling pathway is associated with this polymorphism. Our results suggest that the E-selectin Ser128Arg polymorphism can functionally alter leukocyte-endothelial interactions as well as biochemical and biological consequences, which may account for the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 05/2003; 23(5):783-8. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined three missense polymorphisms of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), Val125Leu, Asn563Ser, and Gly670Arg, in 136 Japanese patients with myocardial infarction and 235 healthy Japanese controls. We found that these polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium with each other and that frequencies of 125Leu, 563Ser, and 670Arg alleles were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (0.522 vs 0.447, p= 0.048; 0.585 vs 0.502, p= 0.030; and 0.577 vs 0.492, p= 0.032, respectively). The frequencies of homozygotes for 563Ser and 670Arg alleles were also significantly increased in the patients (33.1% vs 23.4%, odds risk [OR] = 1.62, p= 0.040, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 1.01-2.58; and 32.4% vs 23.0%, OR = 1.60, p= 0.048, 95%CI = 1.00-2.57, respectively). These observations suggest that the 563Ser/Ser genotype and 670Arg/Arg genotype of PECAM-1 are novel genetic risk factors of myocardial infarction in Japanese. Stratification analysis of the patients showed that the associations of these PECAM-1 genotypes with myocardial infarction were preferentially found in male and younger patients (age of onset of myocardial infarction less than 60 years). In addition, the associations were stronger in patients with three-vessel disease than in the others and appeared independent of conventional risk factors including smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 11/2001; 947(1):259 - 270. · 4.38 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Cardiac Failure - J CARD FAIL. 01/1999; 5(3):92-92.
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    ABSTRACT: To further clarify the HLA-linked genes susceptible to arterio-vasculitis of unknown etiology, Takayasu's arteritis and Buerger's disease, polymorphism in the MICA gene, a newly identified gene near the HLA-B gene and expressed in epithelial cell lineage, was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA conformation polymorphism (DCP) analysis and subsequent sequencing of the MICA gene have revealed that there are 5 MICA alleles which are different in the number of a GCT repeat in exon 5: MICA alleles MICA-1.1, -1.2, -1.3 and -1.4 have 9, 6, 5 and 4 GCT repeats, respectively, and MICA-1.5 has 5 GCT repeats with a 1 bp frameshift insertion in the repeat. MICA genotyping data in 81 Japanese patients with Takayasu's arteritis, 38 Japanese patients with Buerger's disease, and 160 healthy Japanese controls showed that MICA-1.2 and -1.4 were significantly associated with Takayasu's arteritis and Buerger's disease, respectively. Because MICA-1.2 and -1.4 were in strong linkage disequilibria with HLA-B52 and -B54 in the Japanese populations, respectively, we have compared the odds ratio (OR) of the risk to the diseases for individuals having both or each of the disease-associated MICA and HLA-B alleles. It was found that MICA-1.2 gave a significantly high OR of risk to Takayasu's arteritis in the absence of HLA-B52, suggesting that the HLA-linked gene susceptible to Takayasu's arteritis is mapped near the MICA gene. In contrast, MICA-1.4 gave a significantly high OR of risk to Buerger's disease only in the presence of HLA-B54, suggesting that the HLA-linked gene susceptible to Buerger's disease is linked to the HLA-B54-MICA-1.4 haplotype, and may be differently mapped from that to Takayasu's arteritis.
    International Journal of Cardiology 11/1998; 66 Suppl 1:S107-13; discussion S115. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common cause of sudden death in the young, is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy accompanied by myofibrillar disarrays. Linkage studies and candidate-gene approaches have demonstrated that about half of the patients have mutations in one of six disease genes: cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (c beta MHC), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), alpha-tropomyosin (alpha TM), cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBPC), ventricular myosin essential light chain (vMLC1) and ventricular myosin regulatory light chain (vMLC2) genes. Other disease genes remain unknown. Because all the known disease genes encode major contractile elements in cardiac muscle, we have systematically characterized the cardiac sarcomere genes, including cardiac troponin I (cTnI), cardiac actin (cACT) and cardiac troponin C (cTnC) in 184 unrelated patients with HCM and found mutations in the cTnI gene in several patients. Family studies showed that an Arg145Gly mutation was linked to HCM and a Lys206Gln mutation had occurred de novo, thus strongly suggesting that cTnI is the seventh HCM gene.
    Nature Genetics 09/1997; 16(4):379-82. · 35.21 Impact Factor