Wilma Vollebergh

Utrecht University, Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

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Publications (113)343.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Peer cliques form an important context for the social development of adolescents. Although clique members are often similar in social status, also within cliques, status differences exist. How differences in social status between clique members are related to behaviors of its individual members is rather unknown. This study examined to what extent the relationship of individual social status (i.e., perceived popularity) with aggression and prosocial behavior depends on the level of internal clique hierarchy. The sample consists of 2674 adolescents (49.8 % boys), with a mean age of 14.02. We focused specifically on physical and relational aggression, and practical and emotional support, because these behaviors have shown to be of great importance for social relationships and social standing among adolescents. The internal status hierarchy of cliques was based on the variation in individual social status between clique members (i.e., clique hierarchization) and the structure of status scores within a clique (pyramid shape, inverted pyramid, or equal distribution of social status scores) (i.e., clique status structure). The results showed that differences in aggressive and prosocial behaviors were particularly moderated by clique status structure: aggression was stronger related to individual social status in (girls') cliques where the clique status structure reflected an inverted pyramid with relatively more high status adolescents within the clique than low status peers, and prosocial behavior showed a significant relationship with individual social status, again predominantly in inverted pyramid structured (boys' and girls') cliques. Furthermore, these effects differed by types of gender cliques: the associations were found in same gender but not mixed-gender cliques. The findings stress the importance of taking into account internal clique characteristics when studying adolescent social status in relationship to aggression and prosociality.
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence 06/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10964-015-0310-4 · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, it has been suggested that impairments in executive functioning might be risk factors for the onset of alcohol use rather than a result of heavy alcohol use. In the present study, we examined whether two aspects of executive functioning, working memory and response inhibition, predicted the first alcoholic drink and first binge drinking episode in young adolescents using discrete survival analyses. Adolescents were selected from several Dutch secondary schools including both mainstream and special education (externalizing behavioral problems). Participants were 534 adolescents between 12 and 14 years at baseline. Executive functioning and alcohol use were assessed four times over a period of two years. Working memory uniquely predicted the onset of first drink (p=.01) and first binge drinking episode (p=.04) while response inhibition only uniquely predicted the initiating of the first drink (p=.01). These results suggest that the association of executive functioning and alcohol consumption found in former studies cannot simply be interpreted as an effect of alcohol consumption, as weaknesses in executive functioning, found in alcohol naïve adolescents, predict the initiating of (binge) drinking. Though, prolonged and heavy alcohol use might further weaken already existing deficiencies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 04/2015; 302. DOI:10.1016/j.dcn.2015.04.003 · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes trends and stability over time in health complaints in adolescents from 2002 to 2010 and investigates associations between health complaints, behavioural and social contextual factors at individual level and economic factors at macro-level. Comprising N = 510 876 11-, 13- and 15-year-old children and adolescents in Europe, North America and Israel, data came from three survey cycles of the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Age- and gender-adjusted trends in health complaints were examined in each country by means of linear regression. By using the country as the random effects variable, we tested to what extent individual and contextual variables were associated with health complaints. Significant associations are stronger for individual level determinants (e.g. being bullied, smoking) than for determinants at macro-level (e.g. GDP, Gini), as can be seen by the small effect sizes (less than 5% for different trends). Health complaints are fairly stable over time in most countries, and no clear international trend in health complaints can be observed between 2002 and 2010. The most prominent stable determinants were being female, being bullied, school pressure and smoking. Factors associated with health complaints are more related to the proximal environment than to distal macro-level factors. This points towards intensifying targeted interventions, (e.g. for bullying) and also targeting specific risk groups. The comparably small effect size at country-level indicates that country-level factors have an impact on health and should not be ignored. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.
    The European Journal of Public Health 04/2015; 25 Suppl 2(suppl 2):83-9. DOI:10.1093/eurpub/ckv033 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined trends in adolescent weekly alcohol use between 2002 and 2010 in 28 European and North American countries. Analyses were based on data from 11-, 13- and 15-year-old adolescents who participated in the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study in 2002, 2006 and 2010. Weekly alcohol use declined in 20 of 28 countries and in all geographic regions, from 12.1 to 6.1% in Anglo-Saxon countries, 11.4 to 7.8% in Western Europe, 9.3 to 4.1% in Northern Europe and 16.3 to 9.9% in Southern Europe. Even in Eastern Europe, where a stable trend was observed between 2002 and 2006, weekly alcohol use declined between 2006 and 2010 from 12.3 to 10.1%. The decline was evident in all gender and age subgroups. These consistent trends may be attributable to increased awareness of the harmful effects of alcohol for adolescent development and the implementation of associated prevention efforts, or changes in social norms and conditions. Although the declining trend was remarkably similar across countries, prevalence rates still differed considerably across countries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.
    The European Journal of Public Health 04/2015; 25(suppl 2-suppl 2):69-72. DOI:10.1093/eurpub/ckv031 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Health complaints are a good indicator of an individual's psychosocial health and well-being. Studies have shown that children and adolescents report health complaints which can cause significant individual burden. Using data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, this article describes trends in multiple recurrent health complaints (MHC) in 35 countries among N = 237 136 fifteen-year-olds from 1994 to 2010. MHC was defined as the presence of two or more health complaints at least once a week. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate trends across the five survey cycles for each country. Lowest prevalence throughout the period 1994-2010 was 16.9% in 1998 in Austria and highest in 2006 in Israel (54.7%). Overall, six different trend patterns could be identified: No linear or quadratic trend (9 countries), linear decrease (7 countries), linear increase (5 countries), U-shape (4 countries), inverted U-shape (6 countries) and unstable (4 countries). Trend analyses are valuable in providing hints about developments in populations as well as for benchmarking and evaluation purposes. The high variation in health complaints between the countries requires further investigation, but may also reflect the subjective nature of health complaints. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.
    The European Journal of Public Health 04/2015; 25 Suppl 2(suppl 2):24-7. DOI:10.1093/eurpub/ckv015 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: One explanation for the increase in delinquency in adolescence is that young people are trapped in the so-called maturity gap: the discrepancy between biological and social maturation, which motivates them to engage in delinquency as a temporary means to bridge this gap by emphasizing their maturity. In the current study, we investigated to what extent the discrepancy between pubertal status (i.e., biological maturation) and autonomy in decision making (i.e., social maturation) is related to conflict with parents, which in turn predicts increasing levels of delinquency as well as substance use.
    Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 01/2015; DOI:10.1177/0022427815582249 · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Several studies have shown that substance use levels among adolescents living in residential youth care are high. However, it is not clear to what extent adolescents initiate (heavy) substance during their stay and to what extent these rates are higher than would be expected based on their risk profile. Objective The aim of the present study is to examine the initiation of (heavy) substance use among adolescents in residential care and to compare these initiation rates with a reference group of non-institutionalized youth, while taking differences in the risk profiles between both groups into account. Methods Self-report questionnaires were completed by 241 adolescents in residential care (42 % boys; mean age 15.4 years) and 359 adolescents attending mainstream education (54 % boys; mean age 14.8 years). Results A substantial proportion of adolescents first started to use substances (heavily) during their stay in residential care (1 year incidence of daily tobacco use: 22.6 %, drunkenness: 38.5 %, cannabis use: 27.3 %, hard drug use: 9.4 %. Except for drunkenness, these rates were significantly higher compared to those in mainstream education. Adjusting the analyses for the risk profile showed that the elevated risk for hard drug use remained significant and substantial (IRR = 13.09). Conclusion A substantial proportion of adolescents started using substances (heavily) during their stay in residential care. Although rates may have been even higher if these adolescents were not placed in residential care, these findings highlight the need for effective preventive interventions and policies in these settings, especially with regard to the use of hard drugs.
    Child and Youth Care Forum 12/2014; DOI:10.1007/s10566-014-9294-6 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: TRAILS consists of a population cohort (N = 2230) and a clinical cohort (N = 543), both of which were followed from about age 11 years onwards. To date, the population cohort has been assessed five times over a period of 11 years, with retention rates ranging between 80% and 96%. The clinical cohort has been assessed four times over a period of 8 years, with retention rates ranging between 77% and 85%. Since the IJE published a cohort profile on the TRAILS in 2008, the participants have matured from adolescents into young adults. The focus shifted from parents and school to entry into the labour market and family formation, including offspring. Furthermore, psychiatric diagnostic interviews were administered, the database was linked to a Psychiatric Case Registry, and the availability of genome-wide SNP variations opened the door to genome-wide association studies regarding a wide range of (endo)phenotypes. With some delay, TRAILS data are available to researchers outside the TRAILS consortium without costs; access can be obtained by submitting a publication proposal (see www.trails.nl). © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.
    International Journal of Epidemiology 11/2014; DOI:10.1093/ije/dyu225 · 9.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the age of onset of substance use among 536 students with mild academic disabilities and 906 students without academic disabilities, and the extent to which emotional, conduct, and hyperactivity problems explain the differences between these two groups. Using discrete-time survival analysis, the results of this study showed that students with a mild academic disability were not at higher risk for the onset of daily smoking, and were at a significantly lower risk for the onset of weekly alcohol use and cannabis use. Though students with a mild academic disability displayed higher scores on conduct, emotional, and hyperactivity problems compared with their counterparts without an academic disability, this was not reflected in an increased risk for early onset substance use.
    Learning Disabilities Research and Practice 11/2014; 29(4). DOI:10.1111/ldrp.12041
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    ABSTRACT: Background Alcohol consumption levels and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms may serve as easily quantifiable markers for AUD relapse after remission and might help prevention workers identify at-risk individuals. We investigated the predictive value of alcohol consumption and AUD symptoms on relapse. Methods Data are from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2). We selected 506 people in ≥12-month DSM-5 AUD remission at baseline and assessed their status at 3-year follow-up. AUD symptoms and drinking patterns were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Time since remission was assessed retrospectively at baseline and ranged from 1 to 48 years. Predictors for relapse were examined using Cox regression analysis. Results Cumulative AUD relapse rate was 5.6% at 5 years, 9.1% at 10 years and 12.0% at 20 years. Relapse was predicted by both medium [15-28/22-42 drinks weekly for women/men] and high [≥29/43] past alcohol intake, 6+ lifetime AUD symptoms, ‘impaired control over use’, and at-risk [≥8/15] current intake. The risk of relapse was especially high when medium or high past intake or 6+ lifetime symptoms coincided with current at-risk drinking. Conclusions Only a minority of people in DSM-5 AUD remission relapsed, but the risk of relapse increased substantially with the presence of at least one of the risk factors. Moreover, at-risk current drinking coupled with other risk factors substantially increased the likelihood of relapse. Therefore, current drinking may provide an adequate reference point for relapse prevention.
    Drug and alcohol dependence 07/2014; 140. DOI:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.03.035 · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine cross-national changes in frequent adolescent cannabis use (40+ times consumed over life-time at age 15) over time and relate these trends to societal wealth, family affluence and gender. Data from three cycles (2002, 2006, 2010) of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study were used for cross-sectional and trend analyses of adolescent cannabis use. Representative surveys in 30 European and North American countries. A total of 160 606 15-year-old students. Respondents' life-time cannabis use, demographics, family affluence (FAS) and frequency of peer contacts were measured individually. Indicators of wealth (gross domestic product per capita, GDP) and perceived availability of cannabis were obtained from national public data bases. The frequency of life-time cannabis use decreased over time among adolescents in Europe and North America, particularly in western European countries and the United States (relative risk (RR) = 0.86: confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.93). This trend was not observed consistently in rapidly developing countries in eastern, central and southern Europe. Over time (2002-10), cannabis use became: (i) less characteristic of high GDP countries in contrast to lower GDP countries (RR = 0.74: CI 0.57-0.95); (ii) less characteristic of youth from high FAS families in contrast to youth from low FAS families (RR = 0.83: CI 0.72-0.96); and (iii) characterized by an increasing gender gap, i.e. consumption was higher among males (RR 1.26: CI 1.04-1.53). Perceived availability of cannabis and peer contacts remained strong predictors of frequent cannabis use. Among 30 European and North American countries, cannabis use appears to have 'trickled down' over time, with developing countries taking on the former (heavier) use pattern of richer countries, and less affluent youth taking on the former (heavier) use pattern of more affluent youth. Cannabis use continues to be more common among adolescent males than females.
    Addiction 11/2013; 109(2). DOI:10.1111/add.12373 · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study precursors (risk behavior, parental self-efficacy and parental awareness) of parental worries about their child’s behavior during adolescence (12–16 years) were examined. To this end, a new measure of parental worries about the child’s involvement in risk behavior is developed. Second, the effect of parental worries on adolescents’ alcohol use was tested and third whether ineffective alcohol-specific parenting mediated this effect. Longitudinal data including four waves from 703 parent–adolescent (M age = 12.2 years, SD = 0.5) dyads were used to conduct latent path and growth analysis in Mplus. Results showed that parental awareness, confidence in the effectiveness of their parenting practices and adolescent risk behavior at age 12 related to higher levels of worries in parents. Furthermore, more parental worries predicted an increase in adolescents’ drinking (slope), yet worries did not predict the amount of drinking at age 12 (intercept). In addition, parental worries predicted less restrictive rule setting and a lower quality of communication. This ineffective parenting accounted for the effect of parental worries on adolescent alcohol use. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that worries about risk behavior of their child uniquely contribute to higher drinking rates due to less effective parenting. These findings implicate that alcohol interventions should provide parents with effective leads to tackle the drinking behavior in their children (e.g. strict rules about alcohol).
    Cognitive Therapy and Research 10/2013; 37(5). DOI:10.1007/s10608-013-9545-0 · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adolescents who attend special education for behavioural problems (SEB) and adolescents who live in a residential youth care institution (RYC) are characterised by behavioural disorders and problematic family backgrounds and have an increased risk for substance use. Though it is likely that the high rates of substance use in SEB/RYC settings might be inherent to the risk profile of these adolescents, little is known about the actual role the risk profile has in explaining substance use. The present study examined the extent to which the elevated risk of substance use in SEB/RYC can be explained by high levels of individual, family, and peer risk indicators that are known to characterise their risk profile. Self-report questionnaires from 531 adolescents in RYC (50 % male; mean age 14.7) and 603 adolescents in SEB (81 % male; mean age 14.1) were compared with information from 1,905 adolescents attending special education for students with learning disabilities (SEL) (56 % male; mean age 14.1). Results show that adolescents in SEB/RYC reported higher levels of daily smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, cannabis and hard drug use, as well as greater prevalence of individual, family and peer factors. Though individual, family and in particular peer risk indicators all explain some of the variance in substance use, the differences between adolescents in SEB/RYC compared with SEL remained significant and substantial, with the exception of heavy alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that deviant peer affiliation, in particular, plays a role in explaining high substance use levels in SEB/RYC and those factors relevant to the residential settings and special education schools might also contribute to substance use in these high-risk groups.
    European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 09/2013; DOI:10.1007/s00787-013-0471-1 · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neighbourhood research hitherto has suggested that the neighbourhood in which youth grow up affects their educational achievement. However, the mechanisms though which the neighbourhood reaches these effects are still unclear. Family and individual characteristics seem important in explaining educational outcomes. We therefore propose two related mediating factors: parenting strategies and problematic behaviour. We test this mediation using the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children data for the Netherlands (N = 2683), in which adolescents are surveyed about their behaviour and relationships and, additionally, their parents are interviewed about their child and their parenting. These data are combined with data from Statistics Netherlands, which include neighbourhood-level information about real-estate value and ethnic variation of the neighbourhood population. The results show that the effects of the proportion of immigrant groups and the mean property values in the neighbourhood are unlikely to be mediated by parenting behaviours and problematic behaviour. The results also show that parents are likely to adapt their parenting behaviours to demographic neighbourhood characteristics. For example, parents in neighbourhoods with higher ethnic heterogeneity apply more protective parenting strategies.
    Environment and Planning A 09/2013; 45(9):2135-2153. DOI:10.1068/a45367 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although it seems intuitive that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) include excessive alcohol consumption (EAC), this notion is not well established. This study investigates to which degree EAC (defined as >14/21 drinks weekly for women/men and at least three 5+ drinking days per week) and AUD overlap and whether problematic alcohol use groups (EAC-only, AUD-only, and EAC + AUD) differ from each other and from nonproblematic alcohol users regarding sociodemographics, mental health problems, functioning, and service utilization. Data were derived from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2, a population-based study including 5,443 current drinkers (aged 18 to 64) interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Both DSM-IV AUDs and a proxy of DSM-5 AUD are considered. Of the current drinkers, 3.8% reported 12-month EAC. Twelve-month prevalence of DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD were 5.4 and 4.4%, respectively. Regarding DSM-IV, only 17.7% of subjects with AUD reported EAC and 25.3% of those with EAC had an AUD. Compared with nonproblematic alcohol users, the 3 groups of problematic alcohol use (EAC-only, AUD-only, and EAC + AUD) were more often associated with mental health problems, poorer functioning, and service utilization. There were few differences between EAC-only and AUD-only regarding these correlates. However, EAC + AUD had strongest associations with above-mentioned correlates compared with the other 3 groups. Compared with DSM-IV findings, DSM-5 AUDs had slightly larger overlap with EAC, but correlates were similarly associated with problematic alcohol use groups. Findings indicate limited overlap between EAC and AUD. Yet, both dimensions were similarly associated with other problems suggesting that both should be included in future epidemiological research to detect the total group of problematic alcohol users.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 08/2013; DOI:10.1111/acer.12248 · 3.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish the 3-year persistency rate of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and its predictors, and to examine drinking patterns of recently remitted persons. The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2) surveyed a nationally representative sample of adults (aged 18-64) at baseline (response=65.1%) and 3-year follow-up (response=80.4%). People with AUD at baseline, as defined by DSM-5 (n=198). AUD, drinking patterns and mental disorders were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Other predictors were assessed with an additional questionnaire. Predictors of persistency were examined with univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The AUD persistency rate was 29.5% (95% CI=20.0-39.0). In the multivariable model, the older (25-34 and 35-44) age groups had lower AUD persistency (odds ratio (OR)=0.05; p=.014 and OR=0.14; p=.028, respectively) than the youngest age group (18-24). A higher number of weekly drinks and a comorbid anxiety disorder predicted AUD persistency (OR=1.03; p=.043 and OR=4.56; p=.046, respectively). Furthermore, remission was associated with a reduction of 6 drinks per week between T0 and T1 . It should be noted however that 35.8% (95% CI=22.4-49.2) of persons in diagnostic remission still drank more than the recommended maximum (>7/14 drinks weekly for women/men). Only a minority of people in the Netherlands with alcohol use disorder (AUD) as defined by DSM-5 still have the disorder 3 years later. Factors that help identify people at risk of AUD persistence are: younger age, a higher number of weekly drinks and a comorbid anxiety disorder. A substantial number of people recently in diagnostic remission still drink above the maximum recommended level.
    Addiction 07/2013; 108(12). DOI:10.1111/add.12309 · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Across Europe, tobacco use is more prevalent among secondary school students attending vocational tracks compared with students attending academic tracks. The purpose of the present study is to describe trends in social inequality in daily smoking among adolescents between 2002 and 2010 by addressing both absolute social inequality (prevalence difference between vocational and academic tracks) and relative social inequality (prevalence ratio) in seven European countries. Methods: Analyses were based on data from 15-year-olds who participated in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study in 2002, 2006 and 2010 in Belgium, Croatia, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy and The Netherlands (total N = 32 867). Results: Overall, daily smoking decreased between 2002 and 2010 in Belgium, France, Germany and The Netherlands, increased in Croatia and remained stable in Hungary and Italy. Considerable differences in daily smoking according to educational track existed in all countries. Absolute educational inequalities increased dramatically in Croatia and Italy, while relative inequalities showed a tendency to increase in all countries (significant in Belgium and The Netherlands). Conclusions: Conclusions on social inequality in adolescent smoking may appear differently when described by absolute and relative measures. Especially the large increase in absolute educational inequalities in daily smoking in Croatia and Italy are worrisome and warrant attention from the public health domain. The findings underline the need for appropriate smoking policies and interventions in vocational schools across Europe.
    The European Journal of Public Health 03/2013; 23(5). DOI:10.1093/eurpub/ckt022 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: More physical activity is associated with fewer mental health problems among adolescents, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim of this article is to investigate whether the association between physical activity and mental health is mediated by body-weight perception (self-image) or the social aspects of participation in organized sports (social interaction). Data from 7,304 adolescents were drawn from the Dutch Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. Logistic regression analyses showed that, compared with respondents who were physically active, inactive respondents were at higher risk for both internalizing (odds ratio [OR] = 1.52, p < .001) and externalizing (OR = 1.34, p < .05) problems. The inclusion of body-weight perception and sports-club membership variables reduced the strength of the association to an OR of 1.35 (p < .05) for internalizing problems and an OR of 1.20 (p = .132) for externalizing problems. This study found some support for the self-image and social interaction hypotheses and thereby confirms the importance of the psychological and sociological aspects of physical activity.
    01/2013; 1(1):67-74. DOI:10.1177/2167702612450485
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has provided considerable support for idea that increased parental support and control are strong determinants of lower prevalence levels of adolescent risk behavior. Much less is known on the association between specific parenting practices, such as concrete rules with respect to smoking and drinking and adolescent risk behavior. The present paper examined whether such concrete parental rules (1) have an effect on the targeted behaviors and (2) predict other, frequently co-occurring, risk behaviors (i.e., cannabis use and early sexual intercourse). These hypotheses were tested in a nationally representative sample of 12- to 16-year-old adolescents in the Netherlands. We found that both types of rules were associated with a lower prevalence of the targeted behaviors (i.e., smoking and drinking). In addition, independent of adolescent smoking and drinking behaviors, parental rules on smoking predicted a lower prevalence of cannabis use and early sexual intercourse, and parental rules on alcohol use also predicted a lower prevalence of early sexual intercourse. This study showed that concrete parental rule setting is more strongly related to lower levels of risk behaviors in adolescents compared to the more general parenting practices (i.e., support and control). Additionally, the effects of such rules do not only apply to the targeted behavior but extend to related behaviors as well. These findings are relevant to the public health domain and suggest that a single intervention program that addresses a limited number of concrete parenting practices, in combination with traditional support and control practices, may be effective in reducing risk behaviors in adolescence.
    Prevention Science 09/2012; 13(6). DOI:10.1007/s11121-012-0286-1 · 2.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To compare the strength of the association between peer victimization at school and subjective health according to the disability or chronic illness (D/CI) status of students across countries. METHODS: This study used data from 55 030 students aged 11, 13 and 15 years from 11 countries participating in the 2005-06 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey. Self-completed questionnaires were administered in classrooms. Multivariate models of logistic regression (controlled for confounding factors and countries) were used to investigate differences in the association between peer victimization and poor subjective health according to the D/CI status. RESULTS: Overall, 13.5% of the students reported having been bullied at least two or three times a month. The percentage of victims was significantly higher among those reporting D/CI than among others in all countries studied. Victims of bullying were more likely to report poor self-rated health, low life satisfaction and multiple health complaints. However, there were no differences in the associations between peer victimization and subjective health indicators according to the D/CI status. CONCLUSIONS: In all countries studied, students reporting D/CI were more likely to report being victims of bullying. Victims of bullying reported more negative subjective health outcomes regardless of their D/CI status. Although inclusive education is currently a major topic of educational policies in most countries, additional efforts should be made to improve the quality of the integration of students with D/CI.
    The European Journal of Public Health 08/2012; DOI:10.1093/eurpub/cks073 · 2.46 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
343.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2015
    • Utrecht University
      • • Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science
      • • Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences
      • • Department of Social Sciences
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2002–2009
    • The Netherlands Institute for Addiction Healthcare
      Arnheim, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2000–2009
    • Maastricht University
      • Department of Psychiatry & Neuropsychology
      Maestricht, Limburg, Netherlands
  • 2002–2007
    • Trimbos-instituut
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2006
    • Leiden University
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004
    • Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2002–2004
    • University of Groningen
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands