B C Tilly

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (38)194.16 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and filter-grown monolayers of primary cultures of shark rectal gland (SRG) epithelial cells were used to analyze the signal transduction pathway by which CNP stimulates chloride secretion. CNP binds to natriuretic receptors in the basolateral membrane, elevates cGMP, and opens CFTR chloride channels in the apical membrane. CNP-provoked chloride secretion was completely inhibitable by the nonspecific protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine and the PKA inhibitor H89, but insensitive to H8, an inhibitor of type I and II isoforms of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKI, cGKII). CNP-induced secretion could not be mimicked by non-hydrolysable cGMP analogs added alone or in combination with the protein kinase C activator phorbolester, arguing against a role for cGK or for. cGMP-induced PKC signalling. We failed to detect a dogfish ortholog of cGKII by molecular cloning and affinity chromatography. However, inhibitors of the cGMP-inhibitable isoform of phosphodiesterase (PDE3) including milrinone, amrinone and cilostamide, but not inhibitors of other PDE isoenzymes mimicked the effect of CNP on chloride secretion in perfused glands and monolayers. CNP raised cGMP and cAMP levels in the SRG epithelial cells. This rise in cAMP as well as the CNP- and amrinone-provoked chloride secretion, but not the rise in cGMP was almost completely blocked by the Gαi-coupled adenylyl cyclase inhibitor somatostatin, arguing against a role for cGMP cross-activation of PKA in CNP action. These data provide molecular, functional and pharmacological evidence for a CNP/cGMP/PDE3/cAMP/PKA signalling cascade coupled to CFTR in the SRG.
    AJP Cell Physiology 11/2013; · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: F508delCFTR-, but not wtCFTR-, expressing fibroblasts resemble Niemann Pick type C cells in the massive intracellular accumulation of free cholesterol. The recruitment and activation of F508delCFTR by cholesterol depletion was studied. Filipin staining, forskolin-stimulated anion efflux and FITC-dextran uptake were studied in control cells and fibroblasts treated with 2-hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin phosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles to deplete cellular free cholesterol. Treatment of F508delCFTR-, but not wtCFTR-, expressing fibroblasts with 2-hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin resulted in a reduction in cellular cholesterol and a potentiation of the forskolin-induced anion efflux. In addition, forskolin also promoted a massive increase in the rate of endocytosis in F508delCFTR fibroblasts, which was absent in genistein- or cyclodextrin-treated cultures. The results not only suggest that reducing cellular cholesterol may serve as pharmacotherapeutic tool in the treatment of cystic fibrosis but also reveal a novel mechanism for genistein regulation of F508delCFTR, i.e. retention by inhibition of endocytosis.
    Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry 02/2007; 20(5):473-82. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most cells have to perform their physiological functions under a variable osmotic stress, which, because of the relatively high permeability of the plasma membrane for water, may result in frequent alterations in cell size. Intestinal epithelial cells are especially prone to changes in cell volume because of their high capacity of salt and water transport and the high membrane expression of various nutrient transporters. Therefore, to avoid excessive shrinkage or swelling, enterocytes, like most cell types, have developed efficient mechanisms to maintain osmotic balance. This chapter reviews selected model systems that can be used to investigate cell volume regulation in intestinal epithelial cells, with emphasis on the regulatory volume decrease, and the methods available to study the compensatory redistribution of (organic) osmolytes. In addition, a brief summary is presented of the pathways involved in osmosensing and osmosignaling in the intestine.
    Methods in Enzymology 02/2007; 428:325-42. · 2.00 Impact Factor
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 12/2006; 488(1):491 - 502. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of high cholesterol-containing microdomains in the signal transduction cascade leading to the activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) was studied. Osmotic cell swelling-induced efflux of 125I- was determined in human epithelial Intestine 407 cells and in skin fibroblasts obtained from healthy controls or Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) patients. Cellular cholesterol content was modulated by pre-incubation with 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin in the presence of acceptor lipid vesicles. Osmotic cell swelling of human Intestine 407 cells leads to the rapid activation of a compensatory anion conductance. Treatment of the cells with cyclodextrin enhanced the response to submaximal hypotonic stimulation by approx. twofold, but did not further increase the efflux elicited by a saturating stimulus. In contrast, the volume-sensitive anion efflux was markedly inhibited when cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin was used. Potentiation of the response by cholesterol depletion was maintained in caveolin-1 deficient Caco-2 colonocytes as well as in sphingomyelinase-treated Intestine 407 cells, indicating that cholesterol-rich microdomains are not crucially involved. However, treatment of the cells with progesterone, an inhibitor of NPC1-dependent endosomal cholesterol trafficking, not only markedly reduced the hypotonicity-provoked anion efflux, but also prevented its potentiation by cyclodextrin. In addition, the volume-sensitive anion efflux from human NPC skin fibroblasts was significantly smaller when compared with control fibroblasts. The results support a model of regulatory volume decrease involving recruitment of volume-sensitive anion channels from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane.
    Acta Physiologica 01/2006; 187(1-2):295-303. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human Intestine 407 cells respond to osmotic cell swelling by the activation of Cl(-)- and K(+)-selective ionic channels, as well as by stimulating an organic osmolyte release pathway readily permeable to taurine and phosphocholine. Unlike the activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC), activation of the organic osmolyte release pathway shows a lag time of approximately 30-60 s, and its activity persists for at least 8-12 min. In contrast to VRAC activation, stimulation of organic osmolyte release did not require protein tyrosine phosphorylation, active p21(rho), or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and was insensitive to Cl(-) channel blockers. Treatment of the cells with putative organic anion transporter inhibitors reduced the release of taurine only partially or was found to be ineffective. The efflux was blocked by a subclass of organic cation transporter (OCT) inhibitors (cyanine-863 and decynium-22) but not by other OCT inhibitors (cimetidine, quinine, and verapamil). Brief treatment of the cells with phorbol esters potentiated the cell swelling-induced taurine efflux, whereas addition of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X largely inhibited the response, suggesting that PKC is involved. Increasing the level of intracellular Ca(2+) by using A-23187- or Ca(2+)-mobilizing hormones, however, did not affect the magnitude of the response. Taken together, the results indicate that the hypotonicity-induced efflux of organic osmolytes is independent of VRAC and involves a PKC-dependent step.
    AJP Cell Physiology 07/2004; 286(6):C1417-22. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In response to osmotic cell swelling, Intestine 407 cells react with a rapid and transient activation of phospholipase D (PLD). To investigate the role of PLD during the regulatory volume decrease, cells were treated with 1-butanol resulting in a depletion of PLD substrates. Activation of volume-regulated anion channels, but not the cell swelling-induced release of taurine, was largely inhibited in the presence of low concentrations of 1-butanol. In addition, hypotonicity-induced exocytosis, ATP release and subsequent endocytosis were found to be largely abrogated. The results support a model of cell volume regulation in which PLD plays an essential role in the cell swelling-induced vesicle cycling and in the activation of volume-sensitive anion channels.
    FEBS Letters 06/2004; 566(1-3):287-90. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An inwardly rectifying anion channel in malaria-infected red blood cells has been proposed to function as the "new permeation pathway" for parasite nutrient acquisition. As the channel shares several properties with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), we tested their interrelationship by whole-cell current measurements in Plasmodium falciparum-infected and uninfected red blood cells from control and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A CFTR-like linear chloride conductance as well as a malaria parasite-induced and a shrinkage-activated endogenous inwardly rectifying chloride conductance with properties identical to the malaria-induced channel were all found to be defective in CF erythrocytes. Surprisingly, the absence of the inwardly rectifying chloride conductance in CF erythrocytes had no gross effect on in vitro parasite growth or new permeation pathway activity, supporting an argument against a close association between the Plasmodium-activated chloride channel and the new permeation pathway. The functional expression of CFTR in red blood cells opens new perspectives to exploit the erythrocyte as a readily available cell type in electrophysiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic studies of CF.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 04/2004; 279(11):10316-22. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A plethora of signaling cascades is activated upon hyposmotic stimulation of mammalian cells. In Intestine 407 cells, p21Rho as well as tyrosine kinase(s) and PtdIns-3- kinase were found to be a prerequisite for VRAC activation, whereas protein kinase C is likely to be involved in the regulation of a distinct organic osmolyte release pathway. In addition, a number of cellular responses are able to modulate the volume-sensitive anion conductance including Ca2+mobilization, cytoskeletal re-arrangements and vesicle cycling. The molecular mechanism(s) by which these signaling molecules affect ion channel opening is still fragmentary and detailed investigations into the mode of activation including reconstitution studies are hampered by the current lack of information about the molecular identity of the channel(s) involved. Our observation that at least part of the anion channel activation occurs through their recruitment from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane now adds intracellular Cl?channels to the list of potential VRAC candidates.Other signaling pathways, like the stress kinases p38 and Jnk as well as the ATP-provoked activation of Erk-1/2, are apparently not involved in channel regulation. Although their physiological role in the RVD response remains to be elucidated, it is tempting to speculate that they may have a function in restoring cellular homeostasis and in maintaining cell viability.
