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Publications (17)75.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To describe fracture rates, back pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and prior bisphosphonate therapy, treated with teriparatide for up to 18 months and followed up for a further 18 months. Prospective, multinational, and observational study. Data on prior bisphosphonate use, clinical fractures, back pain visual analog scale (VAS), and HRQoL (EQ-5D) were collected over 36 months. Fracture data were summarized in 6-month intervals and analyzed using logistic regression with repeated measures. Changes from baseline in back pain VAS and EQ-VAS were analyzed using a repeated measures model. Of the 1581 enrolled patients with follow-up data, 1161 (73.4%) had a history of prior bisphosphonate use (median duration: 36 months). Of them, 169 (14.6%) sustained ≥1 fracture during 36-month follow-up. Adjusted odds of fracture were significantly decreased at each 6-month interval compared with the first 6 months of teriparatide treatment: 37% decrease in the 12 to <18 months period during teriparatide treatment (P=0.03) and a 76% decrease in the 12- to 18-month period after teriparatide was discontinued (P<0.001). Significant reductions in back pain and improvement in HRQoL were observed. Postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis previously treated with bisphosphonates had a significant reduction in the incidence of fractures compared with the first 6 months of therapy, a reduction in back pain and an improvement in HRQoL during up to 18 months of teriparatide treatment. These outcomes were still evident for at least 18 months after teriparatide was discontinued. The results should be interpreted in the context of an uncontrolled, observational study in a routine clinical setting.
    European Journal of Endocrinology 11/2011; 166(1):87-97. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the changes in biochemical markers of bone formation during the first 6 months of teriparatide therapy in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis according to previous antiresorptive treatment. Prior therapy does not adversely affect the response to teriparatide treatment. Similar bone markers levels are reached after 6 months of treatment. INTRODUCTION: The response of biochemical markers of bone turnover with teriparatide therapy in subjects who have previously received osteoporosis drugs is not fully elucidated. We examined biochemical markers of bone formation in women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide and determined: (1) whether the response is associated with prior osteoporosis therapy, (2) which marker shows the best performance for detecting a response to therapy, and (3) the correlations between early changes in bone markers and subsequent bone mineral density (BMD) changes after 24 months of teriparatide. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, open-label, 24-month study at 95 centers in 10 countries in 758 postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis (n = 181 treatment-naïve) who had at least one post-baseline bone marker determination. Teriparatide (20 μg/day) was administered for up to 24 months. We measured procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP), and total alkaline phosphatase (t-ALP) at baseline, 1 and 6 months, and change in BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck from baseline to 24 months. RESULTS: Significant increases in formation markers occurred after 1 month of teriparatide regardless of prior osteoporosis therapy. The absolute increase at 1 month was lower in previously treated versus treatment-naïve patients, but after 6 months all groups reached similar levels. PINP showed the best signal-to-noise ratio. Baseline PINP correlated positively and significantly with BMD response at 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the long-term responsiveness of bone formation markers to teriparatide is not affected in subjects previously treated with antiresorptive drugs.
    Osteoporosis International 06/2011; 22(6):1935-46. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To observe and compare back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in postmenopausal women with a prior unsatisfactory response to antiresorptive therapy, treated with teriparatide (TPTD) or alternative treatments in normal clinical practice. Prospective, observational, multicentre, 24-month study of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. A back pain and HRQoL questionnaire (European Quality of Life Questionnaire, EQ-5D) including visual analogue scale (VAS) was completed at each visit. A total of 153 patients were enrolled, 105 patients started TPTD treatment during the study (TPTD cohort) and 48 patients did not take TPTD treatment at any time during the study (non-TPTD cohort). Four patients did not meet the inclusion criteria for the study. Of the patients in the non-TPTD cohort, 31 (68.9%) took antiresorptives during the study. The patients selected by the investigator for teriparatide treatment were distinctly different from those not selected. At baseline, the mean back pain VAS was greater in the TPTD than the non-TPTD cohort, 64  mm and 42 mm, respectively (p < 0.001). During the study, compared with baseline, the mean back pain VAS decreased in the TPTD