Cornelius Katona

University College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

Are you Cornelius Katona?

Claim your profile

Publications (133)715.15 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Population screening might provide a mechanism to enable early detection of dementia. Yet the potential benefits, harms or acceptability of such a large-scale intervention are not well understood. This research aims to examine the attitudes and preferences of the general public, health care professionals, people with dementia and their carers towards population screening for dementia. A systematic review of the international literature was undertaken. A search of fifteen bibliographic databases was conducted (up to 12 July 2012; no language restriction) using terms related to dementia, screening, specific screening tools, case finding, and attitudes and preferences; genetic screening and biomarkers were excluded. All study designs were included except opinion-based papers. Included papers were doubly quality assessed and thematically analysed using NVivo. 29,910 papers were identified of which 29 met the inclusion criteria. We identified seventeen themes relating to the 3 phases of the screening process (pre-, in- and post-screen) - none emerged as more of a facilitator than a barrier to the acceptance of dementia screening. Seven themes emerged in relation to the patient, carer and general population: existing health state; lifestyle and life view; awareness of dementia; role of clinician; communication; benefit; and role of the family. Ten themes emerged in relation to the clinician and healthcare professional: patient's existing health and comorbidities; awareness of dementia; confidence; duration of patient contact; suitability of screening tool; cost; disclosure; time; treatment and prognosis; and stigma. As for all screening programmes, screening for dementia raises complex issues around preference and choice for clinicians and the public, and it is unclear what specific factors promote or reduce screening acceptance the most. Overall, the level of evidence is low, few large scale studies have been undertaken and none were conducted in representative samples, all affecting the generalizability of identified themes across healthcare contexts. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that population screening for dementia may not be acceptable to either the general public or health care professionals, and highlight where focused efforts are needed to gain insights into dementia specific issues.
    BMC Genetics 06/2015; 15(66). DOI:10.1186/s12877-015-0064-6 · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While nearly half of all people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have agitation symptoms every month, little is known about the costs of agitation in AD. We calculated the monetary costs associated with agitation in older adults with AD in the UK from a National Health Service and personal social services perspective. Prospective cohort study. London and the South East Region of the UK (LASER-AD study). 224 people with AD recruited between July 2002 and January 2003 and followed up for 54 months. The primary outcome was health and social care costs, including accommodation costs and costs of contacts with health and social care services. Agitation was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) agitation score. After adjustment, health and social care costs varied significantly by agitation, from £29 000 over a 1 year period with no agitation symptoms (NPI agitation score=0) to £57 000 at the most severe levels of agitation (NPI agitation score=12; p=0.01). The mean excess cost associated with agitation per person with AD was £4091 a year, accounting for 12% of the health and social care costs of AD in our data, and equating to £2 billion a year across all people with AD in the UK. Agitation in people with AD represents a substantial monetary burden over and above the costs associated with cognitive impairment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    BMJ Open 03/2015; 5(3):e007382. DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007382 · 2.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Agitation in dementia is common, persistent and distressing and can lead to care breakdown. Medication is often ineffective and harmful. Aims To systematically review randomised controlled trial evidence regarding non-pharmacological interventions. Method We reviewed 33 studies fitting predetermined criteria, assessed their validity and calculated standardised effect sizes (SES). Results Person-centred care, communication skills training and adapted dementia care mapping decreased symptomatic and severe agitation in care homes immediately (SES range 0.3-1.8) and for up to 6 months afterwards (SES range 0.2-2.2). Activities and music therapy by protocol (SES range 0.5-0.6) decreased overall agitation and sensory intervention decreased clinically significant agitation immediately. Aromatherapy and light therapy did not demonstrate efficacy. Conclusions There are evidence-based strategies for care homes. Future interventions should focus on consistent and long-term implementation through staff training. Further research is needed for people living in their own homes. Royal College of Psychiatrists.
    The British journal of psychiatry: the journal of mental science 12/2014; 205(6):436-442. DOI:10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141119 · 7.34 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Case management may be a feasible solution to the problem of service fragmentation for people with dementia.
    British Journal of General Practice 11/2014; 64(628):e735-41. DOI:10.3399/bjgp14X682333 · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Cornelius Katona, Dorothea C. Bindman, Cara P. Katona
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper updates our previous review of the evidence base for managing depression in old age while focusing more specifically on the use of antidepressants. Overall, recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that antidepressants are effective in the acute treatment of depression in old age but that the superiority of active drug over placebo is quite modest. The depression of Alzheimer's disease is probably not treated effectively with antidepressants. The most consistent evidence is for the effectiveness of continued antidepressant treatment in those depressed patients who respond well to acute treatment. There remains a clear need for more research to identify effective treatments for resistant depression though therapeutic nihilism should be avoided if first-line treatment fails.
    Maturitas 10/2014; 79(2). DOI:10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.05.016 · 2.86 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Lithium augmentation of antidepressants for treatment of unipolar major depression was one of the first adjunctive strategies based on a neuropharmacologic rationale. Randomized controlled trials supported its efficacy but most trials added lithium to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Despite its efficacy, use of lithium augmentation remains infrequent. The current systematic review and meta-analysis examines the efficacy of lithium augmentation as an adjunct to second generation antidepressants as well as to TCAs and considers reasons for its infrequent use. Method A systematic search of Medline and the Cochrane Clinical Trials database was performed. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of lithium augmentation were selected. A fixed-effects meta-analysis was performed. Odds ratios for response were calculated for each treatment-control contrast, for the trials grouped by type of initial antidepressant (TCA or second generation antidepressant), and as a meta-analytic summary for all treatments combined. Results Nine trials that included 237 patients were selected. The odds ratio for response to lithium vs. placebo in all contrasts combined was 2.89 (95% CI 1.65, 5.05, z=3.72, p=0.0002). Heterogeneity was very low, I2=0%. Adjunctive lithium was effective with TCAs (7 contrasts) and with second generation agents (3 contrasts). Discontinuation due to adverse events was infrequent and did not differ between lithium and placebo. Limitations The meta-analysis is limited by the small size and number of trials and limited data for treatment resistant patients. Conclusions Adjunctive lithium appears to be as effective for second generation antidepressants as it was for the tricyclics.
    Journal of Affective Disorders 10/2014; 168:269–275. DOI:10.1016/j.jad.2014.05.053 · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: People with dementia and their families need support in different forms, but currently services are often fragmented with variable quality of care. Case management offers a way of co-ordinating services along the care pathway and therefore could provide individualised support; however, evidence of the effectiveness of case management for dementia is inconclusive.
    Health technology assessment (Winchester, England) 08/2014; 18(52):1-148. DOI:10.3310/hta18520 · 5.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The need for carers to manage medication-related problems for people with dementia living in the community raises dilemmas, which can be identified by carers and people with dementia as key issues for developing carer-relevant research projects. A research planning Public Patient Involvement (PPI) workshop using adapted focus group methodology was held at the Alzheimer’s Society’s national office, involving carers of people with dementia who were current members of the Alzheimer’s Society Research Network (ASRN) in dialogue with health professionals aimed to identify key issues in relation to medication management in dementia from the carer viewpoint. The group was facilitated by a specialist mental health pharmacist, using a topic guide developed systematically with carers, health professionals and researchers. Audio-recordings and field notes were made at the time and were transcribed and analysed thematically. The participants included nine carers in addition to academics, clinicians, and staff from DeNDRoN (Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network) and the Alzheimer’s Society. Findings Significant themes, for carers, which emerged from the workshop were related to: (1) medication usage and administration practicalities, (2) communication barriers and facilitators, (3) bearing and sharing responsibility and (4) weighing up medication risks and benefits. These can form the basis for more in-depth qualitative research involving a broader, more diverse sample. Discussion The supported discussion enabled carer voices and perspectives to be expressed and to be linked to the process of identifying problems in medications management as directly experienced by carers. This was used to inform an agenda for research proposals which would be meaningful for carers and people with dementia.
    BMC Research Notes 07/2014; 7(1):463. DOI:10.1186/1756-0500-7-463
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Agitation is common, persistent and distressing in dementia and is linked with care breakdown. Psychotropic medication is often ineffective or harmful, but the evidence regarding non-pharmacological interventions is unclear.
    Health technology assessment (Winchester, England) 06/2014; 18(39):1-226. DOI:10.3310/hta18390 · 5.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Cornelius L Katona, Cara P Katona
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vortioxetine is a novel antidepressant with effects on multiple 5-HT receptors and on the serotonin transporter. This paper reviews preclinical and clinical evidence regarding its mechanism of action, its tolerability, and its efficacy in treating major depression. Clinical studies indicate that vortioxetine is effective in the treatment of major depression, though there is no suggestion of superiority over active comparators. There may be a clinically meaningful advantage in terms of tolerability.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 02/2014; 10:349-354. DOI:10.2147/NDT.S39544 · 2.15 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This review considers key areas in primary care regarding the diagnosis of dementia. Issues surrounding assessment, policy and incentives are considered. In addition, the relevance of non-medication approaches for dementia in primary care, which aim to enhance or maintain quality of life by maximising psychological and social function in the context of existing disabilities, is deliberated. Finally, key issues about primary care medication management are considered, and relevant therapeutic strategies with recommendation for a collaborative approach that improve outcomes by linking primary and secondary healthcare services - including general practice and pharmacy - with social care needs are weighed up. A key aspect of such a collaborative approach is to support informal carers in optimising medication.
    Mental Health in Family Medicine 09/2013; 10(3):143-51.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To review systematically, for the first time, the effectiveness of all pharmacologic interventions to improve quality of life and well-being in people with dementia. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We systematically reviewed the 15 randomized controlled trials and one review that fitted predetermined criteria. We included studies that reported the outcomes quality of life, well-being, happiness, or pleasure. We rated the validity of studies using a checklist. We calculated mean differences between intervention and control groups at follow-up. None of the evaluated trials reported a significant benefit to quality of life or well-being for people with dementia when comparing those taking a drug or its comparator at follow-up (pooled weighted mean difference: 0.18 [95% confidence interval: -0.82 to 0.46]). We found no consistent evidence that any drug improves quality of life in people with dementia. We recommend that all dementia trials should include quality of life as an outcome, as this is important to patients, and cannot be presumed from improvements in cognition or other symptomatic outcomes, especially if the latter are small.
    The American journal of geriatric psychiatry: official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry 02/2013; 21(2):173-83. DOI:10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.018 · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and costly comorbidity in dementia. There are very few data on the cost-effectiveness of antidepressants for depression in dementia and their effects on carer outcomes. AIMS: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of sertraline and mirtazapine compared with placebo for depression in dementia. METHOD: A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial with a parallel cost-effectiveness analysis (trial registration: ISRCTN88882979 and EudraCT 2006-000105-38). The primary cost-effectiveness analysis compared differences in treatment costs for patients receiving sertraline, mirtazapine or placebo with differences in effectiveness measured by the primary outcome, total Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) score, over two time periods: 0-13 weeks and 0-39 weeks. The secondary evaluation was a cost-utility analysis using quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) computed from the Euro-Qual (EQ-5D) and societal weights over those same periods. RESULTS: There were 339 participants randomised and 326 with costs data (111 placebo, 107 sertraline, 108 mirtazapine). For the primary outcome, decrease in depression, mirtazapine and sertraline were not cost-effective compared with placebo. However, examining secondary outcomes, the time spent by unpaid carers caring for participants in the mirtazapine group was almost half that for patients receiving placebo (6.74 v. 12.27 hours per week) or sertraline (6.74 v. 12.32 hours per week). Informal care costs over 39 weeks were £1510 and £1522 less for the mirtazapine group compared with placebo and sertraline respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of reducing depression, mirtazapine and sertraline were not cost-effective for treating depression in dementia. However, mirtazapine does appear likely to have been cost-effective if costing includes the impact on unpaid carers and with quality of life included in the outcome. Unpaid (family) carer costs were lower with mirtazapine than sertraline or placebo. This may have been mediated via the putative ability of mirtazapine to ameliorate sleep disturbances and anxiety. Given the priority and the potential value of supporting family carers of people with dementia, further research is warranted to investigate the potential of mirtazapine to help with behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia and in supporting carers.
    The British journal of psychiatry: the journal of mental science 12/2012; 202(2). DOI:10.1192/bjp.bp.112.115212 · 7.34 Impact Factor
  • Matthew McDonnell, Katy Robjant, Cornelius Katona
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) and proposes future research which would help to establish the nature of CPTSD in relation to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). RECENT FINDINGS: Research on survivors of torture and war has found that CPTSD can occur when there is no history of childhood abuse. fMRI studies appear to highlight differences in neural activity in individuals exhibiting primary dissociation compared with individuals exhibiting secondary dissociation. Research has begun to show that, when symptoms of secondary dissociation are appropriately managed, exposure-based therapies are an effective treatment for individuals with CPTSD. SUMMARY: Much research on CPTSD has emphasized its developmental basis and the disruptive effects of trauma in childhood and adolescence on subsequent emotional development. However, some studies on survivors of torture in adult life identify similar symptom patterns, despite there being no history of childhood trauma. It is argued that comparative research is required between victims of developmental trauma (such as childhood sexual abuse) and victims who experienced prolonged interpersonal trauma in adulthood (such as torture), as this could be useful in establishing the cause of CPTSD and in delineating clinically and therapeutically meaningful subtypes. It is also proposed that a focus on underlying neurobiological processes would help in developing and refining CPTSD as a construct and informing treatment.
    Current opinion in psychiatry 11/2012; 26(1). DOI:10.1097/YCO.0b013e32835aea9d · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to examine the safety and tolerability of duloxetine hydrochloride, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, in a large cohort of elderly patients with major depressive disorder. Data were pooled from 8-week and 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine 60 mg/day (duloxetine=456; placebo=225). Discontinuation rates because of adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events, abnormal changes in vital signs and weight, and changes in laboratory analytes were compared between treatments using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Changes in laboratory analytes were analyzed using an analysis of variance model. Adverse event-related discontinuation rates were not significantly different between duloxetine and placebo (10.7 vs. 7.1%; P=0.13). Treatment-emergent adverse events for duloxetine of at least 5% and twice the rate of placebo were dry mouth, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, and fatigue. Abnormal changes in vital signs and weight were not significantly different at any time between duloxetine and placebo. The mean changes in platelet count, alkaline phosphatase, potassium, random glucose, uric acid, and cholesterol were significantly different between duloxetine and placebo (P<0.05), but none of these differences were considered clinically relevant. The incidence of abnormal low sodium levels was not significantly different between treatments. These safety results may better inform clinicians providing individualized care to elderly patients with major depressive disorder.
    International clinical psychopharmacology 11/2012; 28(1). DOI:10.1097/YIC.0b013e32835b09cd · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Existing drugs for Alzheimer's disease provide symptomatic benefit for up to 12 months, but there are no approved disease-modifying therapies. Given the recent failures of various novel disease-modifying therapies in clinical trials, a complementary strategy based on repositioning drugs that are approved for other indications could be attractive. Indeed, a substantial body of preclinical work indicates that several classes of such drugs have potentially beneficial effects on Alzheimer's-like brain pathology, and for some drugs the evidence is also supported by epidemiological data or preliminary clinical trials. Here, we present a formal consensus evaluation of these opportunities, based on a systematic review of published literature. We highlight several compounds for which sufficient evidence is available to encourage further investigation to clarify an optimal dose and consider progression to clinical trials in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
    dressNature Reviews Drug Discovery 11/2012; 11(11):833-46. DOI:10.1038/nrd3869 · 37.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To review systematically, for the first time, the effectiveness of all pharmacologic interventions to improve quality of life and well-being in people with dementia. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We systematically reviewed the 15 randomized controlled trials and one review that fitted predetermined criteria. We included studies that reported the outcomes quality of life, well-being, happiness, or pleasure. Measurements: We rated the validity of studies using a checklist. We calculated mean differences between intervention and control groups at follow-up. Results: None of the evaluated trials reported a significant benefit to quality of life or well-being for people with dementia when comparing those taking a drug or its comparator at follow-up (pooled weighted mean difference: 0.18 [95% confidence interval: -0.82 to 0.46]). Conclusion: We found no consistent evidence that any drug improves quality of life in people with dementia. We recommend that all dementia trials should include quality of life as an outcome, as this is important to patients, and cannot be presumed from improvements in cognition or other symptomatic outcomes, especially if the latter are small. Copyright (C) 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
    American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 08/2012; Publish Ahead of Print. DOI:10.1097/JGP.0b013e31823e31a2 · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The efficacy and tolerability of Lu AA21004 at 5 mg/day, a novel multimodal antidepressant, were assessed in elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to Lu AA21004 5 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day (reference) or to placebo in an 8-week double-blind study. The primary efficacy measure was the 24-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D(24)) total score (analysis of covariance, last observation carried forward). Patients (mean age 70.6 years) had a mean baseline HAM-D(24) score of 29.0. Lu AA21004 showed significantly (P = 0.0011) greater improvement on the primary efficacy endpoint compared with placebo at week 8 (3.3 points). Duloxetine also showed superiority to placebo at week 8, thereby validating the study. HAM-D(24) response (53.2 vs. 35.2%) and HAM-D(17) remission (29.2 vs. 19.3%) rates at endpoint were higher for Lu AA21004 than for placebo. Lu AA21004 showed superiority to placebo in cognition tests of speed of processing, verbal learning and memory. The withdrawal rate due to adverse events was 5.8% (Lu AA21004), 9.9% (duloxetine) and 2.8% (placebo). Whereas nausea was the only adverse event with a significantly higher incidence on treatment with Lu AA21004 (21.8%) compared with placebo (8.3%), the incidence of nausea, constipation, dry mouth, hyperhidrosis and somnolence was higher for duloxetine. In conclusion, Lu AA21004 was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder.
    International clinical psychopharmacology 05/2012; 27(4):215-23. DOI:10.1097/YIC.0b013e3283542457 · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is common and associated with poor patient life-quality and carer distress. The best evidence-based pharmacological treatments are antipsychotics which have limited benefits with increased morbidity and mortality. There are no memantine trials in clinically significant agitation but post-hoc analyses in other populations found reduced agitation. We tested the primary hypothesis, memantine is superior to placebo for clinically significant agitation, in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. We recruited 153 participants with AD and clinically significant agitation from care-homes or hospitals for a double-blind randomised-controlled trial and 149 people started the trial of memantine versus placebo. The primary outcome was 6 weeks mixed model autoregressive analysis of Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Secondary outcomes were: 12 weeks CMAI; 6 and 12 weeks Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPI), Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI-C), Standardised Mini Mental State Examination, Severe Impairment Battery. Using a mixed effects model we found no significant differences in the primary outcome, 6 weeks CMAI, between memantine and placebo (memantine lower -3.0; -8.3 to 2.2, p = 0.26); or 12 weeks CMAI; or CGI-C or adverse events at 6 or 12 weeks. NPI mean difference favoured memantine at weeks 6 (-6.9; -12.2 to -1.6; p = 0.012) and 12 (-9.6; -15.0 to -4.3 p = 0.0005). Memantine was significantly better than placebo for cognition. The main study limitation is that it still remains to be determined whether memantine has a role in milder agitation in AD. Memantine did not improve significant agitation in people with in moderate-to-severe AD. Future studies are urgently needed to test other pharmacological candidates in this group and memantine for neuropsychiatric symptoms. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00371059. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial 24953404.
    PLoS ONE 05/2012; 7(5):e35185. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0035185 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 05/2012; 27(5):439-42. DOI:10.1002/gps.2745 · 3.09 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
715.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2015
    • University College London
      • Mental Health Sciences Unit
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • London Research Institute
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • University of East Anglia
      Norwich, England, United Kingdom
  • 2009
    • The Bracton Centre, Oxleas NHS Trust
      Дартфорде, England, United Kingdom
  • 2004–2009
    • University of Kent
      • Kent Institute of Medicine and Health Sciences
      Cantorbery, England, United Kingdom
  • 2007
    • Kent Hospital
      Warwick, Rhode Island, United States
  • 2006
    • Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
      West Malling, England, United Kingdom
    • King's College London
      • Social Care Workforce Research Unit
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2000
    • Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1998–2000
    • UK society for behavioural medicine
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1992–1996
    • Middlesex University, UK
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1994–1995
    • The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust
      Harlow, England, United Kingdom
  • 1989–1991
    • The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom