Katsuji Yoshioka

Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan

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Publications (64)223.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) GTPase is important in cytokinesis and localizes to the midbody. However, the mechanism and regulation of ARF6's recruitment to the midbody are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the functions of two binding partners of active ARF6, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1) and JNK-associated leucine zipper protein (JLP), by gene knockout and rescue experiments in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Depleting both JSAP1 and JLP impaired ARF6's localization to the midbody and delayed cytokinesis. These defects were almost completely rescued by wild-type JSAP1 or JLP, but not by JSAP1 or JLP mutants that were unable to interact with active ARF6 or with the kinesin heavy chain (KHC) of kinesin-1. In transfected cells, a constitutively active form of ARF6 associated with KHC only when co-expressed with wild-type JSAP1 or JLP and not with a JSAP1 or JLP mutant. These findings suggest that JSAP1 and JLP, which might be paralogous to each other, are critical and functionally redundant in cytokinesis and control ARF6 localization to the midbody by forming a tripartite complex of JSAP1/JLP, active ARF6, and kinesin-1.
    Genes to Cells 08/2014; · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ultraviolet B (UVB) component of sunlight can cause severe damage to skin cells and even induce skin cancer. Growing evidence indicates that the UVB-induced signaling network is complex and involves diverse cellular processes. In this study, we investigated the role of c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase-associated leucine zipper protein (JLP), a scaffold protein for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades, in UVB-induced apoptosis. We found that UVB-induced skin epidermal apoptosis was prevented in Jlp knockout (KO) as well as in keratinocyte-specific Jlp KO mice. Analysis of the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage over time showed no evidence for the involvement of JLP in this process. In contrast, UVB-stimulated p38 MAPK activation in the skin was impaired in both Jlp KO and keratinocyte-specific Jlp KO mice. Moreover, topical treatment of UVB-irradiated mouse skin with a p38 inhibitor significantly suppressed the epidermal apoptosis in wild-type mice, but not in Jlp KO mice. Our findings suggest that JLP in skin basal keratinocytes plays an important role in UVB-induced apoptosis by modulating p38 MAPK signaling pathways. This is the first study to show a critical role for JLP in an in vivo response to environmental stimulation.
    Genes to Cells 02/2014; · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Compared with the knowledge of maternal care, much less is known about the factors required for paternal parental care. Here we report that new sires of laboratory mice, though not spontaneously parental, can be induced to show maternal-like parental care (pup retrieval) using signals from dams separated from their pups. During this interaction, the maternal mates emit 38-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations to their male partners, which are equivalent to vocalizations that occur following pheromone stimulation. Without these signals or in the absence of maternal mates, the sires do not retrieve their pups within 5 min. These results show that, in mice, the maternal parent communicates to the paternal parent to encourage pup care. This new paradigm may be useful in the analysis of the parental brain during paternal care induced by interactive communication.
    Nature Communications 01/2013; 4:1346. · 10.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by natural killer and T cells, which have crucial functions in tumor and microbial immunosurveillance. Several cytokines have been identified as modulators of NKG2D receptor expression. However, little is known about NKG2D gene regulation. In this study, we found that microRNA 1245 attenuated the expression of NKG2D in natural killer cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated the potential interactions between the 3'-untranslated region of the NKG2D gene and microRNA as well as their functional roles in the regulation of NKG2D expression and cytotoxicity in natural killer cells. RESULTS: Transforming growth factor-β1, a major negative regulator of NKG2D expression, post-transcriptionally up-regulated mature microRNA-1245 expression, thus down-regulating NKG2D expression and impairing NKG2D-mediated immune responses in natural killer cells. Conversely, microRNA-1245 down-regulation significantly increased the expression of NKG2D expression in natural killer cells, resulting in more efficient NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity. Conclusions These results reveal a novel NKG2D regulatory pathway mediated by microRNA-1245, which may represent one of the mechanisms used by transforming growth factor-β1 to attenuate NKG2D expression in natural killer cells.
    Haematologica 04/2012; 97(9):1295-303. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    Tokiharu Sato, Anir Enkhbat, Katsuji Yoshioka
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that the scaffold protein c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1) functions in cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs) to promote their cell-cycle exit and differentiation. In this study, we used immunocytochemistry to examine the subcellular distribution of JSAP1 in proliferating cultured GCPs. We found that when stimulated with fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a factor that promotes GCP differentiation through JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, JSAP1 translocated to the plasma membrane and colocalized with activated JNK and ERK. In transfected cells expressing a constitutively activated FGF receptor (FGFR), JSAP1 and the activated FGFR colocalized at the plasma membrane with not only activated but also unphosphorylated and inactive JNK and ERK. These colocalizations did not occur when a mutant JSAP1 lacking the JNK-binding domain was substituted for wild-type JSAP1. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells showed that activated FGFR increased JSAP1's affinity for JNK and ERK and that JSAP1 enhanced FGFR-induced JNK and ERK activation. Collectively, these results suggest that when stimulated by FGFR, JSAP1 translocates to the plasma membrane, where it recruits JNK and ERK and facilitates their activation, leading to the differentiation of cerebellar GCPs.
    Genes to Cells 01/2011; 16(1):58-68. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), are composed of a MAPK, MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK). Previously, we reported that JNK-binding protein 1 (JNKBP1) enhances JNK activation induced by the TGF-beta-activated kinase1 (TAK1) MAPKKK in transfected cells. We have investigated whether JNKBP1 functions as an adaptor protein for nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation mediated by TAK1 in COS-7 cells. Co-expression experiments showed that JNKBP1 interacted with not only TAK1, but also with its upstream regulators, TNF-receptor associated factors 2 and 6 (TRAF2 and TRAF6). An endogenous interaction between JNKBP1 and TRAF2 or TAK1 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation analysis. We also found that JNKBP1 could enhance the NF-kappaB activation induced by TAK1 and TRAF2, and could promote TRAF2 polyubiquitination. These results suggest a scaffolding role for JNKBP1 in the TRAF2-TAK1-NF-kappaB signaling pathway.
    Cell Biology International 04/2009; 33(3):364-8. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), are composed of a MAPK, MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK). Previously, we reported that JNK-binding protein 1 (JNKBP1) enhances JNK activation induced by the TGF-β-activated kinase1 (TAK1) MAPKKK in transfected cells. We have investigated whether JNKBP1 functions as an adaptor protein for nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation mediated by TAK1 in COS-7 cells. Co-expression experiments showed that JNKBP1 interacted with not only TAK1, but also with its upstream regulators, TNF-receptor associated factors 2 and 6 (TRAF2 and TRAF6). An endogenous interaction between JNKBP1 and TRAF2 or TAK1 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation analysis. We also found that JNKBP1 could enhance the NF-κB activation induced by TAK1 and TRAF2, and could promote TRAF2 polyubiquitination. These results suggest a scaffolding role for JNKBP1 in the TRAF2–TAK1–NF-κB signaling pathway.
    Cell Biology International 01/2009; 33(3):364-368. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs) proliferate in the outer part of the external granular layer (EGL). They begin their differentiation by exiting the cell cycle and migrating into the inner part of the EGL. Here we report that JSAP1, a scaffold protein for JNK signaling pathways, is expressed predominantly in the post-mitotic GCPs of the inner EGL. JSAP1 knockdown or treatment with a JNK inhibitor enhances the proliferation of cultured GCPs, but the overexpression of wild-type JSAP1 leads to increased proportions of p27(Kip1)- and NeuN-positive cells, even with saturating concentrations of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a potent GCP mitogen. However, these differentiation-promoting effects on GCPs are attenuated significantly in cells overexpressing a mutant JSAP1 that lacks the JNK-binding domain. Together, these data suggest that JSAP1 antagonizes the mitogenic effect of Shh on GCPs and promotes their exit from the cell cycle and differentiation, by modulating JNK activity.
    Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 09/2008; 39(4):569-78. · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The specific and efficient activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling modules is mediated, at least in part, by scaffold proteins. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)-associated leucine zipper protein (JLP) was identified as a scaffold protein for JNK and p38 MAPK signaling modules. JLP is expressed nearly ubiquitously and is involved in intracellular signaling pathways, such as the G(alpha13) and Cdo-mediated pathway, in vitro. To date, however, JLP expression has not been analyzed in detail, nor are its physiological functions well understood. Here we investigated the expression of JLP in the mouse testis during development. Of the tissues examined, JLP was strongest in the testis, with the most intense staining in the elongated spermatids. Since the anti-JLP antibody used in this study can recognize both JLP and sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9), a splice variant of JLP that has been studied extensively in primates, we also examined its expression in macaque testis samples. Our results indicated that in mouse and primate testis, the isoform expressed at the highest level was JLP, not SPAG9. We also investigated the function of JLP by disrupting the Jlp gene in mice, and found that the male homozygotes were subfertile. Taken together, these observations may suggest that JLP plays an important role in testis during development, especially in the production of functionally normal spermatozoa.
    Transgenic Research 07/2008; 17(6):1045-58. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Scaffold proteins for MAP kinase (MAPK) signalling modules play an important role in the specific and efficient signal transduction of the relevant MAPK cascades. Here, we investigated the function of the scaffolding protein c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-associated leucine zipper protein (JLP) by depleting it in cultured cells using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against human JLP. HeLa and DLD-1 cells stably expressing the shRNA showed a defect in cell migration. The re-expression of full- length shRNA-resistant mouse JLP rescued the impaired cell migration of the JLP- depleted HeLa cells; whereas, a C-terminal deletion mutant of mouse JLP, which failed to bind the G protein Ga13, showed little or no effect on the cell migration defect. Furthermore, although a constitutively active Ga13 enhanced the migration of control HeLa cells, the Ga13-induced cell migration was significantly suppressed in the JLP-depleted HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that JLP regulates cell migration through an interaction with Ga13.
    Journal of Biochemistry 01/2008; 144(6):693-700. · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously identified c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1, also known as JNK-interacting protein 3) as a scaffolding factor for JNK intracellular signaling pathways. Targeted gene-disruption studies have shown that JSAP1-null mice are unable to breathe and die shortly after birth. Although neural defects might be responsible for their death, there has been no convincing evidence for this. Here we first generated genetically engineered mice carrying a loxP-flanked (floxed) jsap1 gene. To evaluate the validity of this deletion as a jsap1 conditional knockout (KO), we created mice in which the same exon was deleted in all cell lineages, and compared their phenotypes with those of the jsap1 conventional KO mice reported previously. The two KO lines showed indistinguishable phenotypes, i.e., neonatal death and morphological defects in the telencephalon, indicating that the conditional deletion was a true null mutation. We then introduced the floxed jsap1 deletion mutant specifically into the neural lineage, and found that the jsap1 conditional KO mice showed essentially the same phenotypes as the JSAP1-null mice. These results strongly suggest that the neonatal death of jsap1-deficient mice is caused by defects in the nervous system.
    Neuroscience Letters 01/2008; 429(1):43-8. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) non-structural proteins are major components of replication complex that is modulated by several host factors. We previously reported that nucleolin, a representative nucleolar marker, interacts with the NS5B through two separated sequences, amino acids (aa) 208-214 and 500-506, and that W208 in the former stretch is essential for both nucleolin-binding and HCV replication. Here we evaluated the role of the latter stretch aa 500-506 of WRHRARS in nucleolin-binding and HCV replication scanned by alanine-substituted clustered mutant (cm) or point mutant (pm). One tryptophan and three arginine residues in the sequence were found to be essential both for nucleolin-binding in vivo and HCV replication detected with a HCV subgenomic replicon transfected into Huh7 cells. NS5B-binding of nucleolin was further delineated by truncation and clustered mutants of nucleolin. Arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) repeat in the Glycine arginine rich (GAR) domain were defined to be indispensable for NS5B-binding immunologically detected in in vivo and in vitro although short internal-truncations of RGG repeat are tolerable for NS5B-binding. These results indicate that nucleolin is a critical host factor for HCV replication through the direct interaction between W208 and several residues at the sequence, aa 500-505, of NS5B, and the long-turn motif including RGG repeat at nucleolin C-terminal.
    Journal of Biochemistry 07/2007; 141(6):917-27. · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that the level of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1), a scaffold protein for JNK signaling, increases dramatically during nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of PC12h cells. In the present study, we investigated the function of JSAP1 during PC12h cell differentiation by knocking down the level of JSAP1. The depletion of JSAP1 caused NGF-treated PC12h cells to form aggregates and impaired their differentiation. The aggregation was not observed in JSAP1-depleted cells that were untreated or treated with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemical studies indicated that N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin, was localized to sites of cell-cell contact in the aggregated cells. Furthermore, an inhibitory anti-N-cadherin antibody completely blocked the aggregation. Taken together, these results suggest that JSAP1 regulates cell-cell interactions in PC12h cells specifically in the NGF-induced signaling pathway, and does so by modulating N-cadherin.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 03/2007; 353(2):357-62. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The wild type Copia Gag precursor protein of Drosophila melanogaster expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to be processed autocatalytically to generate two daughter proteins with molecular masses of 33 and 23 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The active-site motif of aspartic proteinases, Asp-Ser-Gly, was present in the 23 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal half of the precursor protein. The coding region of this daughter protein (152 residues) in the copia gag gene was expressed in E. coli to produce the recombinant enzyme protein as inclusion bodies, which was then purified and refolded to create the active enzyme. Using the peptide substrate His-Gly-Ile-Ala-Phe-Met-Val-Lys-Glu-Val-Asn (cleavage site: Phe-Met) designed on the basis of the sequence of the cleavage-site region of the precursor protein, the enzymatic properties of the proteinase were investigated. The optimum pH and temperature of the proteinase toward the synthetic peptide were 4.0 and 70 degrees C respectively. The proteolytic activity was increased with increasing NaCl concentration in the reaction mixture, the optimum concentration being 2 M. Pepstatin A strongly inhibited the enzyme, with a Ki value of 15 nM at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the active-site residue mutant, in which the putative catalytic aspartic acid residue was mutated to an alanine residue, had no activity. These results show that the Copia proteinase belongs to the family of aspartic proteinases including HIV proteinase. The B-chain of oxidized bovine insulin was hydrolysed at the Leu15-Tyr16 bond fairly selectively. Thus the recombinant Copia proteinase partially resembles HIV proteinase, but is significantly different from it in certain aspects.
    Biochemical Journal 12/2006; 399(3):535-42. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is one of the three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) playing key roles in various cellular processes in response to both extracellular and intracellular stimuli. JNK/SAPK-associated protein 1 (JSAP1 also referred to as JIP3) is a JNK-associated scaffold that controls the specificity and efficiency of JNK signaling cascades. Here we studied its expression in mouse brains. JSAP1 mRNA was expressed in developing and adult brains, showing spatial patterns similar to JNK1-3 mRNAs. In embryos, JSAP1 immunolabeling was intense for progenitor cells in the ventricular zone throughout the brain and in the external granular layer of the cerebellum, and for neurons and glial cells differentiating in the mantle zone. In adults, JSAP1 was distributed in various neurons and Bergmann glia, with higher levels in striatal cholinergic interneurons, telencephalic parvalbumin-positive interneurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells. In these neurons, JSAP1 was observed as tiny particulate staining in spines, dendrites, perikarya and axons, where it was often associated with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and cell membrane. Immunoblots revealed enriched distribution in the microsomal fraction and cytosolic fraction. Therefore, the characteristic cellular expression and subcellular distribution of JSAP1 might be beneficial for cells to efficiently link external stimuli to the JNK MAPK pathway and other intracellular machineries.
    Journal of Neurochemistry 07/2006; 97(5):1431-46. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease (AD) probably involve a type of phosphorylation imbalance causing the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons and/or glias. Investigation of R406W tau mutation may provide insight into such abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation, since this mutation causes AD-like dementia and tauopathy in humans and because it has the unique ability to reduce tau phosphorylation in vitro and in cultured cells. Here we show that R406W mutation primarily disrupts tau phosphorylation at Ser404, a priming phosphorylation site of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), thereby reducing subsequent GSK-3beta-mediated phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site (mostly Ser396). In contrast, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as activated in the mitotic phase directly hyperphosphorylates R406W tau at the PHF-1 site. This was confirmed by PHF-1 hyperphosphorylation of R406W tau in mitotic cells, its association with cytoplasmic JNK activation, and its inhibition by a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. These data unveil the unknown mechanisms of physiological tau phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site and suggest that cytoplasmic JNK activation may play an important role in the abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation associated with R406W tau mutation and in AD.
    The FASEB Journal 05/2006; 20(6):762-4. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Scaffold proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) intracellular signal transduction pathways mediate the efficient and specific activation of the relevant MAPK signaling modules. Previously, our group and others have identified c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1, also known as JNK-interacting protein 3) as a scaffold protein for JNK MAPK pathways. Although JSAP1 is expressed in the testis in adults, its expression during development has not been investigated. In addition, it is unknown which types of cells in the testis express the scaffold protein. Here, we examined the expression of JSAP1 in the testis of mice aged 14 days, 20 days, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The specificity of the anti-JSAP1 antibody was evaluated from its reactivity to exogenously expressed JSAP1 and a structurally related protein, and by antigen-absorption experiments. The immunohistochemical analyses with the specific antibody showed that the JSAP1 protein was selectively expressed in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes, but not in other cell types, including spermatids and somatic cells, during development. However, not all spermatogonia and spermatocytes were immunopositive either, especially in the 12-week-old mouse testis. Furthermore, we found by Western blotting that the expression levels of JSAP1 protein vary during development; there is high expression until 6 weeks after birth, which approximately corresponds to the end of the first wave of spermatogenesis. Collectively, these results suggest that JSAP1 function may be important in spermatogenic cells during early postnatal development.
    Reproduction (Cambridge, England) 05/2006; 131(4):711-9. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although most somatic cells cannot proliferate, immature cells proliferate continuously to produce mature cells. Recently, we cloned mouse PSF1 from a hematopoietic stem cell specific cDNA library and reported that PSF1 is indispensable for the proliferation of immature cells. To identify the PSF1-binding protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system with PSF1 as bait, and identified and cloned SLD5. SLD5 interacted with a central region of PSF1. Tissue distribution of SLD5 was quite similar to that of PSF1. When overexpressed, SLD5 protein was co-localized with PSF1. These data suggest that PSF1 and SLD5 may cooperate in the proliferation of immature cell populations.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 02/2006; 339(4):1204-7. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1), a scaffold protein for JNK signaling, is important in embryonic stem (ES) cells during neurogenesis. In that study, we also observed the altered expression of mesodermal marker genes, which indicated that JSAP1 is involved in the differentiation of mesodermal lineages. Here, we investigated the function of JSAP1 in cardiomyocyte development using JSAP1-null ES cells, and found that cardiomyogenesis was impaired in the JSAP1-null mutant. The JSAP1 deficiency resulted in lower gene expression of the cardiac transcription factor Nkx2.5 and contractile proteins. In contrast, the mutant showed a significantly higher expression of mesoderm-related markers other than those of the cardiomyocyte lineage. Together, these results suggest that JSAP1 may be important for the differentiation of the mesodermal lineages, functioning as a positive factor for cardiomyocyte differentiation, and as an inhibitory factor for differentiation into other lineages.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 01/2006; 338(2):1152-7. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1) (also termed JNK-interacting protein 3; JIP3) is a member of a family of scaffold factors for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, and it also forms a complex with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here we demonstrate that JSAP1 serves as a cooperative scaffold for activation of JNK and regulation of cell migration in response to fibronectin (FN) stimulation. JSAP1 mediated an association between FAK and JNK, which was induced by either co-expression of Src or attachment of cells to FN. Complex formation of FAK with JSAP1 and p130 Crk-associated substrate (p130(Cas)) resulted in augmentation of FAK activity and phosphorylation of both JSAP1 and p130(Cas), which required p130(Cas) hyperphosphorylation and was abolished by inhibition of Src. JNK activation by FN was enhanced by JSAP1, which was suppressed by disrupting the FAK/p130(Cas) pathway by expression of a dominant-negative form of p130(Cas) or by inhibiting Src. We also documented the co-localization of JSAP1 with JNK and phosphorylated FAK at the leading edge and stimulation of cell migration by JSAP1 expression, which depended on its JNK binding domain and was suppressed by inhibition of JNK. The level of JSAP1 mRNA correlated with advanced malignancy in brain tumors, unlike other JIPs. We propose that the JSAP1.FAK complex functions cooperatively as a scaffold for the JNK signaling pathway and regulator of cell migration on FN, and we suggest that JSAP1 is also associated with malignancy in brain tumors.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2005; 280(45):37772-81. · 4.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
223.69 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2011
    • Kanazawa University
      • • Division of Molecular Cell Signaling
      • • Cancer Research Institute
      • • Division of Molecular Virology and Oncology
      • • Division of Molecular Pathology
      Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
  • 1990–2004
    • Kitasato University
      • • Department of Biosciences
      • • Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1992–1993
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Institute of Medical Science
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 1986–1989
    • Kyushu University
      • Research Center for Genetic Information
      Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan