J H Ehrich

Hannover Medical School, Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany

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Publications (268)1100.34 Total impact

  • The Journal of pediatrics. 08/2014; 165(2):424-426.e2.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The attainment of normal growth and maturation remains a major challenge in the management of children and adolescents requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: We compared growth and maturation in 384 German children with RRT who were followed between 1998 and 2009 with 732 children who were enrolled in the European Dialysis and Transplant Association (EDTA) Registry from 1985 to 1988; of these children, 78 and 88 %, respectively, were transplanted. RESULTS: The data on the German patients included in the EDTA registry did not differ significantly from those of the patients from other European countries. Overall, the mean height standard deviation score (SDS) has improved over the past 20 years from -3.03 to -1.80 (p < 0.001). Until the age of 6 years, the difference in height SDS was not significant, whereas it improved significantly in adolescence (-3.40 vs. -1.52; p < 0.001). Significant improvements in the delay of the pubertal growth spurt, age at menarche, bone maturation and body mass index (BMI) were noted in the recent German group compared to the EDTA group (each p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate a marked improvement of growth and maturation in paediatric patients on RRT during the past 20 years.
    Pediatric Nephrology 05/2013; · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Western European health systems are not keeping pace with changes in child health needs. Non-communicable diseases are increasingly common causes of childhood illness and death. Countries are responding to changing needs by adapting child health services in different ways and useful insights can be gained through comparison, especially because some have better outcomes, or have made more progress, than others. Although overall child health has improved throughout Europe, wide inequities remain. Health services and social and cultural determinants contribute to differences in health outcomes. Improvement of child health and reduction of suffering are achievable goals. Development of systems more responsive to evolving child health needs is likely to necessitate reconfiguring of health services as part of a whole-systems approach to improvement of health. Chronic care services and first-contact care systems are important aspects. The Swedish and Dutch experiences of development of integrated systems emphasise the importance of supportive policies backed by adequate funding. France, the UK, Italy, and Germany offer further insights into chronic care services in different health systems. First-contact care models and the outcomes they deliver are highly variable. Comparisons between systems are challenging. Important issues emerging include the organisation of first-contact models, professional training, arrangements for provision of out-of-hours services, and task-sharing between doctors and nurses. Flexible first-contact models in which child health professionals work closely together could offer a way to balance the need to provide expertise with ready access. Strategies to improve child health and health services in Europe necessitate a whole-systems approach in three interdependent systems—practice (chronic care models, first-contact care, competency standards for child health professionals), plans (child health indicator sets, reliable systems for capture and analysis of data, scale-up of child health research, anticipation of future child health needs), and policy (translation of high-level goals into actionable policies, open and transparent accountability structures, political commitment to delivery of improvements in child health and equity throughout Europe).
    The Lancet 03/2013; · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Western European health systems are not keeping pace with changes in child health needs. Non-communicable diseases are increasingly common causes of childhood illness and death. Countries are responding to changing needs by adapting child health services in different ways and useful insights can be gained through comparison, especially because some have better outcomes, or have made more progress, than others. Although overall child health has improved throughout Europe, wide inequities remain. Health services and social and cultural determinants contribute to differences in health outcomes. Improvement of child health and reduction of suffering are achievable goals. Development of systems more responsive to evolving child health needs is likely to necessitate reconfiguring of health services as part of a whole-systems approach to improvement of health. Chronic care services and first-contact care systems are important aspects. The Swedish and Dutch experiences of development of integrated systems emphasise the importance of supportive policies backed by adequate funding. France, the UK, Italy, and Germany offer further insights into chronic care services in different health systems. First-contact care models and the outcomes they deliver are highly variable. Comparisons between systems are challenging. Important issues emerging include the organisation of first-contact models, professional training, arrangements for provision of out-of-hours services, and task-sharing between doctors and nurses. Flexible first-contact models in which child health professionals work closely together could offer a way to balance the need to provide expertise with ready access. Strategies to improve child health and health services in Europe necessitate a whole-systems approach in three interdependent systems-practice (chronic care models, first-contact care, competency standards for child health professionals), plans (child health indicator sets, reliable systems for capture and analysis of data, scale-up of child health research, anticipation of future child health needs), and policy (translation of high-level goals into actionable policies, open and transparent accountability structures, political commitment to delivery of improvements in child health and equity throughout Europe).
    The Lancet 03/2013; · 39.21 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of pediatrics 03/2013; 162(3):659-60. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of pediatrics 08/2012; 161(2):374-5. · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While large numbers of proteomic biomarkers have been described, they are generally not implemented in medical practice. We have investigated the reasons for this shortcoming, focusing on hurdles downstream of biomarker verification, and describe major obstacles and possible solutions to ease valid biomarker implementation. Some of the problems lie in suboptimal biomarker discovery and validation, especially lack of validated platforms with well-described performance characteristics to support biomarker qualification. These issues have been acknowledged and are being addressed, raising the hope that valid biomarkers may start accumulating in the foreseeable future. However, successful biomarker discovery and qualification alone does not suffice for successful implementation. Additional challenges include, among others, limited access to appropriate specimens and insufficient funding, the need to validate new biomarker utility in interventional trials, and large communication gaps between the parties involved in implementation. To address this problem, we propose an implementation roadmap. The implementation effort needs to involve a wide variety of stakeholders (clinicians, statisticians, health economists, and representatives of patient groups, health insurance, pharmaceutical companies, biobanks, and regulatory agencies). Knowledgeable panels with adequate representation of all these stakeholders may facilitate biomarker evaluation and guide implementation for the specific context of use. This approach may avoid unwarranted delays or failure to implement potentially useful biomarkers, and may expedite meaningful contributions of the biomarker community to healthcare.
    European Journal of Clinical Investigation 03/2012; 42(9):1027-36. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in children with diarrhoea associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (D+HUS) and cerebral involvement was evaluated retrospectively. DWI within 24 h of onset of neurological symptoms. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in grey/white matter and correlated with clinical and laboratory findings. DWI was abnormal in all. Abnormal ADC was detected in the supratentorial white matter (6/12) and cortex (1/12), the basal ganglia (5/12), the thalami (4/12), and the cerebellum (1/12). ADC was reduced in 5/12, increased in 4/12, and both in 3/12. Mean serum sodium was lower in patients with DWI abnormalities affecting the white matter (6/12), than in those with basal ganglia/thalamic involvement (6/12). Neurological outcome was normal in 4/11 and abnormal in 7/11, and 1 patient died, outcome did not correlate to either localisation or type of DWI abnormality. In D+HUS with neurological symptoms, early DWI may reveal abnormal ADC not only in the basal ganglia/thalami, but also in the white matter/cortex. Besides thrombotic microangiopathy, toxic effects of shiga toxin, azotaemia and hyponatraemia / hypoosmolality may be involved in cerebral involvement in children with D+HUS. Findings on early MRI seem not to predict clinical course or outcome. KEY POINTS : • DWI MR imaging may detect early CNS involvement in haemolytic uraemic syndrome • Different pathogenetical mechanisms may contribute to the CNS disease in HUS • Early MRI findings do not seem to allow prediction of clinical outcome.
    European Radiology 03/2012; 22(3):506-13. · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, grade IV or V) is a risk factor for renal scarring, impaired renal function, and arterial hypertension. Voiding cystourethrography is the gold standard for detecting the severity of VUR. High-grade VUR is present in the minority of children with urinary tract infection (UTI), thus exposing the majority to invasive diagnostics that have no surgical consequence. We therefore aimed at establishing a noninvasive test to identify children with high-grade VUR. In a case-control study, a specific urinary proteome pattern was established by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry in 18 patients with primary VUR grade IV or V, distinguishing these from 19 patients without VUR after UTI. This proteome pattern was independently validated in a blinded cohort of 17 patients with VUR grade IV or V and 19 patients without VUR. Sensitivity in detecting VUR grade IV or V in the blinded study was 88%, specificity was 79%. The test's accuracy was independent of age, gender, and grade of VUR in the contralateral kidney. The odds ratio of suffering from VUR grade IV or V when tested positive was 28 (95% confidence interval: 4.5 to 176.0). This noninvasive test is ready for prospective validation in large cohorts with the aim of identifying those children with UTI and hydronephrosis in need of further invasive diagnostics, such as voiding cystourethrography, thus sparing most children without pathologic urinary proteome patterns from additional diagnostics.
    PEDIATRICS 02/2012; 129(2):e356-63. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alport syndrome inevitably leads to end-stage renal disease and there are no therapies known to improve outcome. Here we determined whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can delay time to dialysis and improve life expectancy in three generations of Alport families. Patients were categorized by renal function at the initiation of therapy and included 33 with hematuria or microalbuminuria, 115 with proteinuria, 26 with impaired renal function, and 109 untreated relatives. Patients were followed for a period whose mean duration exceeded two decades. Untreated relatives started dialysis at a median age of 22 years. Treatment of those with impaired renal function significantly delayed dialysis to a median age of 25, while treatment of those with proteinuria delayed dialysis to a median age of 40. Significantly, no patient with hematuria or microalbuminuria advanced to renal failure so far. Sibling pairs confirmed these results, showing that earlier therapy in younger patients significantly delayed dialysis by 13 years compared to later or no therapy in older siblings. Therapy significantly improved life expectancy beyond the median age of 55 years of the no-treatment cohort. Thus, Alport syndrome is treatable with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition to delay renal failure and therapy improves life expectancy in a time-dependent manner. This supports the need for early diagnosis and early nephroprotective therapy in oligosymptomatic patients.
    Kidney International 12/2011; 81(5):494-501. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • Jutta Gellermann, Jochen H H Ehrich, Uwe Querfeld
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    ABSTRACT: There is currently no established standard for maintenance therapy of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). We report the long-term clinical course, medication, pharmacokinetic data, and renal function of 23 children with primary, non-familial SRNS with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). To achieve initial remission, patients were treated with high-dose intravenous (i. v.) methylprednisolone and oral cyclosporin A (CsA). Maintenance therapy included transient alternate day oral prednisolone, CsA and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers. In 18 patients, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (adjusted to achieve blood mycophenolic acid trough concentrations > 2 μg/mL) was sequentially added, and 16 patients were converted to MMF monotherapy. During a mean follow-up time of 7.0 years (1.7-16.5 years; cumulative observation time 161 patient-years), sustained remission could be achieved in all patients. Five of 23 patients (21%) experienced 10 relapses; all responded to relapse therapy. Maintenance therapy could be permanently discontinued in seven patients (30%). After conversion from CsA to MMF, renal function improved significantly; the eGFR at last follow-up was 137 (range 106-198) mL/min × 1.73 m(2). The mean number of anti-hypertensive drugs decreased from 1.86 per patient after initial remission to 0.57 on MMF monotherapy (P < 0.002). The data of this uncontrolled retrospective study indicate that in children with SRNS/FSGS achieving initial remission, a sequential steroid-free therapy consisting of a combination of CsA and MMF followed by MMF alone (with the addition of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers), can provide sustained long-term remission, preservation of renal function and better control of blood pressure.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 10/2011; 27(5):1970-8. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children and adults with spina bifida is considerable, rising, and entirely preventable. REMOVING THE CAUSE: PREVENTION OF SPINA BIFIDA: The best prevention of CKD in spina bifida is prevention of spina bifida itself through strategies that include folate supplementation, ideally before pregnancy. THE CAUSE OF CKD: Dysfunctional bladder outlet causes febrile Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), even with clean intermittent catheterization (CIC), and subsequent renal scarring. The development of secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) increases the risk of renal scarring and CKD. FINDING THE IDEAL MARKER FOR MEASUREMENT OF RENAL FUNCTION IN SPINA BIFIDA: Creatinine-based methods are insensitive because of low muscle mass and underdeveloped musculature in the legs. Only Cystatin C-based eGFR can reliably assess global renal function in these patients. However, unilateral renal damage requires nuclear medicine scans, such as (99m)Tc DMSA. (VIDEO)URODYNAMICS STUDIES (UDS): Early treatment is recommended based on UDS with anticholinergics, CIC, and antibiotic prophylaxis when indicated. Overnight catheter drainage, Botox, and eventually augmentation cystoplasty are required for poorly compliant bladders. A continent child or one rendered continent following surgery is at a higher risk of renal damage. CONCLUSION: A multidisciplinary approach is required to reduce the burden of CKD in patients with spina bifida. The right tools have to be utilized to monitor these patients, particularly if recurrent UTIs occur. Cystatin C eGFR is preferred for monitoring renal damage in these patients, and (99m)Tc DMSA scans have to be used to detect unilateral renal scarring.
    International Urology and Nephrology 06/2011; 44(3):817-27. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • J H H Ehrich, E Schiffer, J Drube
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    ABSTRACT: Due to its accessibility and availability, ease of collection, and correlation with physiology and pathology, urine is an attractive source for clinical proteomics/peptidomics in urology and nephrology. Here, we review the published findings of a reproducible, high-resolution method for peptidome analysis of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins - ranging from 0.8 to 17.0 kDA - using samples from renal patients analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS). CE-MS identified children with urodynamically relevant ureteric junction obstruction, vesicoureteric reflux of grades IV and V, glomerulopathies, tubulopathies, and chronic kidney disease. Our analysis revealed that the incorporation of urinary proteome analysis in the initial evaluation of children with urinary tract abnormalities will avoid side effects of radiological imaging techniques, reduce costs, and increase the quality-adjusted life years in this patient population. CE-MS can be recommended for clinical prospective studies on the analysis of naturally occurring urinary peptides in children with urinary tract diseases.
    Der Urologe 02/2011; 50(2):170-9. · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • Mirja Wedekin, Jochen H H Ehrich, Lars Pape
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    ABSTRACT: MPG-EPO is a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator with a longer half-life than darbepoetin, hence requires less frequent injections. It has been successfully used in adults, but currently, there are no published data available for its use in children. This pilot study was performed to verify the effect of MPG-EPO on Hb levels in children. Twelve patients (age 6.4-17.2 yr) were treated with MPG-EPO as an individual "Heilversuch" according to German law after RTx. Five patients were switched from DA, and seven were naïve to erythropoietin. Over a period of six months, Hb levels were measured monthly. A median MPG-EPO dose of 2.5 μg/kg was administered intravenously in a single dose every four wk. The median Hb value increased in naïve patients from 9.9 to 11.2 g/dL (median, p = 0.004) and from 10.3 to 11.6 g/dL (median, p = 0.39) in patients switched from DA to MPG-EPO. No adverse events secondary to MPG-EPO therapy were detected. Our results indicate that a once-monthly injection of MPG-EPO is an effective treatment of anemia in children after renal transplantation. Larger randomized trials will have to confirm our findings.
    Pediatric Transplantation 02/2011; 15(3):329-33. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low birth weight has been identified as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We analysed perinatal parameters taken from the National Birth Certificates of 435 children with CKD stages 3-5 of different aetiology and time of onset of CKD. Diseases were classified as congenital with onset of renal disease during fetal life (n = 260; 60%), hereditary as genetically determined with onset after 3 months of life (n = 93; 21%) and acquired CKD (n = 82; 19%). The rates of prematurity and small for gestational age (SGA) were elevated in children with congenital (39.3% and 29.2%), hereditary (24.7% and 22.6%) and acquired CKD (15.5% and 29.3%); these compared to 8% (for both) in the normal population. Newborns with congenital CKD had a significantly lower gestational age [median 38 weeks, interquartile range (IQR) 36-40 weeks] than those with hereditary (39.9 weeks, IQR 37.5-40 weeks) or acquired CKD (40 weeks, IQR 38-40 weeks; P < 0.001). Median birth weight and length were lower in newborns with congenital than in hereditary and acquired diseases [2975 g (IQR 2460-3420 g) versus 3250 g (IQR 2740-3580 g) and 3260 g (IQR 2858-3685 g) (P < 0.01); 49 cm (IQR 47-52) versus 50 cm (IQR 48-52.8) and 51 cm (IQR 49-53) (P < 0.01)]. Head circumference was smaller (P < 0.05), and Apgar scores were lower (P < 0.005) in newborns with congenital diseases than in hereditary and acquired diseases. Children with congenital CKD had the highest rate of prematurity, a significantly lower birth weight, length, head circumference and Apgar score than newborns with hereditary or acquired CKD. Irrespective of the aetiology of CKD, all of the children had a significantly higher rate of SGA and prematurity than the reference population. We conclude that both SGA and prematurity predispose for advanced renal disease in childhood and that fetal kidney disease impairs fetal growth.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 12/2010; 25(12):3918-24. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The therapeutic value of protocol biopsies (PBs) in renal transplant recipients remains unclear. We performed protocol biopsies in 57 children six months after transplantation. We increased the CNI dose in patients with borderline findings. In cases of Banff grade Ia, six prednisolone IV-pulses were given and the CNI dose was increased. CNI toxicity and polyomavirus nephropathy led to a reduction in the CNI dose. GFR was compared with a control group of 51 children with no PBs transplanted in the same period. Forty-two percent of PBs had no pathological changes, 24% IF/TA. Borderline findings were detected in 11%, Banff grade Ia in 15% (CNI), toxicity in 8%, and one case showed polyomavirus nephropathy. GFR after 1.5 and 2.5 yr was similar in both groups. GFR 3.5 yr after transplantation was significantly higher in the intervention group (57 ± 17 vs. 46 ± 20). Patients treated with low-dose CNI and everolimus had a significantly lower number of pathological findings in PBs. The performance of protocol biopsies followed by a standardized treatment algorithm led to better graft function 3.5 yr after transplantation. Prospective randomized studies to confirm our findings are needed.
    Pediatric Transplantation 12/2010; 14(8):1012-8. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because of its availability, ease of collection, and correlation with physiology and pathology, urine is an attractive source for clinical proteomics/peptidomics. However, the lack of comparable data sets from large cohorts has greatly hindered the development of clinical proteomics. Here, we report the establishment of a reproducible, high resolution method for peptidome analysis of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins, ranging from 800 to 17,000 Da, using samples from 3,600 individuals analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to MS. All processed data were deposited in an Structured Query Language (SQL) database. This database currently contains 5,010 relevant unique urinary peptides that serve as a pool of potential classifiers for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. As an example, by using this source of information, we were able to define urinary peptide biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases, allowing diagnosis of these diseases with high accuracy. Application of the chronic kidney disease-specific biomarker set to an independent test cohort in the subsequent replication phase resulted in 85.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results indicate the potential usefulness of capillary electrophoresis coupled to MS for clinical applications in the analysis of naturally occurring urinary peptides.
    Molecular &amp Cellular Proteomics 11/2010; 9(11):2424-37. · 7.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The number of acute rejections and infections after pediatric kidney transplantation (KTX) could not be reduced in the last years. To reduce these events, we investigated a new immunosuppressive protocol in a prospective trial. After KTX, 20 children (median age 12 years, range 1-17) were initially treated with Basiliximab, ciclosporine A (CsA) (trough-level = C0 200-250 ng/mL) and prednisolone. After 2 weeks, CsA dose was reduced to 50% (C0 75-100 ng/mL, after 6 months: 50-75 ng/mL) and everolimus (1.6 mg/m²) /day) was started (C0 3-6 ng/mL). Six months after KTX prednisolone was set to alternate dose and stopped 3 months later. All 20 protocol biopsies 6 months after KTX showed no acute rejection or borderline findings. Indication biopsies resulted in no acute rejections and two borderline findings. Mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 1 year after KTX was 71 ± 25 mL/min/1.73 m². Without cytomegalovirus (CMV)-prophylaxis, only two primary CMV infections were seen despite a donor/recipient-CMV-constellation pos./neg. in 10/20 children. In pediatric KTX, de novo immunosuppression with low-dose CsA, everolimus and steroid withdrawal after 9 months led to promising results according to numbers of acute rejections and infections. Further follow up is needed. Future larger trials will have to confirm our findings.
    American Journal of Transplantation 10/2010; 10(10):2349-54. · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Podocytes play a key role in maintaining the blood-urine barrier for high-molecular-weight proteins. They are considered to be terminally differentiated, and podocyte loss cannot be compensated by regenerative proliferation. Various diseases leading to podocyte damage and loss result in proteinuria and cause nephrotic syndrome. Therefore, direct therapeutical strategies to protect podocytes in disease situations are a logical concept to prevent disease or to delay disease progression. Acquired podocytopathies like idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and minimal change disease are historically considered as immunological diseases. Therefore, immunosuppressive agents such as steroids and calcineurin inhibitors are the commonly used treatment strategies. However, the causative disease mechanisms behind these treatment strategies remain elusive. Recent evidence shows that immunosuppressive agents, in addition to the effect on the immune system, directly influence the unique structure and function of podocytes. In this context, the actin cytoskeleton of the podocyte and cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor play a pivotal role. In this review, we summarize the direct effects on podocytes obtained in vivo and in vitro after treatment with calcineurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and glucocorticoids. These direct effects could play a key role in the treatment concepts of podocytopathies with an important impact on the long-term renal function in patients with pharmacological immunosuppression.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 10/2010; 26(1):18-24. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) has been considered to be a standard component of pediatric apheresis therapy for more than a decade. However, data on dosing recommendations and evaluations of the effectiveness and safety of anticoagulation are rarely found in published reports. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to present our single-center experience with RCA in pediatric apheresis therapy with the aim of developing an operating procedure. Five children aged 7-14 years underwent a total of 72 (range 3-44) therapeutic apheresis sessions with RCA in the form of immunoadsorption therapy (2 patients), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis (1 patient), and plasmapheresis (two patients). A 3% citrate solution was used. Citrate flow was started at 4.0% of the blood flow velocity and was adapted to match post-filter ionized calcium levels ≤ 0.30 mmol/l. Once the patient's ionized calcium fell to <1.05 mmol/l, an intravenous 10% calcium gluconate solution was administered. Twenty pediatric apheresis patients who received standard heparinization, matched for age, body surface area, processed plasma volume, and blood flow velocity, were enrolled in the study as a comparison group. No side effects were experienced in 72 apheresis session. The 3% citrate solution had to be reduced gradually during the apheresis session and was infused at a mean of 2.8-3.8% of the blood flow rate. Serum bicarbonate levels before and after the apheresis session with RCA [23.9 (range 18.9-30.1) vs. 26.3 (20.2-33.0) mmol/l, respectively] were significantly different (p=0.013). All patients required intravenous calcium substitution to maintain serum calcium levels within the physiological range. Due to the administration of the 3% citrate solution and calcium, all patients significantly gained weight during the procedure, with a median weight gain of 2.5% (p<0.001). The extra fluid load caused problems in patients with kidney failure. Our regimen with RCA is safe, feasible, and effective in pediatric therapeutic apheresis therapy. For RCA in apheresis, we recommend (1) a citrate (3%) flow of 3.3% of the blood flow, (2) prophylactic intravenous calcium substitution from the beginning, and (3) a more highly concentrated citrate solution in the case of oliguric patients.
    Pediatric Nephrology 10/2010; 26(1):127-32. · 2.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
1,100.34 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1982–2013
    • Hannover Medical School
      • • Clinic for Paediatric Nephrology, Hepatology and Metabolic Disorders
      • • Department of Nuclear Medicine
      • • Institute for Pathology
      • • Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology
      Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2008–2011
    • Riley Hospital for Children
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • 2002–2011
    • The Children’s Medical Group
      Poughkeepsie, New York, United States
    • Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
      • Division of Pediatrics
      Beersheba, Southern District, Israel
  • 1995–2008
    • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 2005
    • University of Iowa Children's Hospital
      Iowa City, Iowa, United States
    • University of Ottawa
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • 2001
    • Max von Pettenkofer-Institut
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1999
    • Städtisches Krankenhaus Kiel
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
  • 1992–1999
    • Universität Heidelberg
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1998
    • Universitätsmedizin Göttingen
      • Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopedics
      Göttingen, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1997
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology
      Berlin, Land Berlin, Germany
  • 1993–1994
    • Universitätsklinikum Münster
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1987–1994
    • Hochschule Hannover
      Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1992–1993
    • University of Bonn
      • Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1990–1992
    • Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù
      Roma, Latium, Italy
    • University of Hamburg
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    • Universität Basel
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 1989–1990
    • University of Gezira
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Wad Medani, El Jezira, Sudan
    • Uppsala University Hospital
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
  • 1984–1990
    • Hospital Infantil de Tamaulipas
      Victoria, Guanajuato, Mexico