Aïda Boughammoura

French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (5)17.9 Total impact

  • Aïda Boughammoura, Dominique Expert, Thierry Franza
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    ABSTRACT: During infection, the phytopathogenic enterobacterium Dickeya dadantii has to cope with iron-limiting conditions and the production of reactive oxygen species by plant cells. A tight control of the bacterial intracellular iron content is necessary for full virulence of D. dadantii: previous studies have shown that the ferritin FtnA and the bacterioferrtin Bfr, devoted to iron storage, contribute differentially to the virulence of this species. In this work, we investigated the role of the Dps miniferritin in iron homeostasis in D. dadantii. We constructed a Dps-deficient mutant by reverse genetics. This mutant grew like the wild-type stain under iron starvation and showed no decreased iron content. However, the dps mutant displayed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in comparison to the wild-type strain. This hydrogen peroxide susceptibility only occurs when bacteria are in the stationary phase. Unlike the bfr and the ftnA mutants, the dps mutant is not affected in its pathogenicity on host plants. The dps gene expression is induced at the stationary phase of growth. The Sigma S transcriptional factor is necessary for this control. Furthermore, dps expression is positively regulated by the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR during the exponential growth phase, after hydrogen peroxide treatment. These results indicate that the Dps miniferritin from D. dadantii has a minor role in iron homeostasis, but is important in conferring tolerance to hydrogen peroxide and for survival of cells that enter the stationary phase of growth.
    Biology of Metals 12/2011; 25(2):423-33. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Dominique Expert, Aïda Boughammoura, Thierry Franza
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    ABSTRACT: The intracellular fate of iron acquired by bacteria during siderophore-mediated assimilation is poorly understood. We investigated this question in the pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi. This bacterium produces two siderophores, chrysobactin and achromobactin, during plant infection. We analyzed the distribution of iron into cytosolic proteins in bacterial cells supplied with 59Fe-chrysobactin using native gel electrophoresis. A parental strain and mutants deficient in bacterioferritin (bfr), miniferritin (dps), ferritin (ftnA), bacterioferredoxin (bfd), or iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery (sufABCDSE) were studied. In the parental strain, we observed two rapidly 59Fe-labeled protein signals identified as bacterioferritin and an iron pool associated to the protein chain-elongation process. In the presence of increased 59Fe-chrysobactin concentrations, we detected mini-ferritin-bound iron. Iron incorporation into bacterioferritin was severely reduced in nonpolar sufA, sufB, sufD, sufS, and sufE mutants but not in a sufC background. Iron recycling from bacterioferritin did not occur in bfd and sufC mutants. Iron depletion caused a loss of aconitase activity, whereas ferric chrysobactin supplementation stimulated the production of active aconitase in parental cells and in bfr and bfd mutants. Aconitase activity in sufA, sufB, sufD, sufS, and sufE mutant strains was 10 times lower than that in parental cells. In the sufC mutant, it was twice as low as that in the parental strain. Defects observed in the mutants were not caused by altered ferric chrysobactin transport. Our data demonstrate a functional link between bacterioferritin, bacterioferredoxin, and the Suf protein machinery resulting in optimal bacterial growth and a balanced distribution of iron between essential metalloproteins.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2008; 283(52):36564-72. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: During infection, the phytopathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi has to cope with iron-limiting conditions and the production of reactive oxygen species by plant cells. Previous studies have shown that a tight control of the bacterial intracellular iron content is necessary for full virulence. The E. chrysanthemi genome possesses two loci that could be devoted to iron storage: the bfr gene, encoding a heme-containing bacterioferritin, and the ftnA gene, coding for a paradigmatic ferritin. To assess the role of these proteins in the physiology of this pathogen, we constructed ferritin-deficient mutants by reverse genetics. Unlike the bfr mutant, the ftnA mutant had increased sensitivity to iron deficiency and to redox stress conditions. Interestingly, the bfr ftnA mutant displayed an intermediate phenotype for sensitivity to these stresses. Whole-cell analysis by Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the main iron storage protein is FtnA and that there is an increase in the ferrous iron/ferric iron ratio in the ftnA and bfr ftnA mutants. We found that ftnA gene expression is positively controlled by iron and the transcriptional repressor Fur via the small antisense RNA RyhB. bfr gene expression is induced at the stationary phase of growth. The sigmaS transcriptional factor is necessary for this control. Pathogenicity tests showed that FtnA and the Bfr contribute differentially to the virulence of E. chrysanthemi depending on the host, indicating the importance of a perfect control of iron homeostasis in this bacterial species during infection.
    Journal of bacteriology 04/2008; 190(5):1518-30. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The gene xynD (renamed pgdA) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 was shown to encode a peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase. Inactivation of pgdA in L. lactis led to fully acetylated peptidoglycan, whereas cloning of pgdA on a multicopy plasmid vector resulted in an increased degree of peptidoglycan deacetylation, as shown by analysis of peptidoglycan constituent muropeptides. An increased amount of N-unsubstituted glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan resulted in a reduction of the rate of autolysis of L. lactis cells. The activity of the L. lactis major autolysin AcmA was tested on L. lactis cells or peptidoglycan with different degrees of de-N-acetylation. Deacetylated peptidoglycan exhibited decreased susceptibility to AcmA hydrolysis. This reduced susceptibility to AcmA did not result from reduced AcmA binding to peptidoglycan with an increasing degree of de-N-acetylation. In conclusion, enzymic N-acetylglucosamine deacetylation protects peptidoglycan from hydrolysis by the major autolysin AcmA in L. lactis cells, and this leads to decreased cellular autolysis.
    Microbiology 11/2007; 153(Pt 10):3275-85. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The enterobacterial pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi causes soft rot diseases on a wide range of plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This bacterium proliferates in the host by secreting a set of pectin degrading enzymes responsible for symptom development. In addition, survival of this bacterium in planta requires two high-affinity iron acquisition systems mediated by siderophores and protective systems against oxidative damages, suggesting the implication by both partners of accurate mechanisms controlling their iron homeostasis under conditions of infection. In this review, we address this question and we show that ferritins both from the pathogen and the host are subtly implicated in the control of this interplay.
    BioMetals 07/2007; 20(3-4):347-53. · 3.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

83 Citations
17.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2011
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      • Laboratoire des Interactions Plantes-Pathogènes UMR 217 (LIPP)
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France