Pernille Bøyesen

University of Copenhagen Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark

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Publications (36)177.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether MRI features predict radiographic progression including erosive evolution in patients from the Oslo hand osteoarthritis (OA) cohort, which is the first longitudinal hand OA study with available MRI.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of different MRI unit field strengths, coil types and image resolutions on the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) of bone marrow oedema (BME) and image quality.Methods. Forty-one patients and 12 healthy controls participated in this cross-sectional study. Coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted sequences were obtained at 0.23, 0.6, 1.5 and 3T using flex coils (Flex). Additional STIR sequences were obtained with phased array extremity coils (Extr) (at 0.6 and 1.5T) and higher resolution (at 1.5T). In otal, 338 STIR image sets were anonymized and scored according to RAMRIS and parameters of image quality were measured.Results. The BME sum scores were similar overall when comparing the different MRI units, coil types and voxel sizes, yet significantly higher at the higher resolution of 1.5T Extr compared with 0.23T Flex (P = 0.004), 0.6T Flex (P = 0.03), 1.5T Flex (P = 0.05) and 3T Flex (P = 0.001). Mean differences were relatively minor (0-3.5). Intrareader reliability of BME scores was high [intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.90 for all except 0.23T (0.81) and percentage exact agreement 81-88%]. The smallest detectable difference was better at 0.6, 1.5 and 3T (9-29% of maximum value) than at 0.23T (40%). Image quality was lowest at 0.23T.Conclusion. No major, consistent differences were found between BME scores using STIR sequences obtained at different field strengths, coil types and image resolutions, suggesting that these are equally suited for assessment of BME in RA. However, parameters of image quality and intrareader reliability (favouring 0.6, 1.5 and 3T) should be considered when selecting the MRI acquisition strategy.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 03/2014; · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders, frequently affecting the hands. In the last decade there has been increased awareness concerning this disorder because of its clinical burden. Unfortunately, only limited treatments for symptom alleviation are available, and no effective treatment for disease modification exists. The lack of treatment is due not only to a lack of understanding of the disease process, but also to poor outcome measures to assess the condition. The OMERACT Hand OA Special Interest Group (SIG) has started to develop a core set of outcome measures for hand OA clinical trials, observational studies, and clinical record keeping. At OMERACT 11, results from a Delphi exercise were presented, and a preliminary set of core domains was discussed. The group attempted to adopt the new OMERACT Filter 2.0 in the process, and literature overviews of conventional radiographs, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging as outcome measures in hand OA were presented. Discussions that followed highlighted further suggestions for core domains, the heterogeneity of hand OA, and future research priorities.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 01/2014; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. In a comparative conventional MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, CT and radiography study, the authors aimed to monitor whether inflammation is reduced or even eliminated and damage halted in PsA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy.Methods. A 48-week prospective open-label investigator-initiated trial of 41 biologic-naive patients treated with 40 mg adalimumab every other week. Hand CT, MRI (according to the PsA MRI scoring system method) and radiography (Sharp-van der Heijde method) were obtained at weeks 0, 6 (only MRI), 24 and 48. Clinical response was assessed by the PsA Response Criteria (PsARC).Results. In the 23 PsARC responders at week 48, significant decreases from baseline in MRI synovitis (mean -2.0, P < 0.05), bone marrow oedema (BMO) (-1.3, P < 0.05), flexor tenosynovitis (-2.1, P < 0.05) and total inflammation (-6.0, P < 0.005) were observed. However, MRI signs of inflammation remained present (week 48 total inflammation score median = 9). Several DCE-MRI parameters also decreased (P < 0.05) and were correlated (ρ = 0.62) with conventional MRI total inflammation score. No statistically significant changes in bone erosion or proliferation scores were observed. With CT as the standard reference for detecting bone erosions/proliferations, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100%/40%, 83%/93% and 84%/86%, respectively, for MRI, whereas corresponding values for radiography were 17%/26%, 98%/96%, and 93%/87%, respectively. Erosive progression as assessed by CT was found in 6 of 480 joints and baseline BMO was predictive (relative risk 10, 95% CI 2.1, 49).Conclusion. MRI signs of inflammation decrease, but do not disappear, during anti-TNF-α therapy. No overall changes in bone erosions or proliferations were observed. On joint-level baseline MRI, BMO was related to subsequent erosive progression detected by CT.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01465438.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 12/2013; · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To investigate the pattern and development of bone erosion and proliferation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) during treatment with adalimumab, using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) and conventional radiography. Method: Forty-one biologic-naïve PsA patients were initiated with adalimumab 40 mg subcutaneously every other week. CT and radiography of the 2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints were conducted at baseline (n = 41) and after 24 weeks (n = 32). Changes in bone erosion and proliferation are described and the imaging modalities compared. Results: Ninety percent of bone erosions detected by CT were located in the metacarpal heads, and most frequently in the 2nd-3rd MCP joints. Radial (37%) and ulnar (31%) surfaces were more frequently eroded than dorsal (10%) and palmar (22%) sites. Using CT, bone proliferations were located primarily on the sides of the distal part of the DIP joints (43% of all proliferations), but also proximally in DIP (17%) and MCP joints (27%). For bone erosions and proliferations, respectively, radiography showed a low sensitivity (17% and 26%), but a high specificity (98% and 95%) and accuracy (93% and 87%), with CT as the gold standard reference. Neither CT nor radiography revealed statistically significant changes in bone erosion or proliferation scores between baseline and follow-up. Conclusions: Patterns of bone erosion and proliferation in PsA hands were revealed in more detail by CT than by radiography. No overall progression or repair could be detected during adalimumab treatment with either of the methods.
    Scandinavian journal of rheumatology 12/2013; · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected subclinical inflammation for subsequent radiographic progression in a longitudinal study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA), and to determine cutoffs for an MRI inflammatory activity acceptable state in RA in which radiographic progression rarely occurs. Patients with RA in clinical remission [28-joint Disease Activity Score-C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) < 2.6, n = 185] or LDA state (2.6 ≤ DAS28-CRP < 3.2, n = 69) with longitudinal MRI and radiographic data were included from 5 cohorts (4 international centers). MRI were assessed according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS). Statistical analyses included an underlying conditional logistic regression model stratified per cohort, with radiographic progression as dependent variable. A total of 254 patients were included in the multivariate analyses. At baseline, synovitis was observed in 95% and osteitis in 49% of patients. Radiographic progression was observed in 60 patients (24%). RAMRIS synovitis was the only independent predictive factor in multivariate analysis. ROC analysis identified a cutoff value for baseline RAMRIS synovitis score of 5 (maximum possible score 21). Rheumatoid factor (RF) status yielded a significant interaction with synovitis (p value = 0.044). RF-positive patients with a RAMRIS synovitis score of > 5 vs ≤ 5, had an OR of 4.4 (95% CI 1.72-11.4) for radiographic progression. High MRI synovitis score predicts radiographic progression in patients in clinical remission/LDA. A cutoff point for determining an MRI inflammatory activity acceptable state based on the RAMRIS synovitis score was established. Incorporating MRI in future remission criteria should be considered.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2013; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials. The breadth of pathology in the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score has been strengthened with further work on the development of a joint space narrowing score, and a series of exercises presented at OMERACT 11 demonstrated good reliability and construct validity for this assessment. Understanding the importance of residual inflammation after RA treatment remains a major focus of the group's work. Analyses were presented on defining the level of synovitis (using MRI scores of a single hand) that would predict absence of erosion progression. The development of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis MRI score has continued with substantial work presented on its iterative development, including pathology definition, scaling, and subsequent reliability of the score. Optimizing the role of MRI as a robust biomarker and surrogate outcome remains a priority for this group.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2013; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To test the intrareader and interreader reliability of assessment of joint space narrowing (JSN) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using the newly proposed OMERACT-RAMRIS JSN scoring method, and to compare JSN assessment on MRI, CT, and radiography. After calibration of readers, MRI and CT images of the wrist and second to fifth MCP joints from 14 patients with RA and 1 healthy control were assessed twice for JSN by 3 readers, blinded to clinical and imaging data. Radiographs were scored by the Sharp van der Heijde method. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and smallest detectable differences (SDD) were calculated, and the performance of various simplified scores was investigated. Both MRI and CT showed high intrareader (ICC ≥ 0.95) and interreader (ICC ≥ 0.94) reliability for total (wrist + MCP) assessment of JSN. Agreement was generally lower for MCP joints than for wrist joints, particularly for CT. Intrareader SDD for MCP/wrist/MCP + wrist were 1.2/6.1/6.4 JSN units for MRI, while 2.7/8.3/9.9 JSN units for CT. JSN on MRI and CT correlated moderately well with corresponding radiographic JSN scores (MCP 2-5: 0.49 and 0.56; wrist areas assessed by Sharp van der Heijde: 0.80 and 0.95), and high ICC between scores on MRI and CT were demonstrated (MCP: 0.94; wrist: 0.92; MCP + wrist: 0.92). The OMERACT-RAMRIS MRI JSN scoring system showed high intrareader and interreader reliability, and high correlation with CT scores of JSN. The suggested JSN score may, after further validation in longitudinal studies, become a useful tool in RA clinical trials.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2013; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop and test the interreader reliability of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Scoring System (HOAMRIS) for assessment of structural and inflammatory hand OA features in the interphalangeal joints. The HOAMRIS was developed through an iterative process. Selection of features and their scaling was agreed upon through consensus by members of the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force, using the Oslo Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) MRI Score system as a template. Two reliability exercises were performed, in which 6 and 4 readers participated, respectively. After the first exercise, an atlas was developed and used in the second exercise to facilitate reading. In each exercise, readers independently scored 8 MRI scans from the Oslo Hand OA cohort (coronal/axial short-tau inversion recovery and coronal/axial/sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed pre-/post-Gadolinium images). Interreader reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), percentage exact and close agreement (PEA/PCA). The preliminary OMERACT HOAMRIS included assessment of synovitis, erosive damage, cysts, osteophytes, cartilage space loss, malalignment, and bone marrow lesions (BML), of which all were scored on a 0-3 scale for normal, mild, moderate, and severe (increments of 0.5 for synovitis, erosive damage, and BML). In the first exercise, most features showed good to very good ICC values (0.64-0.94), except synovitis (0.34). In the second exercise using the atlas, the ICC values were > 0.74 for all MRI features, and the PEA/PCA values were higher than in the first exercise. A preliminary HOAMRIS with good to very good interreader reliability was developed. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess its sensitivity to change.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2013; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous longitudinal studies have shown no associations between increasing amount of radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA) and levels of hand pain/disability. In this longitudinal study, we aimed to study whether radiographic hand OA was related to pain/disability in cross-sectional and longitudinal settings focusing on joint-specific analyses. We included 190 patients (173 women, mean (standard deviation, SD) age 61.5 (5.7) years) from the Oslo hand OA cohort, of whom 112 had 7-year follow-up data. Finger joints were scored for radiographic OA according to the Kellgren-Lawrence scale and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) atlas. Pain and function were assessed by clinical examination (joint tenderness), grip strength and the Australian/Canadian (AUSCAN) questionnaire. Associations between radiographic hand OA and tenderness in the same joint were examined by logistic regression analyses with Generalized Estimating Equations, whereas associations between overall amount of radiographic OA and hand pain/disability were assessed by linear regression (adjusted for age and sex). A dose-dependent association was found between the severity of radiographic OA and tenderness in the same joint. Joints that progressed into severe radiographic OA during follow-up had the highest odds of developing tenderness (OR = 11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0-33). Incident erosions seemed to be the most important individual feature associated with incident tenderness (OR = 6.2, 95% CI 3.2-12). Weak associations were found between the amount of radiographic hand OA and overall hand pain/disability. Radiographic hand OA is associated with tenderness in the same joint, and erosive development strongly predicts future joint tenderness independent of other radiographic features.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 09/2013; 21(9):1191-8. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice.METHODS: Conventional radiographs (x-rays) of hands and wrists were obtained ∼2 years before start (prebaseline), at baseline and ∼2 years after start (follow-up) of TNF-I. Clinical data were obtained from the DANBIO registry and the patient files. x-Rays were scored blinded to chronology according to the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Annual radiographic progression rates during the DMARD (prebaseline to baseline x-ray) and TNF-I (baseline to follow-up x-ray) periods were calculated.RESULTS: 517 RA patients (76% women, 80% IgM rheumatoid factor positive, 65% anticyclic citrullinated peptide positive, 40% current smokers, age 54 years (range 21-86), median disease duration 5 years (range 0-57)) were included. Patients were treated with infliximab (61%), etanercept (15%) or adalimumab (24%). During the DMARD period 85% of patients received methotrexate, 51% sulphasalazine and 78% prednisolone. The median DMARD period was 733 days (IQR 484-1002) and the median TNF-I period was 562 days (IQR 405-766). The median radiographic progression rate decreased from 0.7 (IQR 0-2.9) total Sharp score units/year (dTSS) in the DMARD period to 0 (0-0.9) units/year in the TNF-I period (p<0.0001, Wilcoxon). Corresponding mean dTSS values were 2.1 (SD 3.7) versus 0.7 (SD 2.3) units/year (p<0.0001, paired t test). 305 patients progressed (dTSS >0) in the DMARD period compared with 158 patients in the TNF-I period (p<0.0001, χ(2)).CONCLUSION: This nationwide observational study of RA patients documented significantly reduced radiographic progression during TNF-I treatment compared with the previous period of DMARD treatment.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 04/2012; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reliability of ultrasonographic assessment of osteophytes and explore the concordance of osteophytes detected by ultrasound, MRI, conventional radiography (CR) and clinical joint examination in patients with hand osteoarthritis (HOA).METHODS: The study included 127 HOA patients (116 women, mean age 68.6 years (SD 5.8)) with ultrasound, CR and clinical examination of both hands and MRI of dominant hand. Osteophytes were assessed by all imaging modalities on 0-3 scales, whereas clinical bony enlargement was assessed as absent/present. An ultrasound atlas of ostephytes was developed, and the intra and inter-reader reliability of scoring ultrasound osteophytes on still images using the atlas as reference was examined. The reliability for ultrasound readings was examined with κ and percentage exact agreement (PEA) and percentage close agreement (PCA), and the sensitivity, specificity and PEA/PCA of ultrasound was calculated in comparison with MRI, CR and clinical examination.RESULTS: Ultrasound had high sensitivity (0.83) and specificity (0.75) in detecting osteophytes compared with MRI, with excellent PCA (96.1%). Moderate/large osteophytes (grade 2-3) were demonstrated more often by ultrasound (n=401) than by MRI (n=288) in 851 interphalangeal joints. Ultrasound detected more osteophytes (53.2%) than CR (30.0%) and clinical examination (36.9%). Intra and inter-reader reliability of ultrasound was excellent (PEA >88%, PCA 100% and weighted kappa >0.91).CONCLUSION: Ultrasound can reliably assess osteophytes in patients with HOA. Good agreement was found between osteophytes detected by ultrasound and MRI, while ultrasound was more sensitive than CR and clinical examination, which could be due to a multiplanar joint demonstration by ultrasound.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 04/2012; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the construct validity of MRI in the detection of structural hand osteoarthritis features with conventional radiography (CR) as reference and explore the association between radiographic severity and MRI-defined pathology. 106 hand osteoarthritis patients (97 women, mean age 68.9 years (SD 5.6)) had 1.0T contrast-enhanced MRI and CR of the dominant hand. The 2nd-5th interphalangeal joints were scored according to the preliminary Oslo hand osteoarthritis MRI score and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale and Osteoarthritis Research Society International atlas for radiographs. The authors compared the number of joints with structural features by MRI and CR (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) and examined concordance at the individual joint level. The OR of MRI features in joints with doubtful (KL grade 1), mild (2) and moderate/severe (≥3) radiographic osteoarthritis was estimated by generalised estimating equations (KL grade 0 as reference). MRI detected approximately twice as many joints with erosions and osteophytes compared with CR (p<0.001), but identification of joint space narrowing, cysts and malalignment was similar. The sensitivity of MRI was very high for osteophytes (1.00) and erosions (0.95), while specificity was lower (0.22 and 0.63). The prevalence of most MRI features increased with radiographic severity, but synovitis was more frequent in joints with mild osteoarthritis (OR2.1, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.2) than in moderate/severe osteoarthritis (OR1.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.2). MRI detected more osteophytes and erosions than CR, suggesting that erosive osteoarthritis may be more common than indicated by CR. Synovitis was most common in mild osteoarthritis. Whether this is due to burn-out of inflammation in late disease must be investigated further.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 03/2012; 71(3):345-50. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    Ida K Haugen, Pernille Bøyesen
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    ABSTRACT: Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is very frequent in middle-aged and older women and men in the general population. Currently, owing to high feasibility and low costs, conventional radiography (CR) is the method of choice for evaluation of hand OA. CR provides a two-dimensional picture of bony changes, such as osteophytes, erosions, cysts, and sclerosis, and joint space narrowing as an indirect measure of cartilage loss. There are several standardized scoring methods for evaluation of radiographic hand OA. The scales have shown similar reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change, and no conclusion about the preferred instrument has been drawn. Patients with hand OA may experience pain, stiffness, and physical disability, but the associations between radiographic findings and clinical symptoms are weak to moderate and vary across studies. OA is, indeed, recognized to involve the whole joint, and modern imaging techniques such as ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be valuable tools for better evaluation of hand OA. Standardized scoring methods have been proposed for both modalities. Several studies have examined the validity of US features in hand OA, whereas knowledge of the validity of MRI is more limited. However, both synovitis (detected by either US or MRI) and MRI-defined bone marrow lesions have been associated with pain, indicating that treatment of inflammation is important for pain management in hand OA. Both US and MRI have shown better sensitivity than CR in detection of erosions, and this may indicate that erosive hand OA may be more common than previously thought.
    Arthritis research & therapy 12/2011; 13(6):248. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore associations between MRI features and measures of pain and physical function in hand osteoarthritis (OA). Eighty-five patients (77 women) with mean (SD) age of 68.8 (5.6) years underwent contrast-enhanced MRI of the interphalangeal joints (dominant hand) and clinical joint assessment. One investigator read the MRIs for presence/severity of osteophytes, joint space narrowing, erosions, bone attrition, cysts, malalignment, synovitis, flexor tenosynovitis, bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and ligament discontinuity according to the proposed Oslo hand OA MRI score. Pain and physical function were assessed by joint palpation (tenderness yes/no), self-reported questionnaires (Australian/Canadian (AUSCAN) hand index, Functional Index of hand osteoarthritis (FIHOA), Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale-2 (AIMS-2) hand/finger) and grip strength. Logistic regression with generalised estimating equations was used to explore associations between the presence of MRI features and joint tenderness, and linear regression for associations between the burden of MRI abnormalities and patient-reported outcomes and grip strength (adjusted for age and sex). MRI features with p<0.25 were introduced into a multivariate model. The final model included features with p≤0.10 (backward selection). MRI-defined moderate/severe synovitis (OR=2.4; p<0.001), BMLs (OR=1.5; p=0.06), erosions (OR=1.4; p=0.05), attrition (OR=2.5; p<0.001) and osteophytes (OR=1.4; p=0.10) were associated with joint tenderness independently of each other (final model adjusted for age and sex). The sum score of MRI-defined attrition was associated with FIHOA (B=0.58; p=0.005), while the sum score of osteophytes was associated with grip strength (B=-0.39; p<0.001). No significant associations were found with AUSCAN pain/physical function or AIMS-2 hand/finger subscales. MRI-defined synovitis, BMLs, erosions and attrition were associated with joint tenderness. Synovitis and BMLs may be targets for therapeutic interventions in hand OA.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 11/2011; 71(6):899-904. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method of assessment of joint space narrowing (JSN) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Phase A: JSN was scored 0-4 on MR images of 5 RA patients and 3 controls at 15 wrist sites and 2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints by 8 readers (7 once, one twice), using a preliminary scoring system. Phase B: Image review, discussion, and consensus on JSN definition, and revised scoring system. Phase C: MR images of 15 RA patients and 4 controls were scored using revised system by 5 readers (4 once, one twice), and results compared with radiographs [Sharp-van der Heijde (SvdH) method]. Phase A: Intraobserver agreement: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.99; smallest detectable difference (SDD, for mean of readings) = 2.8 JSN units (4.9% of observed maximal score). Interobserver agreement: ICC = 0.93; SDD = 6.4 JSN units (9.9%). Phase B: Agreement was reached on JSN definition (reduced joint space width compared to normal, as assessed in a slice perpendicular to the joint surface), and revised scoring system (0-4 at 17 wrist sites and 2nd-5th MCP; 0: none; 1: 1-33%; 2: 34-66%; 3: 67-99%; 4: ankylosis). Phase C: Intraobserver agreement: ICC = 0.90; SDD = 6.8 JSN units (11.0%). Interobserver agreement: ICC = 0.92 and SDD = 6.2 JSN units (8.7%). The correlation (ICC) with the SvdH radiographic JSN score of the wrist/hand was 0.77. Simplified approaches evaluating fewer joint spaces demonstrated similar reliability and correlation with radiographic scores. An MRI scoring system of JSN in RA wrist and MCP joints was developed and showed construct validity and good intra- and interreader agreements. The system may, after further validation in longitudinal data sets, be useful as an outcome measure in RA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2011; 38(9):2045-50. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method as a potential RAMRIS addendum, although responsiveness will need to be evaluated. One of the strengths of MRI is the ability to detect subclinical synovitis, so the group worked on obtaining low disease activity/clinical remission datasets from a number of international centers and presented cross-sectional findings. Subsequent longitudinal evaluation of this unique resource will be a major continuing focus for the group.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2011; 38(9):2031-3. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), radiographic progression may occur despite clinical remission. This may be explained by subclinical inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a greater sensitivity than clinical examination and radiography for assessing disease activity. Our objective was to determine the MRI characteristics of RA patients in clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA) state. Databases from 6 cohorts were collected from 5 international centers. RA patients in clinical remission according to Disease Activity Score28-C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP < 2.6; n = 213) or LDA-state (2.6 ≤ DAS28-CRP < 3.2; n = 81) with available MRI data were included. MRI were assessed according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS). Patient characteristics: 70% women, median age 55 (interquartile range, IQR 43-63) years, disease duration 2.3 (IQR 0.7-5.1) years, DAS28-CRP 2.2 (IQR 1.8-2.6), Simplified Disease Activity Index, SDAI, 3.9 (IQR 1.9-6.5), Clinical Disease Activity Index, CDAI, 3.1 (IQR 1.5- 5.8), rheumatoid factor/anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide positivity 57%/54%, presence of radiographic erosions: 66%. Wrist and metacarpophalangeal MRI (MCP-MRI) data were available for 287 and 241 patients, respectively. MRI inflammatory activity in wrist and/or MCP joints was observed in the majority [synovitis: 95%, bone edema (osteitis): 35%] of patients. The median (IQR) RAMRIS score was 6 (3-9) for synovitis and 0 (0-2) for osteitis. Synovitis and osteitis were not less frequent in DAS28 clinical remission (synovitis/osteitis 96%/35%) than LDA (91/36). A trend towards lower frequencies of osteitis in patients in SDAI and CDAI remission was observed. Subclinical inflammation was identified by MRI in the majority of RA patients in clinical remission or LDA state. This may explain structural progression in such patients. Further work is required to understand the place of modern imaging in future remission criteria.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2011; 38(9):2039-44. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this multireader exercise was to assess the reliability and sensitivity to change of the psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (PsAMRIS) in PsA patients followed for 1 year. MRI was acquired from 12 patients with PsA before initiation of treatment and after 12 months. MR images were scored according to PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone marrow edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation) under standardized conditions, in unknown chronological order. Intraobserver/interobserver reliability was examined by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and sensitivity to change by standardized response means (SRM). The interobserver reliability of PsAMRIS was high for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, and bone edema status and change scores (interobserver ICC 0.87-0.97). The intraobserver reliability was moderate to high (ICC 0.60-0.98) for status and change scores, except for change in periarticular inflammation (ICC 0.33). PsAMRIS sensitivity to change was moderate for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and periarticular inflammation (SRM 0.5-0.8), while poor (SRM 0.1-0.3) for bone marrow edema, erosion, and bone proliferation. Rare occurrence and minimal change contributed to poor SRM and change-score ICC for bone parameters. This multireader exercise, performed under standardized conditions, confirmed PsAMRIS to have high interobserver and intraobserver reliability for hand PsA. Measures of inflammation were sensitive to change, implying that PsAMRIS may be a valuable tool for monitoring change in inflammation during PsA clinical trials.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2011; 38(9):2034-8. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 04/2011; 70(11):2049-50. · 8.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

369 Citations
177.41 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Copenhagen Herlev Hospital
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2008–2013
    • Diakonhjemmet Hospital (Norway)
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo County, Norway
  • 2011
    • Hôpital La Pitié Salpêtrière (Groupe Hospitalier "La Pitié Salpêtrière - Charles Foix")
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Rigshospitalet
      • Department of Rheumatology
      Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark
    • VU University Medical Center
      • Department of Rheumatology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2009–2011
    • University of Leeds
      • Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine (LIMM)
      Leeds, England, United Kingdom
    • Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre
      Hvidovre, Capital Region, Denmark