Naghmeh Riyazi

HagaZiekenhuis van Den Haag, 's-Gravenhage, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (23)90.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To assess the association between high body mass index (BMI) and treatment response in recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis. Methods In the Behandelstrategieën voor Reumatoide Artritis (Treatment Strategies for Rheumatoid Arthritis) study, 508 patients were randomized to initial monotherapy or combination therapy with prednisone or infliximab (IFX). The response to Disease Activity Score (DAS) ≤2.4–steered treatment (first dose and after 1 year) was compared between patients with a BMI
    Arthritis Care & Research. 08/2013; 65(8).
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the course of hand osteoarthritis over 2 years by currently available outcome measures. 189 participants of the Genetics, Arthrosis and Progression (GARP) study with hand osteoarthritis were followed for 2 years. Self-reported hand pain and functional limitations were assessed with the Australian/Canadian osteoarthritis hand index (AUSCAN LK 3.0). Pain intensity upon lateral pressure in the interphalangeal and thumb base joints was graded on a four-point scale. Osteophytes (0-3) and joint space narrowing (JSN) (0-3) was scored at baseline and after 2 years in interphalangeal and thumb base joints. Standardised response means (SRM) were calculated. 172 (91%) patients completed the 2-year follow-up (mean age 60.5 years, 78.5% women). Statistically significant increases in self-reported pain and function scores, in pain intensity scores as well as in osteophyte and JSN total scores were seen over 2 years. SRM were 0.25, 0.23, 0.67, 0.34 and 0.35, respectively, for self-reported pain and function scores, pain intensity scores, osteophyte and JSN total scores. Radiological progression was not associated with changes in self-reported pain and function. Women in an early post-menopausal stage were especially at risk of progressing radiologically. Currently available outcome measures were able to assess progression over the relatively short time period of 2 years. Radiographic outcomes were more responsive than self-reported outcomes. Pain intensity upon lateral pressure seems to be a responsive measure but needs validation.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 08/2008; 68(8):1260-4. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis [MIM 165720] is a common late-onset articular joint disease for which no pharmaceutical intervention is available to attenuate the cartilage degeneration. To identify a new osteoarthritis susceptibility locus, a genome-wide linkage scan and combined linkage association analysis were applied to 179 affected siblings and four trios with generalized osteoarthritis (The GARP study). We tested, for confirmation by association, 1478 subjects who required joint replacement and 734 controls in a UK population. Additional replication was tested in 1582 population-based females from the Rotterdam study that contained 94 cases with defined hip osteoarthritis and in 267 Japanese females with symptomatic hip osteoarthritis and 465 controls. Suggested evidence for linkage in the GARP study was observed on chromosome 14q32.11 (log of odds = 3.03, P = 1.9 x 10(-4)). Genotyping tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering three important candidate genes revealed a common coding variant (rs225014; Thr92Ala) in the iodothyronine-deiodinase enzyme type 2 (D2) gene (DIO2 [MIM 601413]) which significantly explained the linkage signal (P = 0.006). Confirmation and replication by association in the additional osteoarthritis studies indicated a common DIO2 haplotype, exclusively containing the minor allele of rs225014 and common allele of rs12885300, with a combined recessive odds ratio of 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.34 with P = 2.02 x 10(-5) in female cases with advanced/symptomatic hip osteoarthritis. The gene product of this DIO2 converts intracellular pro-hormone-3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) into the active thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) thereby regulating intracellular levels of active T3 in target tissues such as the growth plate. Our results indicate a new susceptibility gene (DIO2) conferring risk to osteoarthritis.
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2008; 17(12):1867-75. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the association between systemic and local risk factors and familial osteoarthritis (OA) at multiple sites. Patients and their siblings had primary OA at multiple sites at middle age. OA diagnosis followed the American College of Rheumatology criteria. We recruited 345 controls (mean age 57 years (range 40-76), 64% women) by random sampling from the population by telephone and collected all data by questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for sex, age and body mass index (BMI) (kg/m(2)), 95% confidence intervals (CIs95) were computed using robust standard errors with the intra-family effect taken into account. Three hundred and eighty-two patients (mean age 60 years [range 43-79]), 82% women had OA in the spine (80%), hands (72%), knees (34%) and hips (24%). In women, an association of familial OA with a young age at natural menopause (<45 years), OR=2.6 (CI95 1.5-4.5) was found. Physically demanding jobs led to an increased risk of familial OA in men: OR=2.6 (CI95 1.3-5.3). Familial OA was more prevalent in individuals with a BMI>30, OR=2.0 (CI95 1.3-3.2) compared to a BMI of <25. Taller persons had a lower risk of familial OA, OR=0.33 (0.1-0.8) in the height category >180 cm relative to a height of <160 cm. A history of meniscectomy, increased the risk of familial OA at multiple sites with knee involvement, OR=6.2 (CI95 3.0-12.7). Systemic and local risk factors play a role in the etiology of familial OA at multiple sites.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 07/2008; 16(6):654-9. · 4.26 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 01/2007; 15. · 4.26 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 01/2007; 15. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as framework, we evaluated modifying effects of illness perceptions and mental health on the association between impairments in body structures and functions due to osteoarthritis (OA) and limitation in activities in the lower extremities. Self-reported limitation in activities was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index (WOMAC) function subscale in 316 patients with knee or hip pain or evidence of OA on knee or hip radiographs. Body structures and functions were evaluated during clinical and radiological assessments. Illness perceptions and mental health were assessed with the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and the mental component summary score of the RAND 36-item Health Survey, respectively. For each patient an expected WOMAC function score was calculated, using an equation based on a multivariate model of the association of body structures and functions with limitation in activities. The median (interquartile) self-reported WOMAC function score was 22.2 (9.6-43.5). Ninety-one patients reported more and 120 patients reported less limitation in activities than expected. Patients with lumbar spine degeneration, physical or exercise therapy and high IPQ-R identity, consequences and chronic timeline scores had an increased risk to report more limitation in activities than the expected range. Low IPQ-R identity, consequences and emotional representation scores and better mental health were associated with reporting less limitation in activities than the expected range. Illness perceptions and mental health modify the association between self-reported limitation in activities and calculated limitation in activities based on impairments in body structures and functions due to OA.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 12/2006; 14(11):1104-10. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Seven polymorphisms in the matrilin-3(MATN3) gene were previously tested for genetic association with hand osteoarthritis in an Icelandic cohort. One of the variants, involving a conserved amino acid substitution (T303M; SNP5), was related to idiopathic hand osteoarthritis. To investigate SNP5 and two other promising polymorphisms (rs2242190; SNP3, rs8176070; SNP6) for association with radiographic and symptomatic hand osteoarthritis phenotypes, as well as other heritable phenotypes. Polymorphisms were examined in two distinct cohorts of subjects: a population based sample from the Rotterdam study (n = 809), and affected siblings from the genetics, osteoarthrosis and progression (GARP) study (n = 382). The originally described association of T303M with the hand osteoarthritis phenotype was not observed in the populations studied. In the Rotterdam sample, however, carrying the T allele of T303M conferred an odds ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2 to 7.3; p = 0.02) for spinal disc degeneration. In the GARP study, carriers of the A allele of SNP6 had an odds ratio of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.3 to 3.1, p = 0.004) for osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint (CMC1) as compared with the Rotterdam sample as a control group. Subsequent haplotype analysis showed that a common haplotype, containing the risk allele of SNP6, conferred a significant risk in sibling pairs with CMC1 osteoarthritis (odds ratio = 1.7 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.7, p = 0.02)). These associations suggest that the MATN3 region also determines susceptibility to spinal disc degeneration and CMC1 osteoarthritis.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 09/2006; 65(8):1060-6. · 9.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To prospectively evaluate the association between clinical features and structural abnormalities found at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The study was approved by the institutional medical ethics review board. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient. MR images of the knee were obtained from 205 (42 [20%] men, 163 [80%] women; median age, 60 years; range, 43-77 years) patients in whom symptomatic OA at multiple joint sites was diagnosed. MR images were analyzed for various abnormalities of OA. All patients were interviewed concerning pain and stiffness in the knee that was imaged. Odds ratios (ORs) with 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to determine the association between the imaging findings and clinical features of OA. A large joint effusion was associated with pain (OR, 9.99; 99% CI: 1.28, 149) and stiffness (OR, 4.67; 99% CI: 1.26, 26.1). The presence of an osteophyte in the patellofemoral compartment (OR, 2.25; 99% CI: 1.06, 4.77) was associated with pain. All other imaging findings, including focal or diffuse cartilaginous abnormalities, subchondral cysts, bone marrow edema, subluxation of the meniscus, meniscal tears, or Baker cysts, were not associated with symptoms. Findings of this study indicate that only two associations exist between clinical symptoms and structural findings found on MR images in patients with OA of the knee.
    Radiology 07/2006; 239(3):811-7. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. 01/2006; 14:S146.
  • Revue du rhumatisme. 01/2006; 73(10-11):1031-1031.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between osteoarthritic changes seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral (PF) or tibiofemoral (TF) compartments in patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. MR images of the knee were obtained in 105 sib pairs (210 patients) who had been diagnosed with OA at multiple joints. Entry criteria included that the degree of OA in the knee examined should be between a Kellgren and Lawrence score of 2 or 3. MR images were analyzed for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, bone marrow edema (BME) and meniscal tears. The relationship between findings in the medial and lateral aspects of the PF and TF compartments was examined. The number of cartilaginous defects on either side of the PF compartment correlated positively with number of cartilaginous defects in the ipsilateral TF compartment (odds ratio, OR, 55, confidence interval, CI, 7.8-382). The number of cartilaginous defects in the PF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 3.7, CI 1.0-14) and ipsilateral PF BME (OR 17, CI 3.8-72). Cartilaginous defects in the TF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 9.8, CI 2.5-38) and ipsilateral TF BME (OR 120, CI 6.5-2,221). Osteoarthritic defects lateralize or medialize in the PF and TF compartments of the knee in patients with mild OA.
    European Radiology 09/2005; 15(8):1538-43. · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The interleukin (IL)-10 single nucleotide promoter polymorphism (SNP) -2849A is associated with decreased IL-10 production as measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated whole blood cultures. A low innate production of IL-10 using the same assay is associated with an increased risk of familial osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the association of 7 novel SNP located downstream of the IL-10 transcription start site: -2849,-2763, -1330, -1082, -819, and -592, constituting the 4 ancient haplotypes, with distal interphalangeal (DIP) OA. The study population comprised consecutive patients with and without radiological DIP OA (Kellgren-Lawrence score of > or = 2 in one joint) aged 40-70 years from a cohort of subjects with different types of arthritis in an early stage referred to an Early Arthritis Clinic (EAC). DNA typing for IL-10 SNP as well as radiographs of the hands were performed at clinic enrolment. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, spondyloarthropathies, and psoriatic arthritis were excluded. The distribution of DIP OA and IL-10 SNP were comparable to representative samples of the Dutch population. In the cohort of 172 subjects, 57 had DIP OA (33%) and 115 (67%) had no DIP OA. No significant association was found between DIP OA and IL-10 SNP and the 4 common haplotypes IL10.1, IL10.2, IL10.3, and IL10.4. Our data suggest that IL-10 SNP, including -2849, which is associated with differential production, do not play a major role in the susceptibility of DIP OA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2005; 32(8):1571-5. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a sibpair study of osteoarthritis (OA) patients, we investigated whether, upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), variations in the innate ex vivo production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) in whole-blood assays contribute to the risk of OA. Data from 305 patients with OA at multiple sites (hand, knee, hip, and spine), whose median age was 60 years (range 43-79 years), were compared with those from 137 controls. OA was defined in accordance with the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Whole-blood samples were stimulated with LPS (10 ng/ml). In the supernatants, cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Odds ratios (ORs) were used as measures of the relative risk of OA in relation to quartiles of IL-1beta, IL-1Ra, TNFalpha, and IL-10 production. The ORs were adjusted for sex and age, and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were computed using robust standard errors to take into account the intrafamily effect. Subjects in the highest quartile of IL-1beta and IL-1Ra had an increased risk of OA (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-7.9 and OR 8.0, 95% CI 3.7-17.4, respectively), while subjects in the lowest quartile of IL-10 had a 3-fold increased risk of OA (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.5-6.5). High innate ex vivo production of TNFalpha was not associated with an increased risk of OA. Subjects with a high innate ex vivo production of IL-1beta and IL-1Ra and low innate ex vivo production of IL-10 have an increased risk of OA. These results suggest that a proportion of the genetic susceptibility to OA may be encoded for by variations in innate cytokine activity.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 06/2005; 52(5):1443-50. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To confirm the association of 2 variants of the Frizzled-related protein gene (FRZB) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip, and to investigate whether these variants also associate with other heritable generalized OA phenotypes. An association analysis of 2 variants (R200W and R324G) of FRZB was performed in a random sample of 1,369 subjects (ages 55-70 years) from a population-based cohort (the Rotterdam Study) scored for radiographic characteristics of OA in the hip, hand, spine, and knee and in a patient population of Caucasian probands (ages 40-70 years) and their siblings selected for the presence of primary symptomatic OA at multiple sites. The allele frequency of the 2 variants was not significantly different between subjects with hip radiographic OA (ROA) and controls. The frequency of the G allele of the R324G variant was significantly increased in subjects with generalized ROA from the Rotterdam Study (0.10) and in subjects from the Genetics, osteoARthritis and Progression study (0.11) compared with that in controls from the Rotterdam Study (0.08). Carriers of this G allele had increased susceptibility for generalized ROA (odds ratio [OR] 1.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.9-1.9, P = 0.10) or familial symptomatic OA at multiple sites (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3, P = 0.02). Our results confirm that the R324G variant of the FRZB gene is involved in OA and indicate a role of this variant in several generalized OA phenotypes. A more extended OA phenotype may indeed be expected from genetic variation in an essential pathway of skeletal development such as Wnt signaling.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 05/2005; 52(4):1077-80. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether familial aggregation of osteoarthritis differs by joint site in a sibling pair study (GARP) of patients with osteoarthritis at multiple sites. White Dutch probands aged 40 to 70 years and their siblings with primary osteoarthritis at multiple sites. The diagnosis of knee, hip, and spine osteoarthritis was based on a combination of pain or stiffness on most days of the previous month and osteophytes or joint space narrowing on x ray. Hand osteoarthritis was defined by ACR criteria. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for siblings and probands sharing disease in the same joints. 191 sibling pairs were included (85% women; mean age 60 years). In the probands, osteoarthritis was present in spine (76%), hands (77%), knees (37%), and hips (26%). The most common combinations in probands were spine-hand (59%), spine-knee (27%), and hand-knee (25%). The OR adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index for siblings to be affected in the same joint sites as the proband were increased in osteoarthritis of the hand (OR = 4.4 (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 9.5)), hip (OR = 3.9 (1.8 to 8.4)), spine (OR = 2.2 (1.0 to 5.1)), hip-spine (OR = 4.7 (2.1 to 10.4)), and hand-hip (OR = 3.4 (1.1 to 10.4)). Siblings of probands with osteoarthritis in the knee did not have an increased likelihood of knee osteoarthritis. In middle aged patients with familial osteoarthritis at multiple sites, familial aggregation of osteoarthritis was most striking for hand and hip but remarkably absent for the knee.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 04/2005; 64(3):438-43. · 9.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a scoring system for quantifying osteoarthritic changes of the knee as identified by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and to determine its inter- and intra-observer reproducibility, in order to monitor medical therapy in research studies. Two independent observers evaluated 25 consecutive MR examinations of the knee in patients with previously defined clinical symptoms and radiological signs of osteoarthritis. We acquired on a 1.5 T system: coronal and sagittal proton density- and T2-weighted dual spin echo (SE) images, sagittal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) images with fat suppression, and axial dual turbo SE images with fat suppression. Images were scored for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, bone marrow edema, and for meniscal abnormalities. Presence and size of effusion, synovitis and Baker's cyst were recorded. All parameters were ranked on a previously defined, semiquantitative scale, reflecting increasing severity of findings. Kappa, weighted kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to determine inter- and intra-observer variability. Inter-observer reproducibility was good (ICC value 0.77). Inter- and intra-observer reproducibility for individual parameters was good to very good (inter-observer ICC value 0.63-0.91; intra-observer ICC value 0.76-0.96). The presented comprehensive MR scoring system for osteoarthritic changes of the knee has a good to very good inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility. Thus the score form with its definitions can be used for standardized assessment of osteoarthritic changes to monitor medical therapy in research studies.
    Skeletal Radiology 03/2005; 34(2):95-102. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether there is an association between HLA class II and distal interphalangeal osteoarthritis (DIP OA). The study group consisted of consecutive patients with and without DIP OA aged between 40 and 70 years. DIP OA was diagnosed by radiology. These patients were referred to an "Early Arthritis Clinic" (EAC) with different types of arthritis at an early stage. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, spondyloarthropathies, and psoriatic arthritis were excluded for the purpose of this study. DNA typing for HLA-DR and x ray examination of the hands were performed at enrollment in the EAC. To establish whether the study group was representative of the Dutch population, a population based study in Zoetermeer (n=3243) for the prevalence of DIP OA and blood donors in the Leiden area (n=2400) for the HLA-DR antigen frequencies were used as references. Fifty five patients (33%) of the total study group (n=166) had DIP OA. The prevalence of DIP OA and frequency of the HLA-DR alleles were similar to those of the two reference groups. Within the study group an association between DIP OA and HLA-DR2 and DR4 with respectively odds ratios of 2.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 5.0) and 0.3 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.7) was found. No association was found between other HLA-DR alleles and DIP OA. The study group is a representative sample of the Dutch population. The HLA-DR2 allele was more common in patients with DIP OA. Furthermore, an inverse relation was observed between DIP OA and HLA-DR4. The results confirm findings from other investigations implicating HLA-DR2 as a risk factor in the development of DIP OA.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 04/2003; 62(3):227-30. · 9.11 Impact Factor
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    Naghmeh Riyazi
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a heterogeneous group of conditions. This thesis focuses on OA with a hereditary background; Familial OA at multiple joint sites and radiological hand OA at middle age. The main objective is to identify risk factors that play a role in the development of OA in order to gain further insight in the aetiology of OA. The secondary objective is to investigate factors that determine the outcome in OA. This thesis provides evidence that familial clustering of symptomatic OA is most prominent for hand and hip OA. In search for genetic risk factors, we present data suggesting that a proportion of the genetic susceptibility for OA at multiple sites is encoded by variation in innate cytokine activity. Further, we find HLA-DR antigens to be associated with radiological hand OA. In addition to genetic risk factors, this thesis demonstrates that other systemic risk factors such as hormonal status and local factors, to be important in the susceptibility of familial OA at multiple sites, underscoring the multicausal etioliology of this phenotype. Finally, this thesis addresses the resulting disability from OA. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as framework, we show illness perceptions and mental health to be important modifying factors in OA in the hands and lower extremities.
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common late-onset joint disease with complex inheritance for which multiple susceptibility loci have been revealed. Here, we report a genome- wide nonparametric linkage analysis of 183 sibling pairs with a generalised OA phenotype from the Genetics OsteoARthritis and Progression (GARP) study. The GARP study consists of probands (aged 40-70 years) and their siblings of Dutch ancestry with predominantly symptomatic familial OA at multiple joint sites of the hand or in two or more of the following joints sites: hand, spine, knee or hip. Suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 14q32.11 (LOD = 2.37, P = 0.0005). The location of the linkage peak revealed three candidate genes: calmodulin 1 (CALM1 ), fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein 2 ( FLRT2 ) and iodothyronine deiodinase enzyme type 2 ( DIO2 ). The CALM1 gene was previously associated with hip OA in the Japanese population. Subsequent genotyping and joint modelling of linkage and association of tagging SNPs in these genes and the functional CALM1 variant (rs12885713) did not explain the observed linkage signal. However, the C allele of DIO2 rs225014 ( P = 0.02) and the corresponding haplotype CCGC ( P = 0.05) were shown to explain part of the linkage. DIO2 is a regulator of thyroid hormone metabolism in the growth plate and may confer susceptibility for OA at multiple joint sites. Together our results implicate for the first time that the thyroid hormone metabolism is involved in OA.