Lisa F Barcellos

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States

Are you Lisa F Barcellos?

Claim your profile

Publications (134)988.85 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The recently described interaction between smoking, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1*15 and absence of HLA-A*02 with regard to multiple sclerosis (MS) risk shows that the risk conveyed by smoking differs depending on genetic background. We aimed to investigate whether a similar interaction exists between passive smoking and HLA genotype.
    International journal of epidemiology. 10/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To investigate the association between obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS) while accounting for established genetic and environmental risk factors. Methods Participants included members of Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Plan, Northern California Region (KPNC) (1235 MS cases and 697 controls). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Body mass index (BMI) or body size was the primary predictor of each model. Both incident and prevalent MS cases were studied. Results In analyses stratified by gender, being overweight at ages 10 and 20 were associated with MS in females (p < 0.01). Estimates trended in the same direction for males, but were not significant. BMI in 20s demonstrated a linear relationship with MS (p-trend = 9.60 × 10−4), and a twofold risk of MS for females with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 was observed (OR = 2.15, 95% CI 1.18, 3.92). Significant associations between BMI in 20s and MS in males were not observed. Multivariate modelling demonstrated that significant associations between BMI or body size with MS in females persisted after adjusting for history of infectious mononucleosis and genetic risk factors, including HLA-DRB1*15:01 and established non-HLA risk alleles. Interpretation Results show that childhood and adolescence obesity confer increased risk of MS in females beyond established heritable and environmental risk factors. Strong evidence for a dose-effect of BMI in 20s and MS was observed. The magnitude of BMI association with MS is as large as other known MS risk factors.
    Obesity Research & Clinical Practice 09/2014; · 0.51 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using an aquaporin-4 (AQP4) M1-isoform-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a fixed transfected cell-based assay (CBA), we tested AQP4-IgG in a northern California population representative cohort of 3293 potential cases with multiple sclerosis (MS). Seropositive cases were tested additionally by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, a live transfected cell-based assay.
    JAMA Neurology 09/2014; · 7.58 Impact Factor
  • F B S Briggs, L J Leung, L F Barcellos
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a strong and complex genetic component to multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition to variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6p21.3, 110 non-MHC susceptibility variants have been identified in Northern Europeans, thus far. The majority of the MS-associated genes are immune related; however, similar to most other complex genetic diseases, the causal variants and biological processes underlying pathogenesis remain largely unknown. We created a comprehensive catalog of putative functional variants that reside within linkage disequilibrium regions of the MS-associated genic variants to guide future studies. Bioinformatics analyses were also conducted using publicly available resources to identify plausible pathological processes relevant to MS and functional hypotheses for established MS-associated variants.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 17 July 2014; doi:10.1038/gene.2014.37.
    Genes and immunity. 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Hispanic children have a higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than non-Hispanic whites, but tend to be diagnosed at older ages. In genome-wide association studies, Native American ancestry and polymorphisms in six genes have been associated with ALL risk.Methods: In multivariable regression models, we investigated whether genomic ancestry, inherited risk SNPs, or acquired somatic alterations were associated with differences in age at diagnosis in Hispanic children with B-cell ALL. Genome-wide array data were used to estimate each participant's percent membership in the three Hispanic ancestral populations: Native American, African, and European.Results: Each 20% increase in European ancestry was associated with a six month younger age at diagnosis (95% CI=0.36-11.6 months, P=0.037). Correspondingly, each 20% increase in Native American ancestry was associated with a six month older age at diagnosis (P=0.037). Both the TEL-AML1 translocation and high-hyperdiploidy were associated with younger age at diagnosis (24.4 months, P=2.0x10-4 and 12.4 months, P=0.011, respectively), while CDKN2A and IKZF1 deletions were associated with older age at diagnosis (19.7 months, P=7.0x10-4 and 18.1 months, P=0.012, respectively). No associations with age at diagnosis were observed for RAS mutation, PAX5 deletion or for known heritable risk alleles in IKZF1, CDKN2A, PIP4K2A, GATA3, ARID5B or CEBPE.Conclusion: Because younger age at diagnosis is associated with improved treatment outcomes for children with ALL, the effect of European ancestry on ALL survival may be mediated by its effect on age at diagnosis, or by proxy, its association with more treatable molecular subtypes of ALL.
    American Journal of Hematology 04/2014; · 4.00 Impact Factor
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tobacco smoke is an established risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that variation in genes involved in metabolism of tobacco smoke constituents may modify MS risk in smokers. A three-stage gene-environment investigation was conducted for NAT1, NAT2, and GSTP1 variants. The discovery analysis was conducted among 1588 white MS cases and controls from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region HealthPlan (Kaiser). The replication analysis was carried out in 988 white MS cases and controls from Sweden. Tobacco smoke exposure at the age of 20 years was associated with greater MS risk in both data sets (in Kaiser, odds ratio [OR] = 1.51 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-1.93]; in Sweden, OR = 1.35 [1.04-1.74]). A total of 42 NAT1 variants showed evidence for interaction with tobacco smoke exposure (Pcorrected < 0.05). Genotypes for 41 NAT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied in the replication data set. A variant (rs7388368C>A) within a dense transcription factor-binding region showed evidence for interaction (Kaiser, OR for interaction = 1.75 [95% CI = 1.19-2.56]; Sweden, OR = 1.62 [1.05-2.49]). Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with MS risk among rs7388368A carriers only; homozygote individuals had the highest risk (A/A, OR = 5.17 [95% CI = 2.17-12.33]). We conducted a three-stage analysis using two population-based case-control datasets that consisted of a discovery population, a replication population, and a pooled analysis. NAT1 emerged as a genetic effect modifier of tobacco smoke exposure in MS susceptibility.
    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 03/2014; · 5.51 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 6 March 2014; doi:10.1038/gene.2014.6.
    Genes and immunity 03/2014; · 4.22 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies. INTRODUCTION Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is a complex autoimmune disease that can affect multiple organ systems. Processes involving both the innate and adaptive immune systems contribute to its development.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Adverse socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood and adulthood is associated with a proinflammatory phenotype, and therefore an important exposure to consider for multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease. The objective was to determine whether SEP over the life course confers increased susceptibility to MS. 1643 white, non-Hispanic MS case and control members recruited from the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Plan, Northern California Region, for which comprehensive genetic, clinical and environmental exposure data have been collected were studied. Logistic regression models investigated measures of childhood and adulthood SEP, and accounted for effects due to established MS risk factors, including HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele carrier status, smoking history, history of infectious mononucleosis, family history of MS and body size. Multiple measures of childhood and adulthood SEP were significantly associated with risk of MS, including parents renting versus owning a home at age 10: OR=1.48, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.02, p=0.013; less than a college education versus at least a college education based on parental household: OR=1.28, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.63, p=0.041; low versus high life course SEP: OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.05, p=0.012; and low versus high social mobility: OR=1.74, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.39, p=5.7×10(-4). Results derived from a population-representative case-control study provide support for the role of adverse SEP in MS susceptibility and add to the growing evidence linking lower SEP to poorer health outcomes. Both genetic and environmental contributions to chronic conditions are important and must be characterised to fully understand MS aetiology.
    Journal of epidemiology and community health 02/2014; · 3.04 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated potential interactions between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype and body mass index (BMI) status in relation to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). We used 2 case-control studies, one with incident cases (1,510 cases, 2,017 controls) and one with prevalent cases (937 cases, 609 controls). Subjects with different genotypes and BMI were compared with regard to incidence of MS by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) employing logistic regression. Potential interactions between genotypes and BMI were evaluated by calculating the attributable proportion due to interaction. In both cohorts, a significant interaction was observed between HLA-DRB1*15 and obesity, regardless of HLA-A*02 status. Similarly, there was a significant interaction between absence of A*02 and obesity, regardless of DRB1*15 status. In the incident cohort, obese subjects with the most susceptible genotype (carriage of DRB1*15 and absence of A*02) had an OR of 16.2 (95% CI 7.5-35.2) compared to nonobese subjects without the genetic risk factors. The corresponding OR in the prevalent study was 13.8 (95% CI 4.1-46.8). We observed striking interactions between BMI status and HLA genotype with regard to MS risk. Hypothetically, a low-grade inflammatory response inherent to obesity synergizes with the adaptive, HLA molecule-restricted arm of the immune system, causing MS. Prevention of adolescent obesity may thus lower the risk of developing MS, predominantly among people with a genetic susceptibility to the disease.
    Neurology 02/2014; · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) perform per-SNP association tests to identify variants involved in disease or trait susceptibility. However, such an approach is not powerful enough to unravel genes that are not individually contributing to the disease/trait, but that may have a role in interaction with other genes as a group. Pathway analysis is an alternative way to highlight such group of genes. Using SNP association P-values from eight multiple sclerosis (MS) GWAS data sets, we performed a candidate pathway analysis for MS susceptibility by considering genes interacting in the cell adhesion molecule (CAMs) biological pathway using Cytoscape software. This network is a strong candidate, as it is involved in the crossing of the blood-brain barrier by the T cells, an early event in MS pathophysiology, and is used as an efficient therapeutic target. We drew up a list of 76 genes belonging to the CAM network. We highlighted 64 networks enriched with CAM genes with low P-values. Filtering by a percentage of CAM genes up to 50% and rejecting enriched signals mainly driven by transcription factors, we highlighted five networks associated with MS susceptibility. One of them, constituted of ITGAL, ICAM1 and ICAM3 genes, could be of interest to develop novel therapeutic targets.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 16 January 2014; doi:10.1038/gene.2013.70.
    Genes and immunity 01/2014; · 4.22 Impact Factor
  • Blood 11/2013; 122(19):3385-7. · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region is strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. HLA-DRB1*15:01 has the strongest effect, and several other alleles have been reported at different levels of validation. Using SNP data from genome-wide studies, we imputed and tested classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms in 8 classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes in 5,091 cases and 9,595 controls. We identified 11 statistically independent effects overall: 6 HLA-DRB1 and one DPB1 alleles in class II, one HLA-A and two B alleles in class I, and one signal in a region spanning from MICB to LST1. This genomic segment does not contain any HLA class I or II genes and provides robust evidence for the involvement of a non-HLA risk allele within the MHC. Interestingly, this region contains the TNF gene, the cognate ligand of the well-validated TNFRSF1A MS susceptibility gene. The classical HLA effects can be explained to some extent by polymorphic amino acid positions in the peptide-binding grooves. This study dissects the independent effects in the MHC, a critical region for MS susceptibility that harbors multiple risk alleles.
    PLoS Genetics 11/2013; 9(11):e1003926. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P < 1.0 × 10(-4)). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), 3 of which we found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants at 103 discrete loci outside of the major histocompatibility complex. With high-resolution Bayesian fine mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalog of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals.
    Nature Genetics 09/2013; · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Analysis of epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation, is of increasing interest for epidemiologic studies examining disease etiology and impacts of environmental exposures. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip® (450K), which interrogates over 480,000 CpG sites and is relatively cost effective, has become a popular tool to characterize the DNA methylome. For large-scale studies, minimizing technical variability and potential bias is paramount. The goal of this paper was to evaluate the performance of several existing and novel color channel normalizations designed to reduce technical variability and batch effects in 450K analysis from a large population study. Comparative assessment of 10 normalization procedures included the GenomeStudio® Illumina procedure, the lumi smooth quantile approach, and the newly proposed All Sample Mean Normalization (ASMN). We also examined the performance of normalizations in combination with correction for the two types of Infinium chemistry utilized on the 450K array. We observed that the performance of the GenomeStudio® normalization procedure was highly variable and dependent on the quality of the first sample analyzed in an experiment, which is used as a reference in this procedure. While the lumi normalization was able to decrease batch variability, it increased variation among technical replicates, potentially reducing biologically meaningful findings. The proposed ASMN procedure performed consistently well, both at reducing batch effects and improving replicate comparability. In summary, the ASMN procedure can improve existing color channel normalization, especially for large epidemiologic studies, and can be successfully implemented to enhance a 450K DNA methylation data pipeline.
    Epigenetics: official journal of the DNA Methylation Society 08/2013; 8(11). · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives. We examined the relationship between genetic ancestry, socioeconomic status (SES), and lung cancer among African Americans and Latinos. Methods. We evaluated SES and genetic ancestry in a Northern California lung cancer case-control study (1998-2003) of African Americans and Latinos. Lung cancer case and control participants were frequency matched on age, gender, and race/ethnicity. We assessed case-control differences in individual admixture proportions using the 2-sample t test and analysis of covariance. Logistic regression models examined associations among genetic ancestry, socioeconomic characteristics, and lung cancer. Results. Decreased Amerindian ancestry was associated with higher education among Latino control participants and greater African ancestry was associated with decreased education among African lung cancer case participants. Education was associated with lung cancer among both Latinos and African Americans, independent of smoking, ancestry, age, and gender. Genetic ancestry was not associated with lung cancer among African Americans. Conclusions. Findings suggest that socioeconomic factors may have a greater impact than genetic ancestry on lung cancer among African Americans. The genetic heterogeneity and recent dynamic migration and acculturation of Latinos complicate recruitment; thus, epidemiological analyses and findings should be interpreted cautiously. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print August 15, 2013: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301370).
    American Journal of Public Health 08/2013; · 3.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent genome-wide studies conducted in European Whites have identified novel susceptibility genes for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We sought to examine whether these loci are susceptibility genes among Hispanics, whose reported incidence of childhood ALL is the highest of all ethnic groups in California, and whether their effects differ between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). We genotyped 13 variants in these genes among 706 Hispanic (300 cases, 406 controls) and 594 NHW (225 cases, 369 controls) participants in a matched population-based case-control study in California. We found significant associations for the five studied ARID5B variants in both Hispanics (p values of 1.0 × 10(-9) to 0.004) and NHWs (p values of 2.2 × 10(-6) to 0.018). Risk estimates were in the same direction in both groups (ORs of 1.53-1.99 and 1.37-1.84, respectively) and strengthened when restricted to B-cell precursor high-hyperdiploid ALL (>50 chromosomes; ORs of 2.21-3.22 and 1.67-2.71, respectively). Similar results were observed for the single CEBPE variant. Hispanics and NHWs exhibited different susceptibility loci at CDKN2A. Although IKZF1 loci showed significant susceptibility effects among NHWs (p < 1 × 10(-5)), their effects among Hispanics were in the same direction but nonsignificant, despite similar minor allele frequencies. Future studies should examine whether the observed effects vary by environmental, immunological, or lifestyle factors.
    Cancer Causes and Control 07/2013; · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • Blood 06/2013; 121(23):4808-9. · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 04/2013; · 10.16 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
988.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2014
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • • Division of Epidemiology
      • • School of Public Health
      • • Department of Integrative Biology
      Berkeley, California, United States
    • The University of Calgary
      Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • 1999–2013
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
      • • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Division of Hospital Medicine
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2011
    • Blood Systems Research Institute
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2002–2011
    • Vanderbilt University
      • Center for Human Genetics Research (CHGR)
      Nashville, MI, United States
    • University Hospital Vall d'Hebron
      • Department of Neurology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2010
    • King's College London
      • Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2001–2008
    • CSU Mentor
      • Department of Medicine
      Long Beach, California, United States
    • Tulane University
      New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
    • Roche
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Basel, BS, Switzerland
  • 2007
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2002–2007
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Center for Human Genetics
      Durham, NC, United States
  • 2004–2006
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Clinical Neurosciences
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom