Hung-Teh Kao

Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, United States

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Publications (22)123.05 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genomic and transcriptomic sequence data are essential tools for tackling ecological problems. Using an approach that combines next-generation sequencing, de novo transcriptome assembly, gene annotation and synthetic gene construction, we identify and cluster the protein families from Favia corals from the northern Red Sea. We obtained 80 million 75 bp paired-end cDNA reads from two Favia adult samples collected at 65 m (Fav1, Fav2) on the Illumina GA platform, and generated two de novo assemblies using ABySS and CAP3. After removing redundancy and filtering out low quality reads, our transcriptome datasets contained 58,268 (Fav1) and 62,469 (Fav2) contigs longer than 100 bp, with N50 values of 1,665 bp and 1,439 bp, respectively. Using the proteome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis as a reference, we were able to annotate almost 20% of each dataset using reciprocal homology searches. Homologous clustering of these annotated transcripts allowed us to divide them into 7,186 (Fav1) and 6,862 (Fav2) homologous transcript clusters (E-value <= 2e-30). Functional annotation categories were assigned to homologous clusters using the functional annotation of Nematostella vectensis. General annotation of the assembled transcripts was improved 1-3% using the Acropora digitifera proteome. In addition, we screened these transcript isoform clusters for fluorescent proteins (FPs) homologs and identified seven potential FP homologs in Fav1, and four in Fav2. These transcripts were validated as bona fide FP transcripts via robust fluorescence heterologous expression. Annotation of the assembled contigs revealed that 1.34% and 1.61% (in Fav1 and Fav2, respectively) of the total assembled contigs likely originated from the corals' algal symbiont, Symbiodinium spp. Here we present a study to identify the homologous transcript isoform clusters from the transcriptome of Favia corals using a far-related reference proteome. Furthermore, the symbiont-derived transcripts were isolated from the datasets and their contribution quantified. This is the first annotated transcriptome of the genus Favia, a major increase in genomics resources available in this important family of corals.
    BMC Genomics 08/2013; 14(1):546. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term sequelae of adverse early-life experiences have long been a focus in psychiatry, with a historic neurobiological emphasis on physiological systems that are demonstrably stress-responsive, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neuroimmune function. However, there has been increasing recognition in the general medical literature that such sequelae might encompass more pervasive alterations in health status and physiology. Recent findings in telomere biology have suggested a new avenue for exploring the adverse health effects of childhood maltreatment. Telomere length in proliferative tissues declines with cell replication and the effect can be accelerated by such factors as inflammation, oxidative stress, radiation, and toxins. Reduced telomere length, as a proxy for cellular aging, has been associated with numerous chronic somatic diseases that are generally considered to be diseases of aging, such as diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. More recently, shorter telomeres have been demonstrated in several psychiatric conditions, particularly depression. Sustained psychosocial stress of a variety of types in adulthood appears to be associated with shorter telomeres. Now, emerging work suggests a robust, and perhaps dose-dependent, relationship with early-life stress. These findings present new opportunities to reconceptualize the complex relationships between experience, physical and psychiatric disease, and aging.
    Biological psychiatry 07/2012; · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synapsin III was discovered in 1998, more than two decades after the first two synapsins (synapsins I and II) were identified. Although the biology of synapsin III is not as well understood as synapsins I and II, this gene is emerging as an important factor in the regulation of the early stages of neurodevelopment and dopaminergic neurotransmission, and in certain neuropsychiatric illnesses. Molecular genetic and clinical studies of synapsin III have determined that its neurodevelopmental effects are exerted at the levels of neurogenesis and axonogenesis. In vitro voltammetry studies have shown that synapsin III can control dopamine release in the striatum. Since dopaminergic dysfunction is implicated in many neuropsychiatric conditions, one may anticipate that polymorphisms in synapsin III can exert pervasive effects, especially since it is localized to extrasynaptic sites. Indeed, mutations in this gene have been identified in individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis. These and other findings indicate that the roles of synapsin III differ significantly from those of synapsins I and II. Here, we focus on the unique roles of the newest synapsin, and where relevant, compare and contrast these with the actions of synapsins I and II.
    Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology 07/2011; 22(4):416-24. · 6.20 Impact Factor
  • Biological psychiatry 08/2010; · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fluorescent proteins have become essential tools in molecular and biological applications. Here, we present a novel fluorescent protein isolated from warm water coral, Cyphastrea microphthalma. The protein, which we named vivid Verde fluorescent protein (VFP), matures readily at 37 degrees C and emits bright green light. Further characterizations revealed that VFP has a tendency to form dimers. By creating a homology model of VFP, based on the structure of the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, we were able to make mutations that alter the protein's oligomerization state. We present two proteins, mVFP and mVFP1, that are both exclusively monomeric, and one protein, dVFP, which is dimeric. We characterized the spectroscopic properties of VFP and its variants in comparison with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), a widely used variant of GFP. All the VFP variants are at least twice as bright as EGFP. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of the VFP variants in both in vitro and in vivo detection applications.
    FEBS Journal 03/2010; 277(8):1967-78. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism is associated with high rates of genomic aberrations, including chromosomal rearrangements and de novo copy-number variations. These observations are reminiscent of cancer, a disease where genomic rearrangements also play a role. We undertook a correlative epidemiological study to explore the possibility that shared risk factors might exist for autism and specific types of cancer. To determine if significant correlations exist between the prevalence of autism and the incidence of cancer, we obtained and analyzed state-wide data reported by age and gender throughout the United States. Autism data were obtained from the U.S. Department of Education via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (2000-2007, reported annually by age group) and cancer incidence data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (1999-2005). IDEA data were further subdivided depending on the method used to diagnose autism (DSM IV or the Code of Federal Regulations, using strict or expanded criteria). Spearman rank correlations were calculated for all possible pairwise combinations of annual autism rates and the incidence of specific cancers. Following this, Bonferroni's correction was applied to significance values. Two independent methods for determining an overall combined p-value based on dependent correlations were obtained for each set of calculations. High correlations were found between autism rates and the incidence of in situ breast cancer (p < or = 10(-10), modified inverse chi square, n = 16) using data from states that adhere strictly to the Code of Federal Regulations for diagnosing autism. By contrast, few significant correlations were observed between autism prevalence and the incidence of 23 other female and 22 male cancers. These findings suggest that there may be an association between autism and specific forms of cancer.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(2):e9372. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2010; 98(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psychological stress and trauma are risk factors for several medical and psychiatric illnesses. Recent studies have implicated advanced cellular aging as a potential mechanism of this association. Telomeres, DNA repeats that cap the ends of chromosomes and promote stability, shorten progressively with each cell division; their length is a marker of biological aging. Based on previous evidence linking psychosocial stress to shorter telomere length, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of childhood adversity on telomere length. Thirty-one adults with no current or past major Axis I psychiatric disorder participated. Subjects reported on their history of childhood maltreatment and telomere length was measured from DNA extracted from frozen whole blood using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Participants reporting a history of childhood maltreatment had significantly shorter telomeres than those who did not report a history of maltreatment. This finding was not due to effects of age, sex, smoking, body mass index, or other demographic factors. Analysis of subscales showed that both physical neglect and emotional neglect were significantly linked to telomere length. These results extend previous reports linking shortened leukocyte telomere length and caregiver stress to more remote stressful experiences in childhood and suggest that childhood maltreatment could influence cellular aging.
    Biological psychiatry 10/2009; 67(6):531-4. · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past decade, fluorescent proteins (FPs) have become ubiquitous tools in biological research. Yet, little is known about the natural function or evolution of this superfamily of proteins that originate from marine organisms. Using molecular phylogenetic analyses of 102 naturally occurring cyan fluorescent proteins, green fluorescent proteins, red fluorescent proteins, as well as the nonfluorescent (purple-blue) protein sequences (including new FPs from Lizard Island, Australia) derived from organisms with known geographic origin, we show that FPs consist of two distinct and novel regions that have evolved under opposite and sharply divergent evolutionary pressures. A central region is highly conserved, and although it contains the residues that form the chromophore, its evolution does not track with fluorescent color and evolves independently from the rest of the protein. By contrast, the regions enclosing this central region are under strong positive selection pressure to vary its sequence and yet segregate well with fluorescence color emission. We did not find a significant correlation between geographic location of the organism from which the FP was isolated and molecular evolution of the protein. These results define for the first time two distinct regions based on evolution for this highly compact protein. The findings have implications for more sophisticated bioengineering of this molecule as well as studies directed toward understanding the natural function of FPs.
    Molecular Biology and Evolution 09/2009; 26(12):2841-8. · 10.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.
    Biological Bulletin 11/2008; 215(2):143-54. · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously demonstrated that telomere length was markedly reduced in peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with schizophrenia. Since reduced telomere length can be caused by decreased telomerase activity, we quantitated basal telomerase activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes derived from individuals with schizophrenia (n=53), unaffected relatives (n=31) and unrelated controls (n=59). Telomerase activity varied greatly among individuals, suggesting that this enzymatic activity is affected by various factors. We observed a nominally significant decrease in telomerase activity among individuals with schizophrenia compared to unaffected individuals (unaffected relatives and unrelated controls). Further studies are needed to investigate the role of telomerase in schizophrenia.
    Schizophrenia Research 10/2008; 106(2-3):242-7. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-copy plasmids are useful for producing large quantities of plasmid DNA, but are generally inadequate for tightly regulating gene expression. Attempts to suppress expression of genes on high-copy plasmids often results in residual or "leaky" production of protein. For stringent regulation of gene expression, it is often necessary to excise the gene of interest and subclone it into a low-copy plasmid. Here, we report a dual plasmid technique that enables tight regulation of gene expression driven by the lac promoter in a high-copy vector. A series of plasmids with varying copies of the lacI(q) gene have been constructed to permit titration of the LacI protein. When a high-copy plasmid is transformed along with the appropriate lacI(q)-containing plasmid, tight gene regulation is achieved, thus eliminating the need to subclone genes into low-copy plasmids. In addition, we show that this dual plasmid technique enables high-copy gene expression of a protein lethal to Escherichia coli, the ccdB protein. In principle, this technique can be applied to any high-copy plasmid containing the popular pUC replication of origin and provides an easier means of obtaining rigid control over gene expression.
    Protein Expression and Purification 08/2008; 60(1):53-7. · 1.43 Impact Factor
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    Helen M Chao, Hung-Teh Kao, Barbara Porton
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    ABSTRACT: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been advanced as a candidate gene for schizophrenia by virtue of its effects on neurotransmitter systems that are dysregulated in psychiatric disorder and its involvement in the response to antipsychotic drugs. The extensively examined BDNF gene Val66Met (or rs6265) variant has been associated with schizophrenia, and studies have linked this polymorphism to brain morphology, cognitive function, and psychiatric symptoms in schizophrenia. Moreover the BDNF Val66Met variant has been reported to be associated with age of onset in schizophrenia. Genotyping of African-American subjects with schizophrenia for five BDNF coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms revealed variance only at the Val66Met allele. The results of statistical analyses indicate a relationship between the BDNF Val66Met genotype and the ages of first psychiatric hospitalization and first schizophrenia symptoms.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 07/2008; 147B(4):505-6. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synapsin III is a synaptic vesicle-associated protein that is expressed in cells of the subgranular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a brain region known to sustain substantial levels of neurogenesis into adulthood. Here we tested the hypothesis that synapsin III plays a role in adult neurogenesis with synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. Immunocytochemistry of the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus revealed that synapsin III colocalizes with markers of neural progenitor cell development (nestin, PSA-NCAM, NeuN, and Tuj1) but did not colocalize with markers of mitosis (Ki67 and PCNA). Because neurogenesis consists of a number of stages, the proliferation, survival, and differentiation of neural progenitor cells were systematically quantitated in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. We found a 30% decrease in proliferation and a 55% increase in survival of neural progenitor cells in synapsin III knockout mice. We also observed a 6% increase in the number of neural progenitor cells that differentiated into neurons. No difference in the volume of the dentate gyrus was observed between synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel role for synapsin III in regulating the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. These findings suggest a distinct function for this synaptic vesicle protein, in addition to its role in neurotransmission.
    The Journal of Comparative Neurology 05/2008; 507(6):1860-70. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Presynaptic terminals are specialized for mediating rapid fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) after calcium influx. The regulated trafficking of SVs likely results from a highly organized cytomatrix. How this cytomatrix links SVs, maintains them near the active zones (AZs) of release, and organizes docked SVs at the release sites is not fully understood. To analyze the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the presynaptic cytomatrix, electron tomography of presynaptic terminals contacting spines was performed in the stratum radiatum of the rat hippocampal CA1 area. To preserve the cytomatrix, hippocampal slices were immobilized using high-pressure freezing, followed by cryosubstitution and embedding. SVs are surrounded by a dense network of filaments. A given vesicle is connected to approximately 1.5 neighboring ones. SVs at the periphery of this network are also linked to the plasma membrane, by longer filaments. More of these filaments are found at the AZ. At the AZ, docked SVs are grouped around presynaptic densities. Filaments with adjacent SVs emerge from these densities. Immunogold localizations revealed that synapsin is located in the presynaptic bouton, whereas Bassoon and CAST (ERC2) are at focal points next to the AZ. In synapsin triple knock-out mice, the number of SVs is reduced by 63%, but the size of the boutons is reduced by only 18%, and the mean distance of SVs to the AZ is unchanged. This 3D analysis reveals the morphological constraints exerted by the presynaptic molecular scaffold. SVs are tightly interconnected in the axonal bouton, and this network is preferentially connected to the AZ.
    Journal of Neuroscience 07/2007; 27(26):6868-77. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To gain a better understanding of the natural function of fluorescent proteins, we have undertaken quantitative analyses of these proteins in a single species of coral, Montastraea cavernosa, residing around Turneffe atoll, on the Belizean Barrier Reef. We identified at least 10 members of a fluorescent protein family in this species, which consist of 4 distinct spectral classes. As much as a 10-fold change in the overall expression of fluorescent proteins was observed from specimen to specimen, suggesting that fluorescent proteins are dynamically regulated in response to environmental or physiological conditions. We found that the expression of some proteins was inversely correlated with depth, and that groups of proteins were coordinately expressed. There was no relationship between the expression of fluorescent proteins and the natural coloration of the Montastraea cavernosa specimens in this study. These findings have implications for current hypotheses regarding the properties and natural function of fluorescent proteins.
    Marine Biotechnology 01/2007; 9(6):733-46. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) enables the sensitive, high-throughput protein profiling of complex biological mixtures. In combination with bioinformatics, this technology has the potential to identify combinations of spectral peaks that can differentiate individuals with a particular disease from normal controls. SELDI-TOF-MS was used to screen postmortem tissue derived from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia (n = 34) and matched controls (n = 35), obtained from the Stanley Foundation Neuropathology Consortium. Tissue samples were homogenized in urea buffer, applied to four different chip arrays which possess different chromatographic surfaces, and analyzed using the Ciphergen ProteinChip Biomarkers System (Model PBS II). Protein expression profiles of the schizophrenia and control groups were compared and analyzed using the Ciphergen Express (CE) and Biomarker Patterns Software (BPS) package. We detected several protein peaks whose intensities differed between the schizophrenia and control groups to a highly significant degree. A combination of these peaks was capable of distinguishing between schizophrenia and controls with a sensitivity and specificity of about 70%. The classification model that distinguished schizophrenia from controls was complex, suggesting that the biochemical abnormalities underlying schizophrenia are heterogeneous. Our results suggest that SELDI-TOF-MS has the potential for distinguishing individuals with schizophrenia from normal controls and may eventually lead to a better understanding of the classification, diagnosis and pathogenesis of this disorder.
    Schizophrenia Research 07/2006; 84(2-3):204-13. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although synapsins are abundant synaptic vesicle proteins that are widely used as markers of presynaptic terminals, the mechanisms that target synapsins to presynaptic terminals have not been elucidated. We have addressed this question by imaging the targeting of green fluorescent protein-tagged synapsins in cultured hippocampal neurons. Whereas all synapsin isoforms targeted robustly to presynaptic terminals in wild-type neurons, synapsin Ib scarcely targeted in neurons in which all synapsins were knocked-out. Coexpression of other synapsin isoforms significantly strengthened the targeting of synapsin Ib in knock-out neurons, indicating that heterodimerization is required for synapsin Ib to target. Truncation mutagenesis revealed that synapsin Ia targets via distributed binding sites that include domains B, C, and E. Although domain A was not necessary for targeting, its presence enhanced targeting. Domain D inhibited targeting, but this inhibition was overcome by domain E. Thus, multiple intermolecular and intramolecular interactions are required for synapsins to target to presynaptic terminals.
    Journal of Neuroscience 05/2004; 24(14):3711-20. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined the distribution of synapsin III in the adult mouse brain. Expression of synapsin III was observed in puncta throughout the brain, but demonstrated greater regional variation than that of synapsins I or II. This punctate staining is typical for synaptic vesicle proteins located at nerve terminals. These findings are also consistent with the well-established role for synapsins in regulating neurotransmitter release. However, unexpectedly, synapsin III was also highly expressed in the cell body and processes of immature neurons in neurogenic regions of the adult brain, such as the hippocampal dentate gyrus, rostral migratory stream, and olfactory bulb. Many synapsin III-positive neurons also reacted with an antibody directed toward polysialylated-neuronal cell adhesion molecule, a marker of immature, migrating neurons. These results suggest that synapsin III may also play a role in adult neurogenesis.
    The Journal of Comparative Neurology 01/2003; 454(2):105-14. · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Barbara Porton, Hung-Teh Kao
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    ABSTRACT: Intracellular signaling pathways involved in neurite outgrowth have been extensively studied in a variety of cell systems. While most of these studies utilized continuous neuronal-like cell lines, fewer studies have been conducted in primary neuronal culture. One primary culture system that has recently been used to dissect the signaling pathways involved in axon guidance consists of spinal neurons derived from embryonic Xenopus laevis. In this study, we used Xenopus to study neurite outgrowth by treating neuronal cultures with pharmacological agents that activate or inhibit various protein kinases or that inhibit protein phosphatases. We found that agents which affected signaling via cAMP-dependent protein kinase, calmodulin, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, or protein phosphatases had effects on Xenopus neurite outgrowth that were similar to those reported in other primary neurons or in neuronal-like cell lines. However, agents which affected protein kinase C signaling had effects on Xenopus neurite outgrowth that were distinct from those reported in neuronal-like cell lines. Although continuous cell lines have several advantages for the dissection of signaling pathways involved in neurodevelopment, these observations underscore the importance of also using primary neurons to examine these pathways.
    Neurosignals 01/2003; 12(1):45-52. · 2.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

574 Citations
123.05 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2012
    • Butler Hospital
      Providence, Rhode Island, United States
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2007–2011
    • Brown University
      • Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
      Providence, RI, United States
  • 2007–2008
    • Nathan Kline Institute
      Orangeburg, New York, United States
  • 2003
    • Yale-New Haven Hospital
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
    • The Rockefeller University
      • Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
      New York City, NY, United States