M S Lucas

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States

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Publications (6)49.21 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Rituximab has modest activity in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma but is associated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release that can cause CLL proliferation and inhibit apoptosis. We examined whether disruption of TNF-alpha by etanercept improves response to rituximab in CLL. Eligible patients had previously treated CLL with performance status 0-3. Patients received etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously twice weekly (weeks 1-5) and rituximab 375 mg/m(2) intravenously thrice weekly (weeks 2-5) using a phase I/II design. Primary end points were response and toxicity. The 36 enrolled patients had a median of two prior treatments; 50% were fludarabine refractory and 22% had del(17p13.1). Of the 34 response-evaluable patients, 10 (29%) responded, including 9 partial responses and 1 complete remission. Response was not affected by prior rituximab or fludarabine-refractory status, but no patients with del(17p13.1) responded. Median progression-free survival for responders was 9.0 months (range 1-43). Ten patients have had treatment-free intervals exceeding 12 months, including four who have remained untreated for 32, 43, 46 and 56 months. Adverse events were mild, including mild infusion reactions, transient cytopenias and grade 3 infections in 14% of the patients. The combination of etanercept and thrice weekly rituximab produces durable remissions in non-del(17p13.1) CLL patients and is well tolerated.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 03/2009; 23(5):912-8. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alemtuzumab (anti-CD52; Campath-1H) is effective in fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but is associated with infection and early onset neutropenia. To reduce toxicity, filgrastim (G-CSF) was administered concurrently with alemtuzumab. In total, 14 CLL patients (median age 59) with a median of 3.5 prior regimens (range 1--12) received i.v. alemtuzumab, stepped up from 3 to 30 mg the first week, then 30 mg thrice weekly for 12 weeks. Filgrastim 5 microg/kg was administered daily 5 days before and throughout alemtuzumab therapy. Six patients developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation 3--6 weeks into treatment; six patients developed fever, three neutropenia, and one pneumonia. The patient with CMV pneumonia died; ganciclovir cleared CMV in the other patients. Five patients developed early neutropenia (weeks 2--5). Four patients developed delayed neutropenia (weeks 10--13) unassociated with CMV reactivation. Nine patients ceased therapy because of infectious and hematologic toxicity. Five partial responses were noted, all in patients with lymph nodes>cm, lasting a median of 6.5 months (range 5--13). Filgrastim and alemtuzumab were given concurrently with manageable infusion toxicity and clinical activity, but the efficacy of this regimen was limited by delayed neutropenia of unclear etiology and CMV reactivation. Filgrastrim should not be administered prophylactically during alemtuzumab therapy outside clinical trials.
    Leukemia 08/2005; 19(7):1207-10. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rituximab has been reported to have little activity in small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and to be associated with significant infusion-related toxicity. This study sought to decrease the initial toxicity and optimize the pharmacokinetics with an alternative treatment schedule. Thirty three patients with SLL/CLL received dose 1 of rituximab (100 mg) over 4 hours. In cohort I (n = 3; 250 mg/m(2)) and cohort II (n = 7; 375 mg/m(2)) rituximab was administered on day 3 and thereafter three times weekly for 4 weeks using a standard administration schedule. Cohort III (n = 23; 375 mg/m(2)) administered rituximab similar to cohort II for the first two treatments and then over 1 hour thereafter. A total of 33 CLL/SLL patients were enrolled; only one patient discontinued therapy because of infusion-related toxicity. Thirteen patients developed transient hypoxemia, hypotension, or dyspnea that were associated with significant changes in baseline interleukin-6, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interferon gamma compared with those not experiencing such reactions. Infusion-related toxicity occurred more commonly in older (median age 73 v 62 years; P =.02) patients with no other pretreatment clinical or laboratory features predicting occurrence of these events. The overall response rate was 45% (3% CR, 42% PR; 95% CI 28% to 64%). Median response duration for these 15 patients was 10 months (95% CI, 6.8-13.2; range, 3 to 17+). Rituximab administered thrice weekly for 4 weeks demonstrates clinical efficacy and acceptable toxicity. Initial infusion-related events seem to be cytokine mediated and resolve by the third infusion making rapid administration possible. Future combination studies of rituximab with other therapies in CLL seem warranted.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/2001; 19(8):2153-64. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in which CD20 is expressed on tumor cells from most patients. Several small studies have suggested a benefit from the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (Rituxan, MabThera) in patients with WM. In this retrospective study, we examined the outcome of 30 previously unreported patients with WM who received treatment with single-agent rituximab (median age 60; range 32-83 years old). The median number of prior treatments for these patients was 1 (range 0-6), and 14 patients (47%) received a nucleoside analogue before rituximab therapy. Patients received a median of 4.0 (1-11.3) infusions of rituximab (375 mg/m2). Three patients received steroids with their infusions for prophylaxis of rituximab-related infusion syndrome. Overall, treatment was well tolerated. Median immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels for all patients declined from 2,403 mg/dL (range 720-7639 mg/dL) to 1,525 mg/dL (range 177-5,063 mg/dL) after rituximab therapy (p = 0.001), with 8 of 30 (27%) and 18 of 30 (60%) patients demonstrating >50% and >25% decline in IgM, respectively. Median bone marrow lymphoplasmacytic (BM LPC) cell involvement declined from 60% (range 5-90%) to 15% (range 0-80%) for 17 patients for whom pre-and post-BM biopsies were performed (p < 0.001). Moreover, 19 of 30 (63%) and 15 of 30 (50%) patients had an increase in their hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT) counts, respectively. Before rituximab therapy, 7 of 30 (23.3%) patients were either transfusion or erythropoietin dependent, whereas only 1/30 (3.3%) patients required transfusions (no erythropoietin) after rituximab. Overall responses after treatment with rituximab were as follows: 8 (27%) and 10 (33%) of the patients achieved a partial (PR) and a minor (MR) response, respectively, and an additional 9 (30%) of patients demonstrated stable disease (SD). No patients attained a complete response. The median time to treatment failure for responding (PR and MR) patients was 8.0 months (mean 8.4; range 3-20+ months), and 5.0 months (mean 6.1; range 3-12+ months) for patients with SD. These studies therefore demonstrate that rituximab is an active agent in WM. Marked increases in HCT and PLT counts were noted for most patients, including patients with WM who had MR or SD. A prospective clinical trial to more completely define the benefit of single-agent rituximab in patients with WM has been initiated by many of our centers.
    Journal of Immunotherapy 05/2001; 24(3):272-279.
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    ABSTRACT: Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in which CD20 is expressed on tumor cells from most patients. Several small studies have suggested a benefit from the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (Rituxan, MabThera) in patients with WM. In this retrospective study, we examined the outcome of 30 previously unreported patients with WM who received treatment with single-agent rituximab (median age 60; range 32-83 years old). The median number of prior treatments for these patients was 1 (range 0-6), and 14 patients (47%) received a nucleoside analogue before rituximab therapy. Patients received a median of 4.0 (1-11.3) infusions of rituximab (375 mg/m2). Three patients received steroids with their infusions for prophylaxis of rituximab-related infusion syndrome. Overall, treatment was well tolerated. Median immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels for all patients declined from 2,403 mg/dL (range 720-7639 mg/dL) to 1,525 mg/dL (range 177-5,063 mg/dL) after rituximab therapy (p = 0.001), with 8 of 30 (27%) and 18 of 30 (60%) patients demonstrating >50% and >25% decline in IgM, respectively. Median bone marrow lymphoplasmacytic (BM LPC) cell involvement declined from 60% (range 5-90%) to 15% (range 0-80%) for 17 patients for whom pre- and post-BM biopsies were performed (p < 0.001). Moreover, 19 of 30 (63%) and 15 of 30 (50%) patients had an increase in their hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT) counts, respectively. Before rituximab therapy, 7 of 30 (23.3%) patients were either transfusion or erythropoietin dependent, whereas only 1/30 (3.3%) patients required transfusions (no erythropoietin) after rituximab. Overall responses after treatment with rituximab were as follows: 8 (27%) and 10 (33%) of the patients achieved a partial (PR) and a minor (MR) response, respectively, and an additional 9 (30%) of patients demonstrated stable disease (SD). No patients attained a complete response. The median time to treatment failure for responding (PR and MR) patients was 8.0 months (mean 8.4: range 3-20+ months), and 5.0 months (mean 6.1; range 3-12+ months) for patients with SD. These studies therefore demonstrate that rituximab is an active agent in WM. Marked increases in HCT and PLT counts were noted for most patients, including patients with WM who had MR or SD. A prospective clinical trial to more completely define the benefit of single-agent rituximab in patients with WM has been initiated by many of our centers.
    Journla of Immunotherapy 04/2001; 24(3):272-9. · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the preliminary efficacy of rituximab therapy in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), we examined the clinical and laboratory data for all patients with WM treated on IDEC Pharmaceuticals sponsored trials and one patient treated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Seven symptomatic patients with WM were treated with four (n = 6) or eight (n = 1) weekly infusions of rituximab (375 mg/m2). Patients had received a median of three prior therapies (range 1-4) which included alkylator therapy in all (five patients refractory) and fludarabine in four (all refractory). Therapy was tolerated well in all patients without decrement in cellular immune function or significant infectious morbidity. Partial responses were noted in three of these patients, including two with fludarabine-refractory disease. The median progression-free survival for these patients was 6.6 months (range 2.2-29+ months). These data suggest that rituximab has clinical activity in heavily pre-treated patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Based on these data, clinical studies of Rituximab in previously untreated and treated WM appear indicated.
    Annals of Oncology 01/2000; 10(12):1525-7. · 7.38 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

353 Citations
49.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2009
    • The Ohio State University
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Division of Hematology
      Columbus, OH, United States