Karin M Dunst

Allgemeines Krankenhaus Linz, Linz, Upper Austria, Austria

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Publications (38)135.07 Total impact

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    Archives of Plastic Surgery. 09/2014; 41(5):594-6.
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    Allergy 11/2009; 65(6):798-9. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on two cases of recurrent appendicitis after conservative management consisting of antibiotics and percutaneous drainage of perityphlitic abscess. The first patient presented 13 years after acute appendicitis with a perityphlitic abscess that was treated operatively. This patient refused to undergo interval appendectomy after the initial event. The second patient with appendicitis and perityphlitic abscess was equally managed conservatively initially but presented with reperforated appendicitis and diffuse peritonitis 1 week before scheduled interval appendectomy and also had to undergo surgery. Based on our experience with these two cases, we conclude that interval appendectomy after the recommended period of 6-12 weeks might not be appropriate and may better be managed by performing it in the case of a recurrence.
    International surgery 01/2009; 94(1):27-30. · 0.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Education and training in microsurgical techniques have historically relied on the use of live animal models. Due to an increase in the numbers of microsurgical operations in recent times, the number of trainees in this highly-specialised surgical field has continued to grow. However, strict legislation, greater public awareness, and an increasing sensitivity toward the ethical aspects of scientific research and medical education, emphatically demand a significant reduction in the numbers of animals used in surgical and academic education. Hence, a growing number of articles are reporting on the use of alternatives to live animals in microsurgical education and training. In this review, we report on the current trends in the development and use of microsurgical training models, and on their potential to reduce the number of live animals used for this purpose. We also share our experiences in this field, resulting from our performance of numerous microsurgical courses each year, over more than ten years. The porcine heart, in microvascular surgery training, and the fresh chicken leg, in microneurosurgical and microvascular surgery training, are excellent models for the teaching of basic techniques to the microsurgical novice. Depending on the selected level of expertise of the trainee, these alternative models are capable of reducing the numbers of live animals used by 80-100%. For an even more enhanced, "closer-to-real-life" scenario, these non-animated vessels can be perfused by a pulsatile pump. Thus, it is currently possible to provide excellent and in-depth training in microsurgical techniques, even when the number of live animals used is reduced to a minimum. With these new and innovative techniques, trainees are able to learn and prepare themselves for the clinical situation, with the sacrifice of considerably fewer laboratory animals than would have occurred previously.
    Alternatives to laboratory animals: ATLA 05/2008; 36(2):153-60. · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The so called 'sweat gland carcinoma' is a rare skin malignancy. The differentiation between apocrine and eccrine neoplasms remains difficult. Skin tumors of the axilla are often suspected to be metastasis of other neoplasms in particular breast cancer. A 71-year-old man presented with a morphea-like plaque of the right axilla which in punch biopsy was first suspected as metastasis of primary lobular breast carcinoma. After further clinical and laboratory work up including immunohistochemistry the original diagnosis of a breast cancer had to be changed to solid apocrine carcinoma of the skin. Wide excision with en-bloc axillary lymph node dissection was performed. Final tumor stage was pT2 N0 M0 (V0 L0). No adjuvant treatment was necessary, and there is no evidence of disease after 3 years. Solid apocrine carcinoma of the skin is a rare variant with apocrine differentiation. A survey of the stereotypical presentation of this lesion and a comparison with lobular breast carcinoma and other types of apocrine carcinoma of the skin is given.
    Journal of Cutaneous Pathology 04/2008; 35(3):332-6. · 1.77 Impact Factor
  • Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 01/2007; 119(5-6):149. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microsurgery is today an established technique in specialties such as plastic surgery, neurosurgery, and trauma surgery. However, specialized training is a prerequisite for mastering anastomosis of small-diameter vessels or coaptation of nerves in the operating room. The training should be as realistic as possible and thus, laboratory animals such as the rat are preferably used as a substitute. In an attempt to minimize the use of living animals without jeopardizing a realistic training setting, we developed a pulsatile perfused porcine coronary artery model for microsurgical education. The training model consists of a membrane pump that generates a pulsatile flow within a coronary artery of a porcine heart. The pump is commercially available with a dimension of approximately 130 x 100 x 60 mm and a weight of 190 g. The pump is energized by 220 B and the motor is run on a transformed power of approximately 12 V (range, 1.5-12 V). Different fluids from simple saline solution to theoretically whole blood can be used for perfusion. The membrane pump proved to be very reliable during microvascular training because of its convenient size and wide range of feed rate providing a very realistic training setting. A maximum fluid output of 850 mL/min can be achieved. The pump has a high acceptance in microsurgical trainees evaluated by questionnaires during several microsurgical courses. The pulsatile perfused porcine coronary artery system for microsurgical training enables the trainee to work under the most realistic training settings. It proved to be a valuable tool during microsurgical education, reducing the costs and sparing living laboratory animals. Thus, we can recommend this system to anyone who is involved in training and teaching microsurgical skills.
