Mohammad Alamgir Hossain

Kagoshima University, Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan

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Publications (12)14.77 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the β-galactosidase (GLB1) gene. In feline GM1 gangliosidosis, a pathogenic mutation (c.1448G>C) in the feline GLB1 gene was identified in Siamese cats in the United States and Japan and in Korat cats in Western countries. The present study found the homozygous c.1448G>C mutation in 2 apparent littermate native kittens in Bangladesh that were exhibiting neurological signs. This is the first identification of GM1 gangliosidosis in native domestic cats in Southeast Asia. This pathogenic mutation seems to have been present in the domestic cat population in the Siamese region and may have been transferred to pure breeds such as Siamese and Korat cats originating in this region.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 11/2012; 75(3). DOI:10.1292/jvms.12-0307 · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three Japanese Black cows housed with 6 other cows exhibited main clinical symptoms of severe hemoglobinuria. Hematological analyses conducted after antibiotic therapy demonstrated severe anemia, and biochemical analyses indicated both severe hemolysis and disruption of hepatic function. One of the three cows died. Based on the above analyses and observation of typical clinical symptoms, a speculative diagnosis of bacillary hemoglobinuria was made, and immediate high-dose antibiotic treatment improved the general conditions of the surviving animals. Blood samples from the other 2 cows were collected sequentially after antibacterial therapy. Clostridium haemolyticum was detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction analysis of the blood samples. The cows were diagnosed with the second recorded occurrence of bacillary hemoglobinuria in Japan.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 02/2011; 73(2):255-8. DOI:10.1292/jvms.10-0231 · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is evidence that onions and garlic protect against cancer in humans. It has been suggested that this effect is partly due to the organosulfur compounds in Allium vegetables and that these substances act through induction of phase II detoxification enzymes. Here, we hypothesized that alk(en)yl thiosulfates, sodium n-propyl thiosulfate (NPTS), and sodium 2-propenyl thiosulfate (2PTS), which were identified in onions and garlic, respectively, may induce phase II enzymes. Therefore, rat hepatoma cells (H4IIE) were cultured with 1 to 100 micromol/L of NPTS or 2PTS for 48 hours at 37 degrees C; and the activities and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of phase II enzymes in H4IIE cells were investigated. The effects of diallyl trisulfide and tert-butylhydroquinone, known as phase II inducers, were also examined as positive controls and compared with the responses of NPTS and 2PTS. Quinone reductase (QR) activity and mRNA expression levels of QR and epoxide hydrolase 1 were significantly increased by 2PTS (P < .05-.005). In particular, QR activity was increased at a relatively low concentration of 2PTS (10 micromol/L). However, glutathione S-transferase activity and mRNA expression levels of glutathione S-transferase A5 and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 were not changed by 2PTS. In contrast, NPTS did not affect the activities and mRNA expression levels of these phase II enzymes. These results show that 2PTS can induce phase II enzymes, and its inductive effect is comparable or superior to that of diallyl trisulfide and tert-butylhydroquinone.
    Nutrition research 06/2010; 30(6):435-40. DOI:10.1016/j.nutres.2010.06.007 · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Umbilical hernias in calves commonly present to veterinary clinics, which are normally secondary to failure of the normal closure of the umbilical ring, and which result in the protrusion of abdominal contents into the overlying subcutis. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of commonly-used herniorrhaphies for the treatment of reducible umbilical hernia in calves. Thirty-four clinical cases presenting to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh from July 2004 to July 2007 were subjected to comprehensive study including history, classification of hernias, size of the hernial rings, presence of adhesion with the hernial sacs, postoperative care and follow-up. They were reducible, non-painful and had no evidence of infection present on palpation. The results revealed a gender influence, with the incidence of umbilical hernia being higher in female calves than in males. Out of the 34 clinical cases, 14 were treated by open method of herniorrhaphy and 20 were treated by closed method. Complications of hernia were higher (21%) in open method-treated cases than in closed method-treated cases (5%). Hernia recurred in three calves treated with open herniorrhaphy within 2 weeks of the procedure, with swelling in situ and muscular weakness at the site of operation. Shorter operation time and excellent healing rate (80%) were found in calves treated with closed herniorrhaphy. These findings suggest that the closed herniorrhaphy is better than the commonly-used open method for the correction of reducible umbilical hernia in calves.
    Journal of veterinary science (Suwŏn-si, Korea) 12/2009; 10(4):343-7. DOI:10.4142/jvs.2009.10.4.343 · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the effects of infected culture supernatant of erythrocytes, fractionation of culture supernatant and serum from dogs infected with Babesia gibsoni (B. gibsoni) on the maturation of canine reticulocytes in vitro. The SDS-PAGE demonstrated that significantly broader bands were generated by both the infected culture supernatant of erythrocytes and the serum from dogs chronically infected with B. gibsoni. The culture supernatant of erythrocytes infected with B. gibsoni strongly suppressed the maturation of reticulocytes. Prior studies showed that chronically infected serum had inhibitory effects on both the maturation of reticulocytes and the canine pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase subclass I and purine-specific 5'-nucleotidase activity. In addition, serum free infected culture supernatant of erythrocytes had an inhibitory effect on the morphological maturation of reticulocytes. These results suggest that infected serum and culture supernatant of erythrocytes might accumulate excess proteins and/or metabolites as a result of the inhibited maturation of reticulocytes and decreased activity of erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase. Furthermore, the fractions observed at >150 kDa- and 150-70 kDa- in the infected culture supernatant and serum retarded the maturation of canine reticulocytes in vitro. The results obtained from the in vitro examinations, in the present study, suggested that B. gibsoni itself and/or its metabolites might release certain proteins in the infected culture supernatant and serum from infected dogs and as a result delay morphological maturation of canine reticulocytes.
    Journal of Veterinary Science 07/2007; 8(2):169-74. DOI:10.4142/jvs.2007.8.2.169 · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • Mohammad Alamgir Hossain, Osamu Yamato, Masahiro Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu Maede
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was conducted to determine the cause of low parasitemia and simultaneous reticulocytosis in canine babesiosis. The parasitemia was significantly decreased in in vitro cultures of Babesia gibsoni by the pretreatment of host canine erythrocytes with lead acetate, which is a specific inhibitor of pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase subclass I (P5N-I). The serum from dogs chronically infected with B. gibsoni did not decrease the activities of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in canine reticulocytes, although it was previously reported that this serum had inhibitory effects on both the maturation of reticulocytes and the canine P5N-I and purine-specific 5'-nucleotidase activities. Furthermore, the in vitro multiplication of B. gibsoni was significantly inhibited by pyrimidine nucleotides such as cytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-CMP), which is preferentially catalyzed by P5N-I and also inhibits the morphological maturation of canine reticulocytes. Purine nucleotides such as inosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) also had an inhibitory effect on the multiplication of this parasite. These results suggest that nucleotides such as 5'-CMP and 5'-IMP might accumulate in young erythrocytes and/or serum in dogs infected with B. gibsoni as a result of the decreased activity of erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase, and the accumulation of these nucleotides might inhibit the multiplication of this parasite and simultaneously retard the maturation of reticulocytes. The results obtained from the in vitro examinations in the present study may partially clarify the relationship between low parasitemia and simultaneous reticulocytosis in vivo in canine babesiosis.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 05/2004; 66(4):389-95. DOI:10.1292/jvms.66.389 · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase is thought to be involved in the maturation of erythrocytes. In the present study, in vitro incubation of canine erythrocytes demonstrated that significant inhibition of 5'-nucleotidase activity occurred in the presence of serum from dogs infected with Babesia gibsoni, when the enzyme was assayed with cytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-CMP) and inosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) as substrates. The multiplication of B. gibsoni in in vitro culture also resulted in a significant decrease in the enzyme activity of erythrocytes in the culture. Furthermore, the infected serum and 5'-CMP retarded the maturation of canine reticulocytes in vitro. These results suggested that nucleotides such as 5'-CMP and 5'-IMP might accumulate in young erythrocytes and/or serum in dogs infected with B. gibsoni as a result of decreased activity of erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase, resulting in the delayed maturation of reticulocytes.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 01/2004; 65(12):1281-6. DOI:10.1292/jvms.65.1281 · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To clarify the cause of the predilection of Babesia gibsoni for reticulocytes and canine HK erythrocytes (containing high concentrations of potassium) with inherited high concentrations of some amino acids, including glutamate, 4 enzymes in B. gibsoni parasites were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The enzymes, i.e., hexokinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), were found to be associated with B. gibsoni parasites. The parasite-specific enzymes were shown to have different mobility patterns in PAGE from those found in normal canine erythrocytes. GDH, which is able to oxidize glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate, an intermediate in the citric acid cycle in mitochondria, was detected only in the parasites. Electron microscopy of the parasites revealed double-membraned organelles similar to mitochondria in their cytoplasm. The parasites in in vitro culture contained many more mitochondrialike organelles than those in the peripheral blood of infected dogs. In addition, the size of parasites cultured in vitro was significantly larger than that of parasites in the peripheral blood. Based on these results, it is suggested that B. gibsoni may use glucose as an energy source in its own glycolytic pathway. Moreover, the parasite may also be capable of oxidizing glutamate via GDH in the citric acid cycle, which may operate in the mitochondrialike organelles within the parasite. This may explain the predilection of B. gibsoni for canine reticulocytes and HK erythrocytes with a high concentration of glutamate.
