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Publications (7)53.47 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an isoprenylated quinone that is essential for cellular respiration and is synthesized in mitochondria by the combined action of at least nine proteins (COQ1-9). Although most COQ proteins are known to catalyze modifications to CoQ precursors, the biochemical role of COQ9 remains unclear. Here, we report that a disease-related COQ9 mutation leads to extensive disruption of the CoQ protein biosynthetic complex in a mouse model, and that COQ9 specifically interacts with COQ7 through a series of conserved residues. Toward understanding how COQ9 can perform these functions, we solved the crystal structure of Homo sapiens COQ9 at 2.4 Å. Unexpectedly, our structure reveals that COQ9 has structural homology to the TFR family of bacterial transcriptional regulators, but that it adopts an atypical TFR dimer orientation and is not predicted to bind DNA. Our structure also reveals a lipid-binding site, and mass spectrometry-based analyses of purified COQ9 demonstrate that it associates with multiple lipid species, including CoQ itself. The conserved COQ9 residues necessary for its interaction with COQ7 comprise a surface patch around the lipid-binding site, suggesting that COQ9 might serve to present its bound lipid to COQ7. Collectively, our data define COQ9 as the first, to our knowledge, mammalian TFR structural homolog and suggest that its lipid-binding capacity and association with COQ7 are key features for enabling CoQ biosynthesis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2014; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytochrome c maturation protein E, CcmE, plays an integral role in the transfer of heme to apocytochrome c in many prokaryotes and some mitochondria. A novel subclass featuring a heme-binding cysteine has been identified in archaea and some bacteria. Here we describe the solution NMR structure, backbone dynamics, and heme binding properties of the soluble C-terminal domain of Desulfovibrio vulgaris CcmE, dvCcmE'. The structure adopts a conserved β-barrel OB fold followed by an unstructured C-terminal tail encompassing the CxxxY heme-binding motif. Heme binding analyses of wild-type and mutant dvCcmE' demonstrate the absolute requirement of residue C127 for noncovalent heme binding in vitro.
    Biochemistry 04/2012; 51(18):3705-7. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Protein domain family YabP (PF07873) is a family of small protein domains that are conserved in a wide range of bacteria and involved in spore coat assembly during the process of sporulation. The 62-residue fragment of Dsy0195 from Desulfitobacterium hafniense, which belongs to the YabP family, exists as a homodimer in solution under the conditions used for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the Dsy0195 homodimer contains two identical 62-residue monomeric subunits, each consisting of five anti-parallel beta strands (β1, 23-29; β2, 31-38; β3, 41-46; β4, 49-59; β5, 69-80). The tertiary structure of the Dsy0195 monomer adopts a cylindrical fold composed of two beta sheets. The two monomer subunits fold into a homodimer about a single C2 symmetry axis, with the interface composed of two anti-parallel beta strands, β1-β1' and β5b-β5b', where β5b refers to the C-terminal half of the bent β5 strand, without any domain swapping. Potential functional regions of the Dsy0195 structure were predicted based on conserved sequence analysis. The Dsy0195 structure reported here is the first representative structure from the YabP family.
    Journal of Structural and Functional Genomics 09/2011; 12(3):175-9.
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    ABSTRACT: In this chapter, we concentrate on the production of high-quality protein samples for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. In particular, we provide an in-depth description of recent advances in the production of NMR samples and their synergistic use with recent advancements in NMR hardware. We describe the protein production platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium and outline our high-throughput strategies for producing high-quality protein samples for NMR studies. Our strategy is based on the cloning, expression, and purification of 6×-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems and isotope enrichment in minimal media. We describe 96-well ligation-independent cloning and analytical expression systems, parallel preparative scale fermentation, and high-throughput purification protocols. The 6×-His affinity tag allows for a similar two-step purification procedure implemented in a parallel high-throughput fashion that routinely results in purity levels sufficient for NMR studies (>97% homogeneity). Using this platform, the protein open reading frames of over 17,500 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as over 28,000 constructs. Nearly 5000 of these proteins have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html), resulting in more than 950 new protein structures, including more than 400 NMR structures, deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pipeline has been effective in producing protein samples of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although this chapter describes our entire pipeline for producing isotope-enriched protein samples, it focuses on the major updates introduced during the last 5 years (Phase 2 of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative). Our advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening technologies are suitable for implementation in a large individual laboratory or by a small group of collaborating investigators for structural biology, functional proteomics, ligand screening, and structural genomics research.
    Methods in enzymology 01/2011; 493:21-60. · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the core Protein Production Platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) and outline the strategies used for producing high-quality protein samples. The platform is centered on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems. The 6X-His tag allows for similar purification procedures for most targets and implementation of high-throughput (HTP) parallel methods. In most cases, the 6X-His-tagged proteins are sufficiently purified (>97% homogeneity) using a HTP two-step purification protocol for most structural studies. Using this platform, the open reading frames of over 16,000 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as>26,000 constructs. Over the past 10 years, more than 16,000 of these expressed protein, and more than 4400 proteins (or domains) have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html). Using these samples, the NESG has deposited more than 900 new protein structures to the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The methods described here are effective in producing eukaryotic and prokaryotic protein samples in E. coli. This paper summarizes some of the updates made to the protein production pipeline in the last 5 years, corresponding to phase 2 of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI-2) project. The NESG Protein Production Platform is suitable for implementation in a large individual laboratory or by a small group of collaborating investigators. These advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening technologies are of broad value to the structural biology, functional proteomics, and structural genomics communities.
    Journal of Structural Biology 10/2010; 172(1):21-33. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a general need to develop more powerful and more robust methods for structural characterization of homodimers, homo-oligomers, and multiprotein complexes using solution-state NMR methods. In recent years, there has been increasing emphasis on integrating distinct and complementary methodologies for structure determination of multiprotein complexes. One approach not yet widely used is to obtain intermediate and long-range distance constraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PRE) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based techniques such as double electron electron resonance (DEER), which, when used together, can provide supplemental distance constraints spanning to 10-70 A. In this Communication, we describe integration of PRE and DEER data with conventional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods for structure determination of Dsy0195, a homodimer (62 amino acids per monomer) from Desulfitobacterium hafniense. Our results indicate that combination of conventional NMR restraints with only one or a few DEER distance constraints and a small number of PRE constraints is sufficient for the automatic NMR-based structure determination program CYANA to build a network of interchain nuclear Overhauser effect constraints that can be used to accurately define both the homodimer interface and the global homodimer structure. The use of DEER distances as a source of supplemental constraints as described here has virtually no upper molecular weight limit, and utilization of the PRE constraints is limited only by the ability to make accurate assignments of the protein amide proton and nitrogen chemical shifts.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 09/2010; 132(34):11910-3. · 11.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In selecting a method to produce a recombinant protein, a researcher is faced with a bewildering array of choices as to where to start. To facilitate decision-making, we describe a consensus 'what to try first' strategy based on our collective analysis of the expression and purification of over 10,000 different proteins. This review presents methods that could be applied at the outset of any project, a prioritized list of alternate strategies and a list of pitfalls that trip many new investigators.
    Nature Methods 03/2008; 5(2):135-46. · 23.57 Impact Factor