    Annals of Plastic Surgery 09/2006; 57(2):213-6. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Georg M Huemer, Harald Schoffl, Karin M Dunst
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    ABSTRACT: Without Abstract
    Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 07/2006; 118(11-12):321. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) has become a valuable and safe option in the treatment of varicose veins. Although long-term results are lacking, most patients seem to benefit in the short-term from EVLT. Reported postoperative complications are limited, consisting usually of pain, ecchymosis, induration, phlebitis, or spot skin burn injuries. The most feared complication is an extension of the saphenous thrombus into the femoral vein, with possible pulmonary embolism. Here we report a septic thrombophlebitis after EVLT resulting in a phlegmonous infection of the whole leg that was treated by surgical drainage. Aggressive local therapy and antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and eventual satisfactory healing.
    Journal of Vascular Surgery 06/2006; 43(5):1056-8. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adolf Jarisch was born on the 15th of February 1850 in the city of Vienna, where he also studied medicine. He soon pursued a career in dermatology and venereology and, thus, joined the clinic of von Hebra, one of the founders of the famous new Vienna School of Medicine. After temporarily replacing von Hebra, Jarisch became the chief of the Department of Dermatology at the University of Innsbruck (1887). Although Adolf Jarisch was appointed chief of the dermatologic department at the University of Graz 5 years later (1892), his biggest dream, to become successor of his former teacher Ferdinand von Hebra and head the dermatological department of the Wiener Allgemeines Krankenhaus (Vienna General Hospital) did not come true. Although Adolf Jarisch is mainly known for his observations on skin reactions and a profound worsening of symptoms in syphilitic patients immediately following treatment with mercury (Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction), he authored more than 25 scientific articles and wrote a book, "Hautkrankheiten", which was considered as the most important in German-speaking literature at the beginning of the twentieth century. The purpose of this historical article is to discuss Jarisch's achievements in the field of dermatology based on a detailed analysis of his scientific work.
    Archives for Dermatological Research 04/2006; 297(9):383-8. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • Orthopedics 03/2006; 29(2):163-4. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Without Abstract
    European Surgery 01/2006; 38(3):222-223. · 0.15 Impact Factor
  • Karin Maria Dunst, Clemens Molnar, Monika Lechleitner
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    ABSTRACT: Without Abstract
    Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 11/2005; 117(19-20):684. · 0.81 Impact Factor
  • K M Dunst, G M Huemer, B G Zelger
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    ABSTRACT: Cutaneous mastocytosis (CM) or urticaria pigmentosa is characterized by abnormal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells. Clinically, CM usually presents as symmetrically distributed red-brown macules or papules that develop weals, erythema and often pruritus on stroking (Darier's sign). The histological hallmark of the disease is an increase in oval to spindle-shaped mast cells in the dermis located around blood vessels and skin appendages. We describe three patients with a new clinicopathological type of CM, which clinically mimics a histiocytic disorder and histologically mimics leucocytoclastic vasculitis (LV). Three infants (two boys and one girl) developed generalized reddish-yellow-brown macules of 3-10 cm with occasional scaling and crusting on the trunk and extremities without further symptoms or organ involvement except variable itching. Histology revealed diffuse and dense dermal infiltrates of eosinophils, neutrophils and nuclear debris with perivascular accentuation, imitating LV. This infiltrate masked large epithelioid cells, positive for macrophage markers, which by special histochemical stains for metachromatic granules turned out to be mast cells. This is the first report of this new variant of CM, which may cause considerable diagnostic difficulties both clinically and histopathologically.
    British Journal of Dermatology 10/2005; 153(3):642-6. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic cardiac hepatopathy is a common entity in patients evaluated for heart transplantation (HTX). Hepatic injury is caused by severe heart failure resulting from prolonged recurrent congestion and/or impaired arterial perfusion. No data are available on the reversibility of cardiac hepatopathy in patients undergoing HTX. Data of 56 consecutive adult patients undergoing HTX during 2000-02 at the University Hospital of Innsbruck were analysed retrospectively. The following parameters were evaluated at the time of listing and 3, 6 and 12 months after HTX. Plasma levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total plasma protein. When listed for HTX, only 12% of all patients analysed had physiological values throughout the seven laboratory parameters assessed. Elevated levels of gamma-GT, AP, bilirubin, AST, ALT, LDH and total plasma protein were detected in 66.6%, 29%, 50%, 16.7%, 10%, 40% and 18% of all patients respectively. Accordingly, median plasma levels of gamma-GT, bilirubin and LDH were elevated, whereas the mean plasma level of AP was at the upper normal range. In contrast, median plasma level of AST and mean plasma levels of ALT and total plasma protein were within the normal range: gamma-GT (median, 109.0; range, 634.0 U/l; n = 36), AP (mean, 120.2 +/- 78.9 U/l; n = 29), bilirubin (median, 1.3; range, 16.1 mg/dl; n = 32), LDH (median, 226.0; range, 2355.0 U/l; n = 33), AST (median, 29.0; range, 145.0 U/l; n = 36), ALT (mean, 28.3 +/- 20.8 U/l; n = 36) and total plasma protein (mean, 7.2 +/- 1.1 g/dl; n = 25). Within 3 months after HTX, elevated parameters except LDH significantly ameliorated: gamma-GT (median, 59.0; range, 1160.0 U/l; P = 0.011), AP (92.2 +/- 75.2 U/l; P = 0.016), bilirubin (median, 0.9; range, 8.1 mg/dl; P = 0.004), LDH slightly increased (median, 281.0; range, 543.0 U/l; P = 0.039), but there was a delayed improvement of this parameter after 6 and 12 months post-HTX. End-stage heart failure is characterized by a cholestatic liver enzyme profile with elevated plasma levels of gamma-GT and bilirubin. These parameters significantly improve within 3 months after HTX. Therefore, chronic cardiac hepatopathy seems to be a benign, potentially reversible disease.
    Transplant International 07/2005; 18(6):697-702. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diarrhea following solid organ transplantation is a common side effect of some immunosuppressive agents but can also be caused by many pathogens. An outbreak of rotavirus (RV) enteritis presenting with severe diarrhea in four solid organ recipients was analyzed. The first case was diagnosed in a 6-month-old liver recipient who was prehospitalized on a pediatric ward. Within 1 month, three adult patients (two liver, one renal recipient) presented with enteritis. During diarrhea a significant rise in tacrolimus levels was observed. One patient developed toxic megacolon with ulcerative colitis. Infections were self-limiting but led to secondary infectious complications and prolonged hospitalization. This is the first reported outbreak of RV enteritis in a multiorgan transplant unit involving adult patients. Although no fingerprinting or subtyping of the virus was performed we assume the child was the primary source. In transplant recipients presenting with diarrhea RV infection should be considered.
    Transplant International 05/2005; 18(4):470-4. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation has become important in treating end-stage lung disease; however, bronchial complications are common. Lack of bronchial arterial circulation, ischemic time, and acute rejection episodes may damage the bronchial wall. In this study, we analyzed factors that may hamper bronchial airway healing, requiring intervention after lung transplantation. We collected data from a consecutive series of 81 transplantations performed between 1993 and 2002 and evaluated recipients for bronchial complications. In 30 single and 51 sequential bilateral lung transplantations, a total of 132 anastomoses were performed. Four patients (3 bilateral and 1 single lung transplant recipients who died within the first 14 post-operative days were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 125 lung grafts remained for statistical analysis of factors influencing bronchial complications. Peri-operative mortality was 8.9%. Eleven patients (14.7%) experienced severe bronchial complications in 16 of 125 evaluated bronchial anastomoses (12.8%) and required surgical treatment or bronchoscopic interventional therapy. In a multivariate logistic regression model, severe reperfusion edema (adjusted odds ratio, 8.3; p = 0.002) and rejection episode within the 1st post-operative month (adjusted odds ratio, 4.1; p = 0.036) were associated with bronchial complications. Using the univariate model, we found that factors such as interleukin-2-antibody induction therapy, immunosuppression, or bronchial anastomotic technique had significant influence on bronchial healing, whereas we could not confirm this when using multivariate anasysis. Preventing reperfusion edema with optimized lung preservation and with early and aggressive medical treatment or mechanical hemodynamical support (e.g., veno-arterial extra corporal membrane oxygenation are necessary to avoid prolonged ventilation dependence, which may result in bronchial complications. Furthermore, avoiding early rejection episodes promotes uncomplicated bronchial healing.
    The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation 04/2005; 24(3):275-81. · 5.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a cross-sectional analysis, the three top ranking dermatology journals ( Archives of Dermatology , British Journal of Dermatology , and the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ) were evaluated for their scientific content, the characteristics of their authors, and funding aspects in 2002. A flood of scientific papers are published each year covering a broad variety of dermatologic topics. Aside from the actual content, a scientific article provides information about the number of authors, their nationality and affiliations, and, with some limitation, about previous presentations and funding. The present study analyzes this situation in dermatology by evaluating the content in the three top dermatologic journals.
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 03/2005; 52(2):355-9. · 4.91 Impact Factor
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    Emerging infectious diseases 03/2005; 11(2):352-4. · 5.99 Impact Factor
  • Georg M Huemer, Karin M Dunst
    New England Journal of Medicine 03/2005; 352(6):e5. · 54.42 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

211 Citations
135.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Allgemeines Krankenhaus Linz
      Linz, Upper Austria, Austria
  • 2004–2009
    • Medizinische Universität Innsbruck
      • • Universitätsklinik für Visceral-, Transplantations- und Thoraxchirurgie
      • • Universitätsklinik für Herzchirurgie
      Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria
    • IST Austria
      Klosterneuberg, Lower Austria, Austria
  • 2003–2008
    • University of Innsbruck
      • • Institut für Psychologie
      • • Institute of Biochemistry
      Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria