Damien Thierry

Institut de veille sanitaire, Charenton, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (10)44.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The presence of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Western Europe is commonly attributed to migration of individuals from non-European countries, but the possible role of domestic infections with non-B subtypes is not well investigated. French mandatory anonymous reporting system for HIV is linked to a virological surveillance using assays for recent infection (<6 months) and serotyping. During the first semester of years 2007 to 2010, any sample corresponding to a non-B recent infection was analyzed by sequencing a 415 bp env region, followed by phylogenetic analysis and search for transmission clusters. Two hundred and thirty three recent HIV-1 infections with non-B variants were identified. They involved 5 subtypes and 7 CRFs. Ninety-two cases (39.5%) were due to heterosexual transmissions, of which 39 occurred in patients born in France. Eighty-five cases (36.5%) were identified in men having sex with men (MSM). Forty-three recent non-B infections (18.5%) segregated into 14 clusters, MSM being involved in 11 of them. Clustered transmissions events included 2 to 7 cases per cluster. The largest cluster involved MSM infected by a CRF02_AG variant. In conclusion, we found that the spread of non-B subtypes in France occurs in individuals of French origin and that MSM are particularly involved in this dynamic.
    Journal of clinical microbiology. 09/2014;
  • JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 08/2012; 60(4):e114-7. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Among 61 and 35 patients who were infected in France by viruses of the rare clades D and CRF01_AE, respectively, approximately half of them originated from areas where HIV-1 is endemic, but the data showed that both clades have spread in the French indigenous population, particularly in men having sex with men (MSM).
    Journal of clinical microbiology 05/2012; 50(7):2484-8. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Routine national incidence testing with enzyme immunoassay for recent HIV-1 infections (EIA-RI) has been done in France since January, 2003. From the reported number of HIV infections diagnosed as recent, and accounting for testing patterns and under-reporting, we aimed to estimate the incidence of HIV infection in France in 2003-08. We analysed reports from the French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance for patients who were newly diagnosed with HIV between January, 2003, and December, 2008. Missing data were imputed with multiple imputation. Patients were classified with non-recent or recent infection on the basis of an EIA-RI test, which was calibrated with serial measurements from HIV seroconverters from the French ANRS-PRIMO cohort. We used an adapted stratified extrapolation approach to calculate the number of new HIV infections in men who have sex with men (MSM), injecting drug users (IDUs), and heterosexual men and women by nationality. Population sizes were obtained from the national census and national behavioural studies. After accounting for under-reporting, there were 6480 (95% CI 6190-6780) new diagnoses of HIV infection in France in 2008. We estimate that there were 6940 (6200-7690) new HIV infections in 2008, suggesting an HIV incidence of 17 per 100 000 person-years. In 2008, there were 3550 (3040-4050) new infections in heterosexuals (incidence of 9 per 100 000 person-years), 3320 (2830-3810) in MSM (incidence of 1006 per 100 000 person-years), and 70 (0-190) in IDUs (incidence of 86 per 100 000 person-years). Overall HIV incidence decreased between 2003 and 2008 (p<0·0001), but remained comparatively high and stable in MSM. In France, HIV transmission disproportionately affects certain risk groups and seems to be out of control in the MSM population. Incidence should be tracked to monitor transmission dynamics in the various population risk groups and to help to target and assess prevention strategies. French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance (InVS) and French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS).
    The Lancet Infectious Diseases 10/2010; 10(10):682-7. · 19.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Routine national incidence testing with enzyme immunoassay for recent HIV-1 infections (EIA-RI) has been done in France since January, 2003. From the reported number of HIV infections diagnosed as recent, and accounting for testing patterns and under-reporting, we aimed to estimate the incidence of HIV infection in France in 2003–08. Methods We analysed reports from the French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance for patients who were newly diagnosed with HIV between January, 2003, and December, 2008. Missing data were imputed with multiple imputation. Patients were classified with non-recent or recent infection on the basis of an EIA-RI test, which was calibrated with serial measurements from HIV seroconverters from the French ANRS-PRIMO cohort. We used an adapted stratified extrapolation approach to calculate the number of new HIV infections in men who have sex with men (MSM), injecting drug users (IDUs), and heterosexual men and women by nationality. Population sizes were obtained from the national census and national behavioural studies. Findings After accounting for under-reporting, there were 6480 (95% CI 6190–6780) new diagnoses of HIV infection in France in 2008. We estimate that there were 6940 (6200–7690) new HIV infections in 2008, suggesting an HIV incidence of 17 per 100 000 person-years. In 2008, there were 3550 (3040–4050) new infections in heterosexuals (incidence of 9 per 100 000 person-years), 3320 (2830–3810) in MSM (incidence of 1006 per 100 000 person-years), and 70 (0–190) in IDUs (incidence of 86 per 100 000 person-years). Overall HIV incidence decreased between 2003 and 2008 (p<0·0001), but remained comparatively high and stable in MSM. Interpretation In France, HIV transmission disproportionately affects certain risk groups and seems to be out of control in the MSM population. Incidence should be tracked to monitor transmission dynamics in the various population risk groups and to help to target and assess prevention strategies. Funding French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance (InVS) and French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS).
    Lancet Infectious Diseases - LANCET INFECT DIS. 01/2010; 10(10):682-687.
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiology of HCV infection among drug users (DUs) has been widely studied. Prevalence and sociobehavioural data among DUs are therefore available in most countries but no study has taken into account in the sampling weights one important aspect of the way of life of DUs, namely that they can use one or more specialized services during the study period. In 2004-2005, we conducted a national seroepidemiologic survey of DUs, based on a random sampling design using the Generalised Weight Share Method (GWSM) and on blood testing. A cross-sectional multicenter survey was done among DUs having injected or snorted drugs at least once in their life. We conducted a two stage random survey of DUs selected to represent the diversity of drug use. The fact that DUs can use more than one structure during the study period has an impact on their inclusion probabilities. To calculate a correct sampling weight, we used the GWSM. A sociobehavioral questionnaire was administered by interviewers. Selected DUs were asked to self-collect a fingerprick blood sample on blotting paper. Of all DUs selected, 1462 (75%) accepted to participate. HCV seroprevalence was 59.8% [95% CI: 50.7-68.3]. Of DUs under 30 years, 28% were HCV seropositive. Of HCV-infected DUs, 27% were unaware of their status. In the month prior to interview, 13% of DUs shared a syringe, 38% other injection parapharnelia and 81% shared a crack pipe. In multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with HCV seropositivity were age over 30, HIV seropositivity, having ever injected drugs, opiate substitution treatment (OST), crack use, and precarious housing. This is the first time that blood testing combined to GWSM is applied to a DUs population, which improve the estimate of HCV prevalence. HCV seroprevalence is high, indeed by the youngest DUs. And a large proportion of DUs are not aware of their status. Our multivariate analysis identifies risk factors such as crack consumption and unstable housing.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 08/2009; 9:113. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In France, blood donations found to be positive for the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are further tested to detect recent infections (< or =180 days) using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA-RI) developed in 2002. The characteristics of recently infected donors, estimates of HIV-1 incidence, and the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV-1 are presented, in both first-time and repeat donors. Of the 1027 donations found to be HIV-1-positive between 1992 and 2006, a total of 459 could be retrospectively tested with the EIA-RI. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the donor characteristics associated with recent infection. Incidence rates and residual risk obtained with the EIA-RI were compared to classical cohort estimates derived from repeat donor histories. Of the 459 HIV-1-positive donors studied, 105 (22.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 19.2-27.0) were identified as recently infected. Factors independently associated with recent infection were repeat donor status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.0; 95% CI, 2.4-6.9) and non-B subtypes (AOR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6). Incidence decreased from 4.3 (95% CI, 1.9-9.4) in 1992 through 1994 to 1.3 (95% CI, 0.6-2.8) per 10(5) in 2004 through 2006 in first-time donors and from 3.2 (95% CI, 2.0-5.0) to 0.8 (95% CI, 0.4-1.4) per 10(5) in repeat donors. Incidence and residual risk estimates were similar to those obtained with the classical cohort method. This study suggests that the EIA-RI can be used to estimate HIV-1 incidence in a population with low HIV incidence. The estimated HIV-1 incidence in the blood donor population confirms the extremely low risk (1 in 3,350,000 donations) of HIV-infected blood donations entering the blood supply in France.
    Transfusion 05/2008; 48(8):1567-75. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French national surveillance of new HIV diagnoses included the collection of dried serum spots to identify HIV serotypes. Between January 2003 and June 2006, 10,184 new diagnoses were reported. The proportions of HIV-2 and HIV-1 group O infections were 1.8 and 0.1%, respectively. Most of these cases occurred in patients infected through heterosexual contact and originated from the corresponding endemic areas. Three cases of HIV-2 infections were reported in non-African men having sex with men.
    AIDS 12/2007; 21(17):2351-3. · 6.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies have demonstrated the utility of the dried blood spot (DBS) or dried plasma/serum spot (DSS) method for serological and molecular diagnosis of HIV infection. Here, we report on the description of a serotyping assay performed on DSS, and its application to a national surveillance program of HIV variants. We combined serotyping assays that we developed previously to discriminate between HIV-1 and HIV-2, between HIV-1 group O and HIV-1 group M, and between B and non-B subtypes of HIV-1 group M. The assays are based on antibody binding to either the immunodominant epitope of gp41 or the V3 domain of gp120 of these various types, groups and subtypes. Therefore, a unique enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format applied to serum eluted from DSS allowed the simultaneous discrimination between infections caused by HIV-1 B, HIV-1 non-B, HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2. Together, this serotyping assay and an immunoassay for recent infection were used for a virological surveillance linked to the anonymous mandatory notification of HIV infection in France. The preliminary results of this virological surveillance allowed us to obtain estimates of the prevalence of the rare variants HIV-2 and HIV-1 group O. It also allowed identification of the two first cases of M/O dual infections reported outside the endemic group O region of the western part of equatorial Africa, and showed that non-B subtypes circulate widely in France, almost 50% of new HIV diagnoses in 2003 being due to these variants.
    Journal of Medical Virology 02/2006; 78 Suppl 1:S13-8. · 2.37 Impact Factor