cohort at all visits (p < 0.001). In the non-TPTD cohort, a transitory decrease in the mean after 12 months was observed (-10 mm, p = 0.023) only. After 24 months, the mean back pain VAS improved in the TPTD cohort (-36 mm, p < 0.001) while no change was observed in the non-TPTD cohort (-4 mm, p = 0.467). At baseline, the mean EQ-VAS was lower in the TPTD than in the non-TPTD cohort, 40.8 and 55.2, respectively (p < 0.001). After 24 months, EQ-VAS improved in both cohorts (TPTD 34, p < 0.001 and non-TPTD 9, p = 0.026). TPTD-treated patients had more back pain and lower HRQoL at baseline. In the TPTD cohort the mean value was consistently and significantly improved in back pain and quality of life. In the non-TPTD cohort, the mean improvement in back pain and QoL was inconsistent possibly due to the initially higher QoL and lower back pain leaving less room for improvement. These results should be interpreted in the context of limitations related to a non-randomised observational study.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 02/2011; 27(2):343-53. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this observational study in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis, the incidence of fractures was decreased during 18 months of teriparatide treatment with no evidence of further change in the subsequent 18-month post-teriparatide period when most patients took other osteoporosis medications. Fracture reduction was accompanied by reductions in back pain. To describe fracture outcomes and back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis during 18 months of teriparatide treatment and 18 months post-teriparatide in normal clinical practice. The European Forsteo Observational Study (EFOS) was a prospective, multinational, observational study. Data on incident clinical fractures and back pain (100 mm Visual Analogue Scale [VAS] and questionnaire) were collected. Fracture data were summarised in 6-month intervals and analysed using logistic regression with repeated measures. Changes from baseline in back pain VAS were analysed using a repeated measures model. A total of 208 (13.2%) of 1,576 patients sustained 258 fractures during 36 months of follow-up: 34% were clinical vertebral fractures and 66% non-vertebral fractures. The adjusted odds of fracture were reduced during teriparatide treatment and there was no evidence of further change in the 18-month post-teriparatide period, during which 63.3% patients took bisphosphonates. A 74% decrease in the adjusted odds of fracture in the 30- to <36-month period compared with the first 6-month period was observed (p < 0.001). Back pain decreased during teriparatide treatment and this decrease was sustained after teriparatide discontinuation. Adjusted mean back pain VAS decreased by 26.3 mm after 36 months (p < 0.001) from baseline mean of 57.8 mm. In a real-life clinical setting, the risk of fracture decreased during teriparatide treatment, with no evidence of further change after teriparatide was discontinued. The changes in back pain seen during treatment were maintained for at least 18 months after teriparatide discontinuation. These results should be interpreted in the context of the design of an observational study.
    Osteoporosis International 11/2010; 22(10):2709-19. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the changes in biochemical markers of bone formation during the first 6 months of teriparatide therapy in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis according to previous antiresorptive treatment. Prior therapy does not adversely affect the response to teriparatide treatment. Similar bone markers levels are reached after 6 months of treatment. The response of biochemical markers of bone turnover with teriparatide therapy in subjects who have previously received osteoporosis drugs is not fully elucidated. We examined biochemical markers of bone formation in women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide and determined: (1) whether the response is associated with prior osteoporosis therapy, (2) which marker shows the best performance for detecting a response to therapy, and (3) the correlations between early changes in bone markers and subsequent bone mineral density (BMD) changes after 24 months of teriparatide. We conducted a prospective, open-label, 24-month study at 95 centers in 10 countries in 758 postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis (n = 181 treatment-naïve) who had at least one post-baseline bone marker determination. Teriparatide (20 μg/day) was administered for up to 24 months. We measured procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP), and total alkaline phosphatase (t-ALP) at baseline, 1 and 6 months, and change in BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck from baseline to 24 months. Significant increases in formation markers occurred after 1 month of teriparatide regardless of prior osteoporosis therapy. The absolute increase at 1 month was lower in previously treated versus treatment-naïve patients, but after 6 months all groups reached similar levels. PINP showed the best signal-to-noise ratio. Baseline PINP correlated positively and significantly with BMD response at 24 months. This study suggests that the long-term responsiveness of bone formation markers to teriparatide is not affected in subjects previously treated with antiresorptive drugs.
    Osteoporosis International 10/2010; 22(6):1935-46. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment. This prospective, controlled, randomised, open-label, 2-year study enrolled 868 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and a recent fragility fracture. After 12 months of teriparatide (20 microg/day), 507 patients were randomised to further teriparatide (n = 305), raloxifene 60 mg/day (n = 100), or no active treatment (n = 102) for another 12 months (substudy 1); in substudy 2, 199 patients continued teriparatide. All received calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Back pain was self-assessed by patients using a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Changes in back pain were analysed using a mixed model for repeated measures. During year 1, back pain decreased from a mean (SD) of 48.9 mm (24.0) at baseline by 11.5 mm (p < 0.001) in the total study population. In substudy 1, mean change in back pain from month 12 (randomisation) to 24 months was -2.2, -4.4 and +0.7 mm in the teriparatide (p = 0.076), raloxifene (p = 0.041), and no active treatment groups (p = 0.751). There were no between-group differences from randomization to 18 or 24 months. In a sensitivity analysis excluding patients with low baseline back pain (VAS < 30 mm), mean change from randomisation to endpoint was significant for teriparatide (-3.9 mm, p = 0.006) and raloxifene (-6.3 mm, p = 0.018) groups. Subgroup analyses of 503 patients who received teriparatide for up to 2 years showed that patients with a recent vertebral fracture had a greater decrease in back pain than those without (p < 0.05). Those with and without mild back pain (>or=30 mm), and those with and without severe back pain (>or=60 mm) at baseline all had a statistically significant reduction in back pain after 24 months (p < 0.05). Teriparatide treatment is associated with significant reductions in back pain regardless of the presence of recent vertebral fracture. These results need to be considered with caution due to the open-label design of the study.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 08/2010; 26(8):1799-807. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This prospective, controlled, randomised, open-label, 2-year study enrolled 868 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and a recent fragility fracture. After 12 months of teriparatide (20 microg/day), 507 patients were randomised to further teriparatide (n = 305), raloxifene 60 mg/day (n = 100), or no active treatment (n = 102) for another 12 months (substudy 1); in substudy 2, 199 patients continued teriparatide. All received calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Back pain was self-assessed by patients using a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Changes in back pain were analysed using a mixed model for repeated measures. RESULTS: During year 1, back pain decreased from a mean (SD) of 48.9 mm (24.0) at baseline by 11.5 mm (p < 0.001) in the total study population. In substudy 1, mean change in back pain from month 12 (randomisation) to 24 months was -2.2, -4.4 and +0.7 mm in the teriparatide (p = 0.076), raloxifene (p = 0.041), and no active treatment groups (p = 0.751). There were no between-group differences from randomization to 18 or 24 months. In a sensitivity analysis excluding patients with low baseline back pain (VAS < 30 mm), mean change from randomisation to endpoint was significant for teriparatide (-3.9 mm, p = 0.006) and raloxifene (-6.3 mm, p = 0.018) groups. Subgroup analyses of 503 patients who received teriparatide for up to 2 years showed that patients with a recent vertebral fracture had a greater decrease in back pain than those without (p < 0.05). Those with and without mild back pain (>or=30 mm), and those with and without severe back pain (>or=60 mm) at baseline all had a statistically significant reduction in back pain after 24 months (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Teriparatide treatment is associated with significant reductions in back pain regardless of the presence of recent vertebral fracture. These results need to be considered with caution due to the open-label design of the study.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 08/2010; 26(8):1799-807. · 2.37 Impact Factor
  • Bone 01/2010; 47. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The European Forsteo Observational Study was designed to examine the effectiveness of teriparatide in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated for up to 18 months in normal clinical practice in eight European countries. The incidence of clinical vertebral and nonvertebral fragility fractures, back pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL, EQ-5D) were assessed. Spontaneous reports of adverse events were collected. All 1,648 enrolled women were teriparatide treatment-naive, 91.0% of them had previously received other anti-osteoporosis drugs, and 72.8% completed the 18-month study. A total of 168 incident clinical fractures were sustained by 138 (8.8%) women (821 fractures/10,000 patient-years). A 47% decrease in the odds of fracture in the last 6-month period compared to the first 6-month period was observed (P < 0.005). Mean back pain VAS was reduced by 25.8 mm at end point (P < 0.001). Mean change from baseline in EQ-VAS was 13 mm by 18 months. The largest improvements were reported in the EQ-5D subdomains of usual activities and pain/discomfort. There were 365 adverse events spontaneously reported, of which 48.0% were considered related to teriparatide; adverse events were the reason for discontinuation for 79 (5.8%) patients. In conclusion, postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who were prescribed teriparatide in standard clinical practice had a significant reduction in the incidence of fragility fractures and a reduction in back pain over an 18-month treatment period. This was associated with a clinically significant improvement in HRQoL. Safety was consistent with current prescribing information. These results should be interpreted in the context of the open-label, noncontrolled design of the study.
    Calcified Tissue International 10/2009; 85(6):484-93. · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is unclear which treatment should be given after stopping teriparatide therapy for severe osteoporosis. In a prospective, randomized, controlled, 2-yr study, we compared BMD effects and clinical safety of three follow-up treatments (anabolic with teriparatide, antiresorptive with raloxifene, or no active treatment) after 1 yr of teriparatide. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and a recent fragility fracture received open-label teriparatide (20 microg/d) for 12 mo before they were randomized (3:1:1) to continue teriparatide (n = 305), switch to raloxifene 60 mg/d (n = 100), or receive no active treatment for the second year (n = 102). All patients received calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Changes in areal BMD from baseline to 24 mo were analyzed using mixed-model repeated measures. Daily teriparatide treatment for 2 yr significantly increased spine BMD by 10.7%. Patients receiving raloxifene in year 2 had no further change in spine BMD from year 1 (change from baseline, 7.9%), whereas patients receiving no active treatment had a BMD decrease of 2.5% in year 2 (change from baseline, +3.8%). At the total hip, BMD increases from baseline at 2 yr were 2.5% with teriparatide, 2.3% with raloxifene, and 0.5% with no active treatment; the respective changes at the femoral neck were 3.5%, 3.1%, and 1.3%. The study had insufficient power to assess antifracture efficacy. In conclusion, BMD increases progressively over 2 yr of teriparatide therapy in women with severe osteoporosis. After discontinuation of teriparatide, raloxifene maintains spine BMD and increases hip BMD.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 01/2009; 24(4):726-36. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • Bone 01/2009; 44. · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Bone 01/2009; 44. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous antiresorptive (AR) treatment may influence the response to teriparatide. We examined BMD response and safety in a subgroup of 503 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 mo. Patients were divided into three groups based on their prior AR treatment: treatment-naïve (n = 84); pretreated with no evidence of inadequate treatment response (n = 134); and pretreated showing an inadequate response to AR treatment (n = 285), which was predefined based on the occurrence of fractures, persistent low BMD, and/or significant BMD loss while on therapy. Changes in BMD from baseline were analyzed using mixed model repeated measures. Lumbar spine BMD increased significantly from baseline at 6, 12, 18, and 24 mo in all three groups. The mean gain in spine BMD over 24 mo was greater in the treatment-naïve group (0.095 g/cm(2); 13.1%) than in the AR pretreated (0.074 g/cm(2); 10.2%; p < 0.005) and inadequate AR responder (0.071 g/cm(2); 9.8%; p < 0.001) groups. The corresponding increases in total hip BMD were 3.8%, 2.3%, and 2.3%, respectively. Early decreases in hip BMD in the inadequate AR responder group were reversed by 18 mo of treatment. Increases in BMD between 18 and 24 mo were highly significant. Nausea (13.3%) and arthralgia (11.7%) were the most commonly reported adverse events. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia was reported in 5.0% of patients. Teriparatide treatment for 24 mo is associated with a significant increase in BMD in patients with and without previous AR use. Prior AR treatment modestly blunted the BMD response to teriparatide. Safety was consistent with current prescribing label information.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 10/2008; 23(10):1591-600. · 6.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: EUROFORS was a 2-yr prospective, randomized trial of postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis, designed to investigate various sequential treatments after teriparatide 20 microg/d for 1 yr. The present secondary analysis examined the effects of 2 yr of open-label teriparatide in women previously treated with antiresorptive drugs for at least 1 yr. A subgroup of 245 women with osteoporosis who had 2 yr of teriparatide treatment were stratified by previous predominant antiresorptive treatment into four groups: alendronate (n=107), risedronate (n=59), etidronate (n=30), and non-bisphosphonate (n=49). Bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine and hip was determined after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and bone formation markers were measured after 1 and 6 months. Significant increases in bone formation markers occurred in all groups after 1 month of teriparatide treatment. Lumbar spine BMD increased at all visits, whereas a transient decrease in hip BMD, which was subsequently reversed, was observed in all groups. BMD responses were similar in all previous antiresorptive groups. Previous etidronate users showed a higher increase at the spine but not at the hip BMD. Duration of previous antiresorptive therapy and lag time between stopping previous therapy and starting teriparatide did not affect the BMD response at any skeletal site. Treatment-emergent adverse events were similar to those reported in treatment-naive postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide. Teriparatide induces positive effects on BMD and markers of bone formation in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis, regardless of previous long-term exposure to antiresorptive therapies.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 04/2008; 93(3):852-60. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous antiresorptive (AR) treatment may influence the response to teriparatide. We examined BMD response and safety in a subgroup of 503 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 mo. Patients were divided into three groups based on their prior AR treatment: treatment-naïve (n = 84); pretreated with no evidence of inadequate treatment response (n = 134); and pretreated showing an inadequate response to AR treatment (n = 285), which was predefined based on the occurrence of fractures, persistent low BMD, and/or significant BMD loss while on therapy. Changes in BMD from baseline were analyzed using mixed model repeated measures. Lumbar spine BMD increased significantly from baseline at 6, 12, 18, and 24 mo in all three groups. The mean gain in spine BMD over 24 mo was greater in the treatment-naïve group (0.095 g/cm(2); 13.1%) than in the AR pretreated (0.074 g/cm(2); 10.2%; p < 0.005) and inadequate AR responder (0.071 g/cm(2); 9.8%; p < 0.001) groups. The corresponding increases in total hip BMD were 3.8%, 2.3%, and 2.3%, respectively. Early decreases in hip BMD in the inadequate AR responder group were reversed by 18 mo of treatment. Increases in BMD between 18 and 24 mo were highly significant. Nausea (13.3%) and arthralgia (11.7%) were the most commonly reported adverse events. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia was reported in 5.0% of patients. Teriparatide treatment for 24 mo is associated with a significant increase in BMD in patients with and without previous AR use. Prior AR treatment modestly blunted the BMD response to teriparatide. Safety was consistent with current prescribing label information.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 01/2008; 23(10):1591-600. · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a method for microstructural analysis of vertebral trabecular bone in vivo based on HRCT. When applied to monitor teriparatide treatment, changes in structural variables exceeded and were partially independent of changes in volumetric BMD. Monitoring of osteoporosis therapy based solely on bone densitometry is insufficient to assess anti-fracture efficacy. Assessing bone microstructure in vivo is therefore of importance. We studied whether it is possible to monitor effects of teriparatide on vertebral trabecular microstructure independent of BMD by high-resolution CT (HRCT). In a subset of 65 postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis who participated in the EUROFORS study, HRCT scans of T(12), quantitative CT of L(1)-L(3), and DXA of L(1)-L(4) were performed after 0, 6, and 12 mo of teriparatide treatment (20 microg/d). We compared BMD and 3D microstructural variables in three groups of women, based on prior antiresorptive treatment: treatment-naïve; pretreated; and pretreated women showing inadequate response to treatment. We found statistically highly significant increases in most microstructural variables and BMD 6 mo after starting teriparatide. After 12 mo, apparent bone volume fraction (app. BV/TV) increased by 30.6 +/- 4.4% (SE), and apparent trabecular number (app. Tb.N.) increased by 19.0 +/- 3.2% compared with 6.4 +/- 0.7% for areal and 19.3 +/- 2.6% for volumetric BMD. The structural changes were partially independent of BMD as shown by a significantly larger standardized increase and a standardized long-term precision at least as good as DXA. Patients who had shown inadequate response to prior osteoporosis treatment did show improvements in BMD and structural measures comparable to treatment-naïve patients. HRCT is a feasible method for longitudinal microstructural analysis of human vertebrae in vivo, offers information beyond BMD, and is sufficiently precise to show profound effects of teriparatide after 12 mo.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 10/2007; 22(9):1426-33. · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: EUROFORS was a 2-yr prospective, randomized trial of postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis, designed to investigate various sequential treatments after teriparatide 20 microg/d for 1 yr. The present secondary analysis examined the effects of 2 yr of open-label teriparatide in women previously treated with antiresorptive drugs for at least 1 yr. METHODS: A subgroup of 245 women with osteoporosis who had 2 yr of teriparatide treatment were stratified by previous predominant antiresorptive treatment into four groups: alendronate (n=107), risedronate (n=59), etidronate (n=30), and non-bisphosphonate (n=49). Bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine and hip was determined after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and bone formation markers were measured after 1 and 6 months. RESULTS: Significant increases in bone formation markers occurred in all groups after 1 month of teriparatide treatment. Lumbar spine BMD increased at all visits, whereas a transient decrease in hip BMD, which was subsequently reversed, was observed in all groups. BMD responses were similar in all previous antiresorptive groups. Previous etidronate users showed a higher increase at the spine but not at the hip BMD. Duration of previous antiresorptive therapy and lag time between stopping previous therapy and starting teriparatide did not affect the BMD response at any skeletal site. Treatment-emergent adverse events were similar to those reported in treatment-naive postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide. CONCLUSIONS: Teriparatide induces positive effects on BMD and markers of bone formation in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis, regardless of previous long-term exposure to antiresorptive therapies.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 01/2007; 93(3):852-60. · 6.31 Impact Factor