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology 02/2004; 559:339-47. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osmotic swelling of Intestine 407 cells leads to an immediate increase in cell surface membrane area as determined using the fluorescent membrane dye FM 1-43. In addition, as measured by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-dextran uptake, a robust (>100-fold) increase in the rate of endocytosis was observed, starting after a discrete lag time of 2-3 min and lasting for approximately 10-15 min. The hypotonicity-induced increase in membrane surface area, like the cell swelling-induced release of ATP (Van der Wijk, T., De Jonge, H. R., and Tilly, B. C. (1999) Biochem. J. 343, 579-586), was diminished after 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester loading or cytochalasin B treatment. Uptake of TRITC-dextrans, however, was not affected. Treatment of the cells with the vesicle-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-specific protease Clostridium botulinum toxin F not only nearly eliminated the hypotonicity-induced increase in membrane surface area but also strongly diminished the release of ATP, indicating the involvement of regulated exocytosis. Both the ATP hydrolase apyrase and the MEK inhibitor PD098059 diminished the osmotic swelling-induced increase in membrane surface area as well as the subsequent uptake of TRITC-dextrans. Taken together, the results indicate that extracellular ATP is required for the hypotonicity-induced vesicle recycling and suggest that a positive feedback loop, involving purinergic activation of the Erk-1/2 pathway, may contribute to the release of ATP from hypo-osmotically stimulated cells.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2003; 278(41):40020-5. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To date various types of Cl(-) currents have been recorded in cardiac myocytes from different regions of the heart and from different species. Most of these are silent under basal conditions, but are rapidly activated under the influence of various agonists or physical stress that, in the long term, also lead to development of hypertrophy. Previously, we identified three different Cl(-) channel activities in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes: (i) Ca(2+) regulated, (ii) cAMP regulated (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channels) and (iii) osmoregulated Cl(-) channels. In this study, we examined comparatively the effects of cyclic stretch and endothelin-1 (ET-1) on Cl(-) channel activity in primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes using an (125)I-efflux assay. About 4 min after the start of the (125)I-efflux (mean basal rate amounts 6.3% of total (125)I incorporated/min), the addition of 10 nM ET-1 or the application of cyclic stretch rapidly and transiently increased (125)I-efflux by 3.8%/min and 0.8%/min respectively above the basal rate. The stretch induced (125)I-efflux rate could be blocked by 100 microM Gd(3+) but it had no effect on the ET-1 response. After 24 h stimulation by ET-1 or cyclic stretch the myocytes responded by hypertrophy which is detected by increases of (3)H-leucine incorporation into protein and protein/DNA ratio. In conclusion, cyclic stretch as well as ET rapidly and transiently activate Cl(-) channels in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. The results suggest that the activation of distinct types of Cl(-) channels (co)transduce the stretch- and agonist-induced hypertrophic responses in these myocytes.
    Clinical Science 09/2002; 103 Suppl 48:148S-151S. · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • H R de Jonge, B Hogema, B C Tilly
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    ABSTRACT: N-myristoylation is a covalent protein modification that can promote the association of proteins with membranes. De Jonge, Hogema, and Tilly discuss how N-myristoylation may be involved in triggering Fas ligand-induced apoptosis in mammals, and in adapting to conditions of high salt in plants. The pro-apoptotic protein BID is unique in that its proteolytic cleavage product, tBID, is posttranslationally myristoylated. In contrast, the plant accessory protein SOS3 undergoes "classical" cotranslational N-myristoylation. N-myristoylation is essential for the proper functioning of these proteins in regulating the signaling pathways (apoptosis and adaptation to salt stress, respectively) in which they are involved.
    Science s STKE 01/2001; 2000(63):pe1.
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    ABSTRACT: Most mammalian cells have developed compensatory mechanisms to respond to the variable osmotic stress caused by changes in the concentrations of intracellular osmo-active substances (e.g. glucose, amino acids, lactate) or by variations in the osmolarity of the surrounding medium. In response to osmotic cell swelling, the Regulatory Volume Decrease (RVD) is triggered and directs a reduction in the tonicity of the cell by the concerted opening of cation and anion selective ion channels. To date, the K(+) and Cl(-) conductances activated upon hypo-osmotic stimulation have been characterised electrophysiologically in many different cell systems. The molecular identity of the channels however, as well as the mechanism(s) involved in their activation have not yet been fully clarified and may differ between cell types. In this review, we will evaluate the different signalling pathways activated by osmotic cell swelling and discuss their putative role(s) in ion channel regulation, in maintaining cellular volume homeostasis, and in auto- and paracrinic signal transduction, with emphasis on intestinal epithelial cells.
    Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry 02/2000; 10(5-6):289-96. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human intestine 407 cells respond to hypo-osmotic stress by the rapid release of ATP into the extracellular medium. A difference in the time course of activation as well as in the sensitivity to cytochalasin B treatment and BAPTA-AM [1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid acetoxymethyl ester] loading suggests that ATP leaves the cell through a pathway distinct from volume-regulated anion channels. To evaluate a putative role for nucleotides as autocrinic/paracrinic factors in osmotic signalling, the effects of extracellular ATP on the regulation of volume-sensitive anion channels as well as on the hypotonicity-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (Erk-1/2) were investigated. Micromolar concentrations of ATP were unable to elicit an isotope efflux from (125)I(-)-loaded cells by itself, but strongly potentiated the hypotonicity-provoked anion efflux through a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. The order of potency of nucleotides (ATP = UTP = ATP[S] > ADP = AMP > adenosine = cAMP) indicated the involvement of P2Y(2) receptors. In contrast, millimolar concentrations of ATP markedly inhibited both the osmotically induced isotope efflux and whole-cell Cl(-) currents. Inhibition of whole-cell Cl(-) currents, not only by millimolar ATP but also by the purinoceptor antagonists suramin and reactive blue, was observed most prominently at depolarizing holding potentials, suggesting a direct interaction with volume-sensitive Cl(-) channels rather than interaction with purinoceptors. Both ATP and UTP, at submicromolar levels, were found to act as potent activators of Erk-1/2 in intestine 407 cells. Addition of the ATP hydrolase apyrase to the bath greatly reduced the hypotonicity-induced Erk-1/2 activation, but did not affect the swelling-induced isotope efflux or whole-cell Cl(-) currents. Furthermore, pre-treatment with suramin or reactive blue almost completely prevented the hypo-osmotic activation of Erk-1/2. The results indicate that extracellularly released ATP functions as an autocrinic/paracrinic factor that mediates hypotonicity-induced Erk-1/2 activation but does not serve as an activator of volume-sensitive compensatory Cl(-) currents.
    Biochemical Journal 12/1999; 343 Pt 3:579-86. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human Intestine 407 cells respond to hypo-osmotic stress with a rapid stimulation of compensatory ionic conductances accompanied by a transient increase in the activity of the extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinases Erk-1 and Erk-2. In this study, we examined the upstream regulators of hypotonicity-induced Erk-1/Erk-2 activation and their possible role in cell-volume regulation. The hypotonicity-provoked Erk-1/Erk-2 activation was greatly reduced in cells pretreated with the specific mitogen-activated/Erk-activating kinase inhibitor PD098059 and was preceded by a transient stimulation of Raf-1. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA, GF109203X, wortmannin or Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme did not appreciably affect the hypotonicity-provoked Erk-1/Erk-2 stimulation, suggesting the osmosensitive signalling pathway to be largely independent of protein kinase C and p21(rho). In contrast, expression of dominant negative RasN17 completely abolished the hypotonicity-induced Erk-1/Erk-2 activation. Stimulation of the swelling-induced ion efflux was independent of activation of these mitogen-activated protein kinases, as revealed by hypotonicity-provoked isotope efflux from 125I-- and 86Rb+-loaded cells after pretreatment with PD098059 and after expression of RasN17. In addition, the epidermal-growth-factor-induced potentiation of the hypotonicity-provoked anionic response did not depend on the increase in Erk-1/Erk-2 activity but, instead, was found to depend on Ca2+ influx. Taken together, these results indicate that hypotonic stress induces Erk-1/Erk-2 activation through the Ras/Raf-signalling pathway, and argue against a direct role for this pathway in cell-volume control.
    Biochemical Journal 06/1998; 331 ( Pt 3):863-9. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A recently cloned isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK), designated type II, was implicated as the mediator of cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion based on its localization in the apical membrane of enterocytes and on its capacity to activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels. In contrast, the soluble type I cGK was unable to activate CFTR in intact cells, although both cGK I and cGK II could phosphorylate CFTR in vitro. To investigate the molecular basis for the cGK II isotype specificity of CFTR channel gating, we expressed cGK II or cGK I mutants possessing different membrane binding properties by using adenoviral vectors in a CFTR-transfected intestinal cell line, and we examined the ability of cGMP to phosphorylate and activate the Cl- channel. Mutation of the cGK II N-terminal myristoylation site (Gly2 --> Ala) reduced cGK II membrane binding and severely impaired cGK II activation of CFTR. Conversely, a chimeric protein, in which the N-terminal membrane-anchoring domain of cGK II was fused to the N terminus of cGK Ibeta, acquired the ability to associate with the membrane and activate the CFTR Cl- channel. The potency order of cGK constructs for activation of CFTR (cGK II > membrane-bound cGK I chimer > nonmyristoylated cGK II > cGK Ibeta) correlated with the extent of 32P incorporation into CFTR observed in parallel measurements. These results strongly support the concept that membrane targeting of cGK is a major determinant of CFTR Cl- channel activation in intact cells.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/1998; 95(4):1466-71. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to investigate the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) type II in cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion, cGMP-dependent activation and phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels was analyzed after expression of cGK II or cGK Ibeta in intact cells. An intestinal cell line which stably expresses CFTR (IEC-CF7) but contains no detectable endogenous cGK II was infected with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the cGK II coding region (Ad-cGK II) resulting in co-expression of active cGK II. In these cells, CFTR was activated by membrane-permeant analogs of cGMP or by the cGMP-elevating hormone atrial natriuretic peptide as measured by 125I- efflux assays and whole-cell patch clamp analysis. In contrast, infection with recombinant adenoviruses expressing cGK Ibeta or luciferase did not convey cGMP sensitivity to CFTR in IEC-CF7 cells. Concordant with the activation of CFTR by only cGK II, infection with Ad-cGK II but not Ad-cGK Ibeta enabled cGMP analogs to increase CFTR phosphorylation in intact cells. These and other data provide evidence that endogenous cGK II is a key mediator of cGMP-provoked activation of CFTR in cells where both proteins are co-localized, e. g. intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, they demonstrate that neither the soluble cGK Ibeta nor cAMP-dependent protein kinase are able to substitute for cGK II in this cGMP-regulated function.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 03/1997; 272(7):4195-200. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha was found to stimulate the p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling cascade in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. TNFalpha increased the activity of the p38 substrate MAP kinase-activated-protein (MAPKAP) kinase 2 and the subsequent phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein Hsp27 about two to three fold. This stimulation was blocked almost completely by the specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. This inhibitor also suppressed the TNFalpha-induced surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAP kinase had no effect on the stimulated surface expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. VCAM-1 mRNA accumulation induced by TNFalpha was not affected by SB203580, suggesting that the p38 MAP kinase signalling cascade regulates the endothelial expression of VCAM-1 at the post-transcriptional level.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 02/1997; 230(1):44-8. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypo-osmotic swelling of human Intestine 407 cells leads to a significant increase of intracellular MAPKAP-kinase 2 activity and Hsp27 phosphorylation. Pre-treatment of the cells with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB-203580 blocks this activation, indicating that the hypotonicity-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase 2 is, similarly to that described for hyperosmotic treatment, the result of an activated p38 MAP kinase cascade. The activation of MAPKAP kinase 2 proceeds with kinetics similar to that of one of the first physiological responses of hypo-osmotic treatment, the opening of compensatory Cl- channels. However, inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase cascade does not block the osmo-sensitive anion efflux and, vice versa, activation of p38 MAP kinase by cytokines and anisomycin does not increase the efflux. These results indicate that the p38 MAP kinase cascade is not directly involved in Cl- channel activation but instead may play a role in subsequent cellular repair processes.
    FEBS Letters 11/1996; 395(2-3):133-6. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypo-osmotic stimulation of human Intestine 407 cells rapidly activated compensatory CL- and K+ conductances that limited excessive cell swelling and, finally, restored the original cell volume. Osmotic cell swelling was accompanied by a rapid and transient reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton, affecting both stress fibers as well as apical ruffles. In addition, an increase in total cellular F-actin was observed. Pretreatment of the cells with recombinant Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, but not with mutant enzyme (C3-E173Q) devoid of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, greatly reduced the activation of the osmo-sensitive anion efflux, suggesting a role for the ras-related GTPase p21rho. In contrast, introducing dominant negative N17-p21rac into the cells did not affect the volume-sensitive efflux. Cell swelling-induced reorganization of F-actin coincided with a transient, C3 exoenzyme-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of p125 focal adhesion kinase (p125FAK) as well as with an increase in phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PtdIns-3-kinase) activity. Pretreatment of the cells with wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PtdIns-3-kinase, largely inhibited the volume-sensitive ion efflux. Taken together, our results indicate the involvement of a p21rho signaling cascade and actin filaments in the activation of volume-sensitive chloride channels.
    Molecular Biology of the Cell 10/1996; 7(9):1419-27. · 4.60 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
194.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2007
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
    • Netherlands Cancer Institute
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1987–1990
    • Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 1989
    • Utrecht University
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands