Valerie J Poirier

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, MS, United States

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Publications (9)14.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common feline oral tumor. Standard radiation protocols have been reported to achieve tumor control durations of 1.5-5.5 months (45-165 days). The purpose of this study was to describe the efficacy and toxicity of an accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in cats with oral SCC. Twenty-one cats with histologically confirmed oral SCC and T1-3N0M0 were treated with 10 once-daily fractions (Monday-Friday) of 4.8 Gy. Seventeen cats had macroscopic disease and four were microscopic after incomplete excision. Acute toxicity consisted of grade 2 mucositis in all cats and this was effectively managed using esophageal or gastric tube feeding, pain medication, and antibiotics. Late toxicity effects for cats with available follow-up data included alopecia (4 cats), leukotricia (6), tongue ulceration (1), and oronasal fistula (1). Response could be assessed in 17 cats (seven complete response and five partial response). Four cats (19%) developed metastatic disease without evidence of local progression. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 105 days (1 year PFS of 23%), median local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 219 days (1 year LPFS of 41%), and median overall survival (OS) was 174 days (1 year OS of 29%). Only tumor stage was prognostic, with T1 having a median PFS of 590 days. Findings indicated that this accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol was well tolerated in cats with oral SCC, with manageable adverse events. Tumor response was observed in most cats and long tumor control durations were achieved in some cats.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 10/2012; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this randomized, multicenter study was to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin (LED) and doxorubicin (DOX) in the treatment of feline vaccine-associated sarcoma (VAS). Cats were divided according to their disease status into a microscopic arm (no evidence of gross disease) and a macroscopic arm (evidence of gross disease). Each arm was randomized to receive either LED (1–1.5 mg/kg IV q3 weeks) or DOX (1 mg/kg IV q3 weeks). Thirty-three cats were entered in the macroscopic arm of the study with an overall response rate of 39% (5 complete response and 8 partial response) and a median time to progression of 84 days. Response rates were not different between LED and DOX. Seventy-five cats were entered into the microscopic arm. When compared to a similar historical control population treated with surgery alone, the cats receiving chemotherapy had a prolonged median disease-free interval (388 days versus 93 days). No difference in efficacy was detected between LED and DOX. LED at 1.5 mg/kg induced delayed nephrotoxicosis in 23%, necessitating a decrease in the recommended dosage to 1 mg/kg, and cutaneous toxicosis in 21.7% of treated cats. This study showed that both DOX and LED are efficacious in the treatment of VAS and should be considered in the treatment of this tumor.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 06/2008; 16(6):726 - 731. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) was administered to 25 dogs with histologically confirmed malignant tumors at a dosage of 165 mg/m2 IV over 3–6 hours every 3 weeks. Dogs received premedication with antihistimines and corticosteroids to reduce hypersensitivity reactions. However, 64% of the dogs still experienced allergic reactions. Six dogs (24%) had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, 6 dogs (24%) required hospitalization and 3 dogs (12%) died of sepsis. Five dogs (20%) had a partial response (osteosarcoma [2 dogs] mammary carcinoma [2 dogs] and malignant histiocytosis [1 dog]) for a median duration of 53 days. The overall toxicity was unacceptable at the 165 mg/m2 dose. Therefore, subsequent evaluations of paclitaxel in tumor-bearing dogs should a starting dose of 132 mg/ m2 IV every 3 weeks.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 06/2008; 18(2):219 - 222. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term adverse effects and determine a safe dosage for vinorelbine (Navelbine)--a new semisynthetic vinca alkaloid--in dogs with malignant tumors. Nineteen dogs were treated with vinorelbine as a 5-minute IV infusion every 7 days at starting dosages ranging from 10 to 20 mg/m2. The median number of treatments per dog was 7 (range, 1-11). The maximum tolerated dosage varied between 15 and 18 mg/m2, and a starting dosage of 15 mg/m2 is recommended. Neutropenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Although efficacy was a secondary endpoint of this dosage-finding study, 2 dogs with metastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma experienced a partial response for an overall response rate of 12.5% in 16 dogs with gross measurable disease. Three dogs with microscopic disease were treated (incompletely excised bronchoalveolar carcinoma or lymph node metastatic disease). Two died of pulmonary metastatic disease 113 and 196 days posttreatment, and 1 is still alive after at least 730 days. The well-tolerated toxicity profile and clinical activity observed in dogs with bronchoalveolar carcinoma warrants further investigation.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 01/2004; 18(4):536-9. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Paclitaxel (Taxol) was administered to 25 dogs with histologically confirmed malignant tumors at a dosage of 165 mg/m2 i.v. over 3-6 hours every 3 weeks. Dogs received premedication with antihistimines and corticosteroids to reduce hypersensitivity reactions. However, 64% of the dogs still experienced allergic reactions. Six dogs (24%) had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, 6 dogs (24%) required hospitalization and 3 dogs (12%) died of sepsis. Five dogs (20%) had a partial response (osteosarcoma [2 dogs] mammary carcinoma [2 dogs] and malignant histiocytosis [1 dog]) for a median duration of 53 days. The overall toxicity was unacceptable at the 165 mg/m2 dose. Therefore, subsequent evaluations of paclitaxel in tumor-bearing dogs should a starting dose of 132 mg/m2 i.v. every 3 weeks.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 01/2004; 18(2):219-22. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a class of non-hydrolysable analogues of pyrophosphate that have high affinity for bone mineral and are inhibitors of bone resorption. The in vitro effects of two nitrogen-containing BPs, alendronate (ALE) and zoledronate (ZOL), on growth, induction of apoptosis and effects on cell-cycle distribution in two canine and two human osteosarcoma (OSA) cell lines are investigated here. Both significantly (P < 0.001) reduced cell growth in all cell lines, as assessed by a colorimetric assay with IC(50) values in the range of 7.3-61.4 microM and 7.9-36.3 microM for ALE and ZOL, respectively. Both BPs caused a significant (P < 0.001) dose-dependent increase in the proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis, as assessed both by cell-cycle analysis and by annexin-V binding. Both ALE and ZOL altered the proportion of cells in each phase of the cell cycle, but the extent and proportion was both drug and cell line dependent. These data indicate that the nitrogen-containing BPs have direct anti-tumour activity against canine and human OSA cells.
    Veterinary and Comparative Oncology 12/2003; 1(4):207-15. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this randomized, multicenter study was to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin (LED) and doxorubicin (DOX) in the treatment of feline vaccine-associated sarcoma (VAS). Cats were divided according to their disease status into a microscopic arm (no evidence of gross disease) and a macroscopic arm (evidence of gross disease). Each arm was randomized to receive either LED (1-1.5 mg/kg i.v. q3 weeks) or DOX (1 mg/kg i.v. q3 weeks). Thirty-three cats were entered in the macroscopic arm of the study with an overall response rate of 39% (5 complete response and 8 partial response) and a median time to progression of 84 days. Response rates were not different between LED and DOX. Seventy-five cats were entered into the microscopic arm. When compared to a similar historical control population treated with surgery alone, the cats receiving chemotherapy had a prolonged median disease-free interval (388 days versus 93 days). No difference in efficacy was detected between LED and DOX. LED at 1.5 mg/kg induced delayed nephrotoxicosis in 23%, necessitating a decrease in the recommended dosage to 1 mg/kg, and cutaneous toxicosis in 21.7% of treated cats. This study showed that both DOX and LED are efficacious in the treatment of VAS and should be considered in the treatment of this tumor.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 01/2002; 16(6):726-31. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Forty-five dogs with incompletely excised grade II mast cell tumors were treated with radiation using a cobalt 60 teletherapy unit (15 fractions of 3.2 Gy for a total of 48 Gy). Twenty-four of the dogs underwent prophylactic regional lymph node irradiation. Three (6.7%) dogs had tumor recurrence, two (4.4%) dogs developed metastasis, and 14 (31%) dogs developed a second cutaneous mast cell tumor. No difference in overall survival rate was observed between the dogs receiving and not receiving prophylactic irradiation of the regional lymph node.
    Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 42(6):430-4. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ten dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were treated with a combination of once-weekly coarse fraction radiation therapy (six weekly fractions of 5.75 Gray [Gy]), mitoxantrone chemotherapy, and piroxicam. All dogs completed the radiation therapy protocol, and only minimal side effects were observed. Only two (22%) dogs achieved a measurable partial response; however, 90% of the dogs had amelioration of their urinary clinical signs. The median survival time for all dogs was 326 days. While this treatment protocol was well tolerated, the response rate and overall survival duration was not superior to reports using mitoxantrone and piroxicam without radiation therapy in dogs with TCC.
    Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 40(2):131-6. · 0.76 Impact Factor