    Journal of Parasitology 01/2004; 89(6):1142-6. DOI:10.1645/GE-86R · 1.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sodium 2-propenyl thiosulfate was identified in boiled garlic (Allium sativum). When canine erythrocytes were incubated with sodium 2-propenyl thiosulfate, the methemoglobin concentration and Heinz body percentage in erythrocytes were both increased, indicating that the compound induced oxidative damage in canine erythrocytes. It seems that this compound is one of the causative agents of garlic-induced hemolysis in dogs.
    Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry 08/2003; 67(7):1594-6. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine substrate specificity and susceptibility to lead, erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase was measured in dogs, cats, cattle and humans, and its relationship to the reticulocyte count in these species was determined. The reticulocyte count in dogs was similar to that in humans, but the count in cats was higher than that in humans. Reticulocytes were not observed in cattle. The activities of canine erythrocyte 5'-nucleotidase measured using cytidine and uridine 5'-monophosphates, which are preferentially catalyzed by one of the human pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase isozymes (P5N-I), were similar to those of the human enzyme. The canine enzyme preferentially catalyzed thymidine 3'-monophosphate, which is catalyzed only by human P5N-II, more strongly than the human enzyme. This suggests that canine erythrocytes have two isozymes similar to human P5N-I and P5N-II, and a higher P5N-II-like activity than human erythrocytes. Feline erythrocytes had the highest level of P5N-I-like activity among the species examined, and the bovine enzymic activities including those of P5N-I and II were the lowest among these species. According to these observations, the reticulocyte count was approximately proportional to the P5N-I-like activity in these species. Therefore, the P5N-I-like activity may be involved in the morphological maturation of mammalian erythrocytes. The canine and feline erythrocytes had markedly high activity and preferentially catalyzed purine 5'-monophosphate suggesting the presence of a purine-specific 5'-nucleotidase as in human erythrocytes. In addition, the canine and feline P5N-I-like activity showed less susceptibility to lead than the human P5N-I. This may be a reason why there are few case reports of lead-induced anemia in dogs and cats.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 03/2003; 65(2):193-7. DOI:10.1292/jvms.65.193 · 0.88 Impact Factor
  • Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry 01/2003; 67(7):1594-1596. DOI:10.1271/bbb.67.1594 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the cause of the predilection of Babesia gibsoni for reticulocytes, the parasites were cultivated with various types of reconstituted erythrocyte ghosts, which were prepared by resealing erythrocyte ghosts together with variously treated erythrocyte lysate, in vitro. The level of parasitemia in the culture with reconstituted reticulocyte ghosts containing untreated reticulocyte lysate was significantly higher than that in the culture with reconstituted normocyte (mature erythrocyte) ghosts containing untreated normocyte lysate. The removal of mitochondria from reconstituted reticulocyte ghosts by filtration or centrifugation resulted in decreased of parasitemia in those cultures. In contrast, when mitochondria from reticulocytes were loaded into reconstituted normocyte ghosts, the parasitemia in the ghosts loaded mitochondria was increased to the same level as that in reconstituted reticulocyte ghosts. Furthermore, the parsitemia in the culture with reconstituted normocyte ghosts was proportional to the concentration of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the ghosts. These results suggested that mitochondria of reticulocytes might enhance the multiplication of B. gibsoni through the generation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate within the cells.
    Experimental Parasitology 11/2002; 102(3-4):164-9. DOI:10.1016/S0014-4894(03)00052-3 · 1.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

51 Citations
14.77 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2012
    • Kagoshima University
      • Faculty of Agriculture
      Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 2007–2009
    • Chungbuk National University
      • College of Veterinary Medicine
      Chinsen, Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea
  • 2002–2004
    • Hokkaido University
      • Laboratory of Internal Medicine
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan