H R Ham

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Pierre, Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium

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Publications (145)376.95 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney failure is frequently seen in middle-aged and elderly cats. 51Chromium-ethylene diaminic tetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance and single blood sample (SBS) method are used in several species to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The hypothesis of this study was that 51Cr-EDTA clearance could be determined using an SBS method in normal and hyperthyroid cats. Forty-six cats were included in this study, with an average age of 9.5 years. Of these cats, 27 had hyperthyroidism; 19 were healthy. After IV injection of 51Cr-EDTA (average dose: 4.25 MBq), 7 blood samples were obtained between 5 and 240 minutes. Reference clearance was calculated in mL/min and mL/min/kg body weight, using a 2-compartment model. Optimal time for clearance measurement with SBS was then determined by systematically comparing each individual plasma concentration to the reference multisample clearance. The average reference plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA for all cats was 14.9 mL/min (3.7 mL/min/kg). The clearance in hyperthyroid cats averaged 16.4 mL/min (4.3 mL/min/kg) and in normal cats averaged 10.3 mL/min (2.4 mL/min/kg). The optimal time for the SBS was 48 minutes after injection of tracer 51Cr-EDTA (R2= 0.9414), giving the following converting equation: clearance = (0.0066 x DV48 minutes) - 0.9277 (in mL/min). In this study, the single sample 51Cr-EDTA clearance method was used to estimate the global GFR in cats. The method identified differences in clearance between normal and hyperthyroid cats. The optimal time for an SBS was 48 minutes.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 02/2008; 22(2):266-72. · 2.06 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of Urology 03/2004; 171(2 Pt 1):806. · 3.70 Impact Factor
  • Nuclear Medicine Communications 02/2004; 25(1):87-8. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate Rutland's method for the recovery of renal retention function without deconvolution. Renograms (n=5800) were generated by convolving 10 real input functions with 580 artificially created retention functions. Their ratios of minimal to mean transit time ranged from 0.1 to 1.0, and for mean transit time ranged from 3 to 60 min. The retention function was recovered from each renogram and its associated input function by calculating the first derivative of the residence time of the tracer in the kidney. Minimal, mean, and maximal transit time of the recovered retention function were calculated and compared with the original values. Qualitatively, the recovered retention function differed little from the original one. Quantitatively, values for recovered minimal transit time equalled original minimal transit time in all cases, whilst recovered mean transit time and maximal transit time equalled, respectively, the original mean transit time and maximal transit time if the original minimal to mean transit time ratio equalled 1. If this ratio was less than 1, recovered mean transit time was higher than original mean transit time and recovered maximal transit time was lower than original maximal transit time. For values of mean and maximal transit time, the differences from the original value increased with increasing original mean and maximal transit time, respectively, and with increasing renal clearance and decreasing minimal to mean transit time ratio. It is confirmed that Rutland's method is a particularly interesting alternative to deconvolution analysis. The errors that occur when recovering the retention function are relatively small.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 11/2003; 24(10):1097-103. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • A. PIEPSZ, H. R. HAM
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    ABSTRACT: An abstract is unavailable. This article is available as HTML full text and PDF.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 04/2002; 23(5):501-503. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the physiological changes of gastric emptying on the simplified 14C-urea breath test. Thirty patients performed the test in fasting conditions. Patients were orally administered 0.074 mega Bq of 14C-urea, mixed with 0.0185 mega Bq of 99mTc-S colloids in 25 ml water. A breath sample was taken before and 10 min after intake of the tracers and followed by a 2 min planar anterior scintigraphic image of the abdomen to measure gastric activity. Gastric emptying was estimated by dividing the residual gastric activity at 10 min by the total activity in the abdomen. The procedure was performed twice for each patient after a 24 h interval. The repeatability of both the gastric emptying test and the urea breath test was assessed by the method described by Bland and Altman. The coefficient of repeatability of the urea breath test was 1.18 for a confidence interval of 95%. The coefficient of repeatability of gastric emptying was 27.4. There was no significant correlation (r= 0.08) between the plot of the individual modifications of urea breath test and residual gastric activity in two successive tests. It is concluded that the physiological changes of gastric emptying do not influence the results obtained by the simplified, single-sample 14C-urea breath test.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 03/2002; 23(2):171-4. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to evaluate prospectively the proportion of children with a clinical and biological presentation of acute pyelonephritis, abnormal Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy and negative or equivocal urine cultures. All patients aged 6 weeks to 15 years suspected of acute pyelonephritis (APN) were admitted to the Paediatric Department and underwent Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy within 3 days after admission and at 6 months. Of 166 patients enrolled in the study, 15 (9%) had negative or equivocal urine culture despite clinical and scintigraphic evidence of APN. Of these 15 children, renal ultrasound was normal in 7 patients and vesicoureteric reflux was found in 9 patients. Control DMSA 6 months after acute episode showed the disappearance of cortical lesions in eight and partial improvement in four patients. In this prospective series, as many as 9% of patients with APN would have been missed on the basis of equivocal or negative urine cultures. It is suggested that Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy should be performed in children with severe infection without clear aetiology, especially in those with abnormal urinalysis.
    Pediatric Nephrology 07/2001; 16(6):503-6. · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 06/2001; 53(6):700-1. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma clearance rate of 51Cr-EDTA estimated by using one blood sample is commonly used for the calculation of glomerular filtration rate. To estimate the error on single-sample clearance determination induced by errors in sampling time and activity measurement, and to compare it with the error observed on the clearance determination obtained using the slope-intercept method. Forty-five adult patients were chosen from a data base of 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance values determined by using two blood samples taken around 2 and 4 h. Patients were selected in such a way as to include clearances from 30 ml.min-1 to 155 ml.min-1, with steps of 3 ml.min-1. Based on the slope and the intercept of the slope with the y-axis, the plasma concentration at exactly 2 and 4 h was determined. Normally distributed random errors were then introduced in the sampling time (SD of 0, 1 and 2 min) as well as in the activity measurement (SD of 0, 1, 2 and 5%). Then, clearance was calculated using two single-sample methods (i.e. the algorithms of Groth and Tauxe), and the slope-intercept method, which requires two blood samples. For each setting, the simulation was repeated 200 times. The effects on clearance of a random error on the time sampling and/or the activity measurement were then evaluated. The error on single-sample clearance induced by a 2 min error in sampling time associated with a 5% error in activity measurement was negligible. For all clearance levels, the SD of the error on the calculated clearance was less than 3.8 ml.min-1. Whatever algorithm was chosen, the errors on the single-sample clearance were systematically lower than those observed with the slope-intercept method, for the whole clearance range. Errors in sampling time and in activity measurement induced only a very small error on the single-sample EDTA clearance, which is systematically lower compared to that observed on the slope-intercept method using two blood samples.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 05/2001; 22(4):429-32. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was performed to assess the impact of precise timing and the repeatability of the simplified 10-min 14C-urea breath test. Thirty-three patients underwent a 14C-urea breath test at 10 and 12 min (test I) and after 24 h (test II). The paired t-test was applied to assess differences between two successive measurements at 10 and 12 min, and the method of Bland and Altman was used to evaluate the repeatability of the test. Only test I (P = 0.004) showed a significant difference between two successive measurements at 10 and 12 min. The coefficients of repeatability at 10 and 12 min were 1.54 and 1.48, respectively. No bias was found. From this study, we can conclude that breath collections, delayed by 2 min (20% error), have no impact on the clinical interpretation of the results. The repeatability of the simplified 10-min 14C-urea breath test is sufficient for clinical use.
    Journal of Gastroenterology 04/2001; 36(3):187-9. · 3.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the attitude of Belgian pediatricians toward the management and treatment of children with suspected acute pyelonephritis, a short letter was sent to all Belgian pediatricians (1,200). It contained a brief description of a clinical case strongly suggestive of acute pyelonephritis followed by a series of questions centered on complementary examinations to be performed, need of hospitalization and treatment. A total of 583 responses were received (49%). In the acute phase, 99% of pediatricians perform urine cultures, 87% blood examinations, and 76% renal ultrasound. Dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA) scintigraphy is performed during the acute phase by 37% and during follow-up by 32% of all pediatricians. A voiding cystogram is requested by 71%. Ambulatory treatment is considered by 30% of responders. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (44%) and trimethoprim/sulfonamide (22%) are the most frequently used oral antibiotics. Private pediatricians perform fewer examinations and more frequently consider ambulatory treatment of acute pyelonephritis, compared to pediatricians working in hospitals. Among Belgian pediatricians, attitudes toward the diagnosis and treatment of acute pyelonephritis are heterogeneous. This survey underlines the need for properly documented prospective studies for the evaluation of different treatment modalities in childhood acute pyelonephritis.
    Pediatric Nephrology 03/2001; 16(2):113-5. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The best timing and the best cut-off level of the 13C-urea breath test have not yet been well established. To evaluate the cut-off value and the influence of medication on the 13C-urea breath test as measured by infrared spectrometry. A series of 223 patients, sent for endoscopy performed 13C-urea breath test in fasting conditions with 75 mg of 13C-urea and 20 ml of citric acid. Breath samples were collected before and then 10, 20, 25 and 30 minutes after ingestion. As gold standard, histological examination of gastric biopsies was used. A questionnaire was completed concerning the intake of medication, likely to influence the test, in the 2 months preceding the test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value at 10, 20, 25 and 30 minutes at different cut-off values (3, 3. 5, 4, 4. 5, 5.0 0/00 DOB] were calculated. A total of 182 patients did not take medication. There was no significant difference between the different cut-off levels at different times. Compared with the group of 41 patients who did take medication, likely to influence the test, the differences were significant (Fisher exact test). There was no significant difference between the different cut-off values. A 10-minute test with a cut-off level between 4 and 5% delta over baseline (sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 95%) is, therefore, proposed. To avoid false negative results due to unknown intake of medication, every patient submitted to the 13C-urea breath test should fill out a questionnaire.
    Digestive and Liver Disease 02/2001; 33(1):30-5. · 3.16 Impact Factor
  • Nuclear Medicine Communications 01/2001; 21(12):1160-2. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Nuclear Medicine Communications - NUCL MED COMMUN. 01/2001; 22(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Mono-compartmental analysis based on 2- and 4-h blood samples (BS) of 51Cr-EDTA (EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) is commonly used for the calculation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The purposes of this study were to estimate the magnitude of error in clearance induced by errors in the time of sampling and activity measurement; to estimate the impact of changing the interval between the BS; and to assess the influence of a higher number of BS in reducing the error. A model of mono-exponential curves based on a finite number of BS was created. Normally distributed random errors were introduced in the time of sampling and activity measurement. In a first step, three different time intervals were used; in a second step, seven different numbers of BS were used, all taken between 120 and 240 min. For each setting, the random errors were successively introduced 200 times and the coefficients of variation (CV) of the calculated clearances were determined. Variable errors in clearance were induced by errors in the time of sampling and activity measurement. In general, the observed errors were higher for high and low clearance, with lower errors for moderately reduced clearances. The errors in indicating the time of sampling played an important role for high clearance, whereas the errors in activity measurements led to important errors for low clearance. Prolonging the interval from 1 to 2 h resulted generally in an important decrease in error, except in the range 60-100 ml x min(-1). Prolonging the interval from 2 to 3 h resulted in only a small additional decrease in error, except for very low clearance. Errors in indicating the time of sampling and in activity measurements induce errors in clearance determination. These errors cannot be significantly reduced by simply increasing the number of BS or by prolonging the interval between the samples. It is probably better, in most cases, to keep using the 2-4-h method and to take extreme care when indicating the time of sampling and when measuring the activity, instead of increasing the number of samples or lengthening the procedure.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 09/2000; 21(8):741-5. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors describe various patterns of Tc-99m DMSA images that correspond to a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. Only those children with complete scintigraphic healing or considerable improvement after 6 months have been considered.
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine 08/2000; 25(7):541-5. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 13C urea breath test (13C-UBT) is the most convenient method for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection noninvasively. Nondispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometry (NDIRS) is an inexpensive and easy alternative to mass spectrometry. The objective of this study was to evaluate: (1) the reproducibility of the 13C-UBT as performed by using the NDIRS method; (2) the repeatability of bags analysis and the impact of delayed analysis; and (3) the need for fasting status for the 13C-UBT. The 13C-UBT was performed with 75 mg urea labeled with 13C, with breath samples collected at times 0 and 30 minutes. Results are expressed as delta over baseline (0/00). Fifty-three patients underwent two successive 13C-UBTs with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The 106 collected bags were randomly reanalyzed immediately or 72 hours later. In 26 volunteer subjects, the 13C-UBT was performed both in a fasting condition and after a nonstandardized meal. The reproducibility was assessed by the method of Bland and Altman. The mean of difference between two successive tests was 0. 14 0/00 (standard deviation, 0.90), and the coefficient of repeatability was 1.80 (confidence interval, 95%). The difference between two successive analyses was always less than 2.2% of the initial value. The coefficient of variation between two successive tests for the influence of a meal was 11.24. The 13C-UBT as performed by using NDIRS is reproducible, analyses can be delayed up to 72 hours, and the test must be performed in fasting conditions.
    Helicobacter 07/2000; 5(2):104-8. · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that the slope of the second exponential of the plasma disappearance curve may be used to monitor changes in renal function instead of plasma clearance calculated using the slope-intercept method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of error in the slope induced by errors in sampling time and in activity measurement, and to compare it with the error observed in clearance. A model of mono-exponential curves based on two blood samples, taken at 120 and 240 min, was created. Normally distributed random errors were introduced into the sampling times and activity measurements. For each setting, the random errors were successively introduced 200 times and the coefficients of variation of the calculated slopes and clearances were determined. Variable errors in slope and clearance were induced by errors in sampling time and activity measurement. In general, the observed errors in the slope were high in the case of low slope values, decreasing progressively for increasing slope values. The errors in clearance followed a different pattern: highest errors were observed in the case of very low clearance, decreasing progressively for higher clearance values and attaining the minimal value at a lambda around 0.006 min-1, which corresponds to clearance of about 90 ml.min-1. The magnitude of the errors then started to increase again for higher clearance. For a large range of clearance values, the errors in the slope were higher than the errors in clearance. The only exceptions were cases with very high clearance rates. In conclusion, clearance calculation using the slope-intercept method should be preferred to that using the slope alone for monitoring changes in renal function.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 06/2000; 21(5):455-8. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate two formulae allowing the determination of MAG3 clearance by means of a single blood sample, namely Bubeck's formula and Russell's formula. As a first step, a simulation study was performed with the two single-sample algorithms to predict MAG3 clearance as a function of plasma concentration, using various times for blood sampling and various body surface areas. As a second step, a validation study on 47 adult patients with varying renal function allowed a clinical comparison between the reference technique, namely the multiple blood sample technique, and the two simplified techniques. The simplified algorithms were calculated using the fitted value at 44 min. In the simulation study, whatever the time of blood sampling or the level of correction introduced for body surface area, the results obtained by means of Bubeck's algorithm diverged significantly from those of Russell's algorithm, for low clearance values as well as for high clearance values. The curve of the differences between the two methods had a typical boomerang shape. In the clinical study, the difference between Russell's algorithm and the reference method was generally within 20 ml.min-1, with no systematic bias; with Bubeck's algorithm there was a marked underestimation, both in the low and high clearance ranges. We suggest Russell's single-sample method is the method of choice.
    Nuclear Medicine Communications 02/2000; 21(1):65-9. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • The American Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2000; 95(1):316. · 7.55 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

700 Citations
376.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1987–2003
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Pierre
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 1984–2002
    • Free University of Brussels
      • • Department of Gastroenterology
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Nuclear Medicine (NUGE)
      Brussels, BRU, Belgium
  • 1988–1990
    • Hôpital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium