Mohammed A Umar

Rakuno Gakuen University, Japan

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Publications (17)16.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Tramadol is an atypical opioid analgesic widely used in small animal practice. This study was designed to determine the effect of a single intravenous (IV) dose of tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice to determine the sevoflurane MAC with or without an administration of tramadol (4 mg/kg, IV) at 7 days interval. The sevoflurane MAC was determined using a tail clamp method in each dog ventilated with positive pressure ventilation. The tramadol administration produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC by 22.3 ± 12.2% (1.44 ± 0.28% with tramadol versus 1.86 ± 0.30% without tramadol, P=0.010). This MAC reduction had been determined from 122 ± 19 to 180 ± 41 min following the tramadol administration. During this period, the plasma concentrations of tramadol and its metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), decreased from 429 ± 64 to 332 ± 55 ng/ml and from 136 ± 24 to 114 ± 68 ng/ml, respectively, but these changes were not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and SpO(2) between the control and tramadol treatment. The dogs that received tramadol treatment sometimes breathed spontaneously. Therefore, their respiratory rates significantly increased, and PETCO(2) decreased during the MAC determination. In conclusion, the single IV dose of tramadol produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC in dogs.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 01/2013; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anesthetic and cardio-respiratory effects of medetomidine, lidocaine, butorphanol and propofol total intravenous anesthesia (MLBP-TIVA) were evaluated in horses undergoing an experimental surgery. Ten horses were pre-medicated with an intravenous injection (IV) of medetomidine (5 μg/kg) and butorphanol (20 μg/kg). Anesthesia was induced by administration of 1% propofol (3 mg/kg, IV) at a rate of 1 mg/kg/min (n=5, group-1) or 2% propofol administered at a rate of 6 mg/kg/min (n=5, group-2) following administration of lidocaine (1 mg/kg, IV) and then maintained by infusions of propofol, medetomidine (3.5 μg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr) and butorphanol (24 μg/kg/hr). The mean durations of anesthesia and propofol infusion rate required for maintaining surgical anesthesia were 130 ± 17 min and 0.10 ± 0.01 mg/kg/min in group-1 and 129 ± 14 min and 0.10 ± 0.02 mg/kg/min in group-2. Four in group-1 and 2 horses of group-2 paddled following recumbency during induction of anesthesia. The median quality scores (0: poor-4: excellent) for induction were 3 and for recovery (0: unable to stand-5: excellent) were 4 for both groups. During transition to anesthesia (the first 20-min period after the induction), it was uneventful in group-2 while all horses showed a light plane of anesthesia in group-1. The quality score (0: poor-3: excellent) for the transition to anesthesia in group-2 was significantly higher than in group-1 (median 3 versus 1, P=0.009). Heart rate and arterial blood pressure were maintained within acceptable ranges but hypercapnea occurred during anesthesia in both groups. In conclusion, MLBP-TIVA may provide clinically useful surgical anesthesia in horses. A rapid induction with propofol may improve the qualities of induction and transition to MLBP-TIVA.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 10/2012; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular effects of tramadol were evaluated in dogs anesthetized with sevoflurane. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice at 7 days interval. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was earlier determined in each dog. The dogs were then anesthetized with sevoflurane at 1.3 times of predetermined individual MAC and cardiovascular parameters were evaluated before (baseline) and after an intravenous injection of tramadol (4 mg/kg). The administration of tramadol produced a transient and mild increase in arterial blood pressure (ABP) (P=0.004) with prolonged increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) (P<0.0001). Compared with baseline value, mean ABP increased significantly at 5 min (119% of baseline value, P=0.003), 10 min (113%, P=0.027), and 15 min (111%, P=0.022). SVR also increased significantly at 5 min (128%, P<0.0001), 10 min (121%, P=0.026), 30 min (114%, P=0.025), 45 min (113%, P=0.025) and 60 min (112%, P=0.048). Plasma concentrations of tramadol were weakly correlated with the percentage changes in mean ABP (r=0.642, P<0.0001) and SVR (r=0.646, P<0.0001). There was no significant change in heart rate, cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, pulmonary arterial pressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In conclusion, the administration of tramadol produces a prolonged peripheral vascular constriction in dogs anesthetized with sevoflurane, which is accompanied with a transient and mild increase in arterial blood pressure. It also indicated that the degree of vasoconstriction might depend on the plasma concentration of tramadol.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 08/2011; 73(12):1603-9. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The bispectral index (BIS) was evaluated as an indicator of central nervous system (CNS) depression in horses anesthetized with propofol. Five non-premedicated horses were anesthetized with 7 mg/kg, IV propofol and the minimum infusion rate (MIR) of propofol required to maintain anesthesia was determined during intermittent positive pressure ventilation in each horse. The BIS was determined 20 min later and after stabilization at 2.0 MIR, 1.5 MIR, and 1.0 MIR. The BIS was also recorded after the cessation of propofol infusion when the horses regained spontaneous breathing and swallowing reflex. The MIR and plasma concentration (Cp) of propofol were 0.20 +/- 0.03 mg/kg/min and 17.5 +/- 4.0 microg/ml, respectively. The BIS value and Cp were 59 +/- 13 and 26.7 +/- 8.6 microg/ml at 2.0 MIR, 63 +/- 9 and 22.9 +/- 9.7 microg/ml at 1.5 MIR, 64 +/- 13 and 20.1 +/- 5.9 microg/ml at 1.0 MIR, 64 +/- 24 and 13.0 +/- 2.8 microg/ml at return of spontaneous breathing, and 91 +/- 4 and 11.0 +/- 3.4 microg/ml when the swallowing reflex returned, respectively. The BIS value was significantly less in anesthetized horses compared to horses once swallowing returned (p=0.025). The BIS value was significantly correlated with the propofol Cp (r=-0.625, p=0.001). There was not a significant difference in the BIS values during the MIR multiples of propofol. The BIS was a useful indicator of awakening but did not indicate the degree of CNS depression during propofol-anesthesia in horses.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 11/2009; 71(11):1465-71. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalation anesthetic decreases with increasing age. However, there is limited information regarding the effect of age on MAC in dogs. This study was designed to determine the effect of age on sevoflurane MAC in dogs. MAC was determined in 6 young (2 years old) and 6 old beagle dogs (8 to 10 years old) under artificial ventilation. Anesthesia was induced via mask induction and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC was determined by using a tail clamp method. The sevoflurane MAC for the older dogs was significantly less than that for the younger dogs (1.86 +/- 0.29% vs 2.25 +/- 0.15%, P=0.007). The MAC of sevoflurane is profoundly affected by age in dogs.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 11/2009; 71(11):1509-12. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most methods for determining cardiac output (CO) have limited application in clinical practice due to the invasive techniques required. This study compared the thermodilution technique (TDCO) with three noninvasive methods for determining CO in anesthetized dogs: transthoracic bioimpedance (BICO), partial CO2 rebreathing (NICO), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEECO). TDCO was compared to BICO, NICO, and TEECO in six adult sevoflurane anesthetized beagle dogs (9.1–13.0 kg). All dogs were administered midazolam [0.3 mg kg−1, intravenously (IV)] and butorphanol (0.1 mg kg−1 IV), followed by ketamine (5.0 mg kg–1 IV) and sevoflurane in nitrous oxide (1 L minute–1) and oxygen (1 L minute–1) and mechanically ventilated. Dogs were maintained at 2.2% end-tidal sevoflurane (ETsev) concentration for instrumentation and baseline measurements. Low (5.0% ETsev), intermediate (3.3% ETsev), and high cardiac output values were achieved by varying the end-tidal sevoflurane concentration and the administration of dobutamine (3–10 g kg–1 minute–1 and 2.2% ETsev). A minimum of thirty data sets was obtained for each comparison. The correlation coefficients when compared to TDCO were 0.684 for BICO (p < 0.0001), 0.883 for NICO (p < 0.0001), and 0.991 for TEECO (p < 0.0001). Cardiac output values ranged 50–444 mL kg–1 minute–1 for TDCO, 100–253 mL kg–1 minute–1 for BICO, 64–214 mL kg–1 minute–1 for NICO, and 52–401 mL kg–1 minute–1 for TEECO. The differences when compared to TDCO ranged – 62–235 mL kg−1minute−1 for BICO, 18–220 mL kg−1 minute−1 for NICO, and – 35–32 mL kg–1 minute–1 for TEECO. Differences were maximum at the highest CO in BICO and NICO. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BICO and NICO underestimate CO in sevoflurane anesthetized dogs. TEECO is a viable noninvasive method for determining CO in sevoflurane anesthetized dogs.
    Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 06/2008; 32(4):13 - 14. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sparing effects of carprofen and meloxicam with or without butorphanol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane were determined in 6 dogs. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC was determined by use of a tail clamp method. The dogs were administered a subcutaneous injection of carprofen (4 mg/kg) or meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg), or no medication (control) one hour prior to induction of anesthesia. Following the initial determination of MAC, butorphanol (0.3 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, and MAC was determined again. The sevoflurane MACs for carprofen alone (2.10 +/- 0.26%) and meloxicam alone (2.06 +/- 0.20%) were significantly less than the control (2.39 +/- 0.26%). The sevoflurane MACs for the combination of carprofen with butorphanol (1.78 +/- 0.20%) and meloxicam with butorphanol (1.66 +/- 0.29%) were also significantly less than the control value after the administration of butorphanol (2.12 +/- 0.28%). The sevoflurane sparing effects of the combinations of carprofen with butorphanol and meloxicam with butorphanol were additive.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 02/2008; 70(1):29-35. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Minimally invasive cardiac output was determined using transthoracic bioimpedance (BICO), partial carbon dioxide rebreathing (NICO) and transesophageal Doppler echocardiography (TEECO) and compared to thermodilution (TDCO) in 6 beagle dogs. The dogs were 2 years old, weigh between 9.1-13.0 kg and were anesthetized with nitrous oxide-oxygen-sevoflurane. All dogs were administered a neuromuscular blocking drug and artificially ventilated during anesthesia. Thirty paired measurements of TDCO and each non-invasive method were collected during low, intermediate, and high values of cardiac output achieved by varying the depth of anesthesia and the administration of dobutamine. Cardiac output values ranged from 1.10-2.50 L/min for BICO compared to 0.81-4.88 L/min for TDCO; 0.70-2.60 L/min for NICO compared to 0.89-4.45 L/min for TDCO; and 0.59-4.37 L/min for TEECO compared to 0.57-4.15 L/min for TDCO. The limits of agreement and percentage error were -0.58 +/- 1.56 L/min and +/- 75.4% for BICO, -1.04 +/- 1.08 L/min and +/- 56.0% for NICO, and 0.03 +/- 0.26 L/min and +/- 12.3% for TEECO compared to TDCO. In conclusion, TEECO provided the best agreement to TDCO in sevoflurane anesthetized beagle dogs.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 02/2007; 69(1):43-7. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of midazolam, ketamine and medetomidine for total intravenous anesthesia (MKM-TIVA) were evaluated in 14 horses. Horses were administered medetomidine 5 microg/kg intravenously as pre-anesthetic medication and anesthetized with an intravenous injection of ketamine 2.5 mg/kg and midazolam 0.04 mg/kg followed by the infusion of MKM-drug combination (midazolam 0.8 mg/ml-ketamine 40 mg/ml-medetomidine 0.1 mg/ml). Nine stallions (3 thoroughbred and 6 draft horses) were castrated during infusion of MKM-drug combination. The average duration of anesthesia was 38 +/- 8 min and infusion rate of MKM-drug combination was 0.091 +/- 0.021 ml/kg/hr. Time to standing after discontinuing MKM-TIVA was 33 +/- 13 min. The quality of recovery from anesthesia was satisfactory in 3 horses and good in 6 horses. An additional 5 healthy thoroughbred horses were anesthetized with MKM- TIVA in order to assess cardiopulmonary effects. These 5 horses were anesthetized for 60 min and administered MKM-drug combination at 0.1 ml/kg/hr. Cardiac output and cardiac index decreased to 70-80%, stroke volume increased to 110% and systemic vascular resistance increased to 130% of baseline value. The partial pressure of arterial blood carbon dioxide was maintained at approximately 50 mmHg while the arterial partial pressure of oxygen pressure decreased to 50-60 mmHg. MKM-TIVA provides clinically acceptable general anesthesia with mild cardiopulmonary depression in horses. Inspired air should be supplemented with oxygen to prevent hypoxemia during MKM-TIVA.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 02/2007; 69(1):7-13. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the cardiovascular effects of total IV anesthesia with propofol (P-TIVA) or ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses. 5 Thoroughbreds. Horses were anesthetized twice for 4 hours, once with P-TIVA and once with KMP-TIVA. Horses were medicated with medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg, IV) and anesthetized with ketamine (2.5 mg/kg, IV) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg, IV). After receiving a loading dose of propofol (0.5 mg/kg, IV), anesthesia was maintained with a constant rate infusion of propofol (0.22 mg/kg/min) for P-TIVA or with a constant rate infusion of propofol (0.14 mg/kg/min), ketamine (1 mg/kg/h), and medetomidine (0.00125 mg/kg/h) for KMP-TIVA. Ventilation was artificially controlled throughout anesthesia. Cardiovascular measurements were determined before medication and every 30 minutes during anesthesia, and recovery from anesthesia was scored. Cardiovascular function was maintained within acceptable limits during P-TIVA and KMP-TIVA. Heart rate ranged from 30 to 40 beats/min, and mean arterial blood pressure was > 90 mm Hg in all horses during anesthesia. Heart rate was lower in horses anesthetized with KMP-TIVA, compared with P-TIVA. Cardiac index decreased significantly, reaching minimum values (65% of baseline values) at 90 minutes during KMP-TIVA, whereas cardiac index was maintained between 80% and 90% of baseline values during P-TIVA. Stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance were similarly maintained during both methods of anesthesia. With P-TIVA, some spontaneous limb movements occurred, whereas with KMP-TIVA, no movements were observed. Cardiovascular measurements remained within acceptable values in artificially ventilated horses during P-TIVA or KMP-TIVA. Decreased cardiac output associated with KMP-TIVA was primarily the result of decreases in heart rate.
    American Journal of Veterinary Research 02/2007; 68(2):121-7. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective-To compare the anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of total IV anesthesia with propofol (P-TIVA) or a ketamine-medetomidine-propofol combination (KMP-TIVA) in horses. Design-Randomized experimental trial. Animals-12 horses. Procedure-Horses received medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg [0.002 mg/lb], IV). Anesthesia was induced with midazolam (0.04 mg/kg [0.018 mg/lb], IV) and ketamine (2.5 mg/kg [1.14 mg/lb], IV). All horses received a loading dose of propofol (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], IV), and 6 horses underwent P-TIVA (propofol infusion). Six horses underwent KMP-TIVA (ketamine [1 mg/kg/h {0.45 mg/lb/h}] and medetomidine [0.00125 mg/kg/h {0.0006 mg/lb/h}] infusion; the rate of propofol infusion was adjusted to maintain anesthesia). Arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored. Qualities of anesthetic induction, transition to TIVA, and maintenance of and recovery from anesthesia were evaluated. Results-Administration of KMP IV provided satisfactory anesthesia in horses. Compared with the P-TIVA group, the propofol infusion rate was significantly less in horses undergoing KMP-TIVA (0.14 +/- 0.02 mg/kg/min [0.064 +/- 0.009 mg/lb/min] vs 0.22 +/- 0.03 mg/kg/min [0.1 +/- 0.014 mg/lb/min]). In the KMP-TIVA and P-TIVA groups, anesthesia time was 115 +/- 17 minutes and 112 +/- 11 minutes, respectively, and heart rate and arterial blood pressure were maintained within acceptable limits. There was no significant difference in time to standing after cessation of anesthesia between groups. Recovery from KMP-TIVA and P-TIVA was considered good and satisfactory, respectively. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-In horses, KMP-TIVA and P-TIVA provided clinically useful anesthesia; the ketamine-medetomidine infusion provided a sparing effect on propofol requirement for maintaining anesthesia.
    Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 05/2006; 228(8):1221-7. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The anesthetic sparring and cardiovascular effects produced by midazolam 0.8 mg/ml-ketamine 40 mg/ml-medetomidine 0.05 mg/ml (0.025 ml/kg/hr) drug infusion during sevoflurane in oxygen (MKM-OS) anesthesia was determined in healthy horses. The anesthetic sparring effects of MKM-OS were assessed in 6 healthy thoroughbred horses in which the right carotid artery was surgically relocated to a subcutaneous position. All horses were intubated and ventilated with oxygen using intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). The end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane (ET(SEV)) required to maintain surgical anesthesia was approximately 1.7%. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure averaged 23-41 beats/min and 70-112 mmHg, respectively. All horses stood between 23-44 min after the cessation of all anesthetic drugs. The cardiovascular effects of MKM-OS anesthesia were evaluated in 5 healthy thoroughbred horses ventilated using IPPV. Anesthesia was maintained for 4 hr at an ET(SEV) of 1.7%. Each horse was studied during left lateral (LR) and dorsal recumbency (DR) with a minimum interval between evaluations of 1 month. Cardiac output and cardiac index were maintained between 70-80% of baseline values during LR and 65-70% of baseline values during DR. Stroke volume was maintained between 75-85% of baseline values during LR and 60-70% of baseline values during DR. Systemic vascular resistance was not different from baseline values regardless of position. MKM-OS anesthesia may be useful for prolonged equine surgery because of its minimal cardiovascular depression in both of lateral and dorsal recumbency.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 05/2005; 67(4):379-84. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Axial correction was performed surgically in two miniature dachshunds presenting with lateral patellar dislocation and limping caused by pes varus. Pes varus had resulted from asymmetric closure of the physis of the distal tibia. Prior to surgery, osteotomy was simulated by measuring X-ray films to determine the distance required for the wedge opening. Transverse-opening wedge osteotomy was performed on the medial side of the distal tibia, and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) was inserted in a wedge shape into the area created by the cuneiform osteotomy. Finally, the tibia was fixed by a veterinary 1.5/2.0-mm T-plate. Both dogs were able to walk a few days after surgery, and the lateral dislocation of the patella normalized almost completely in about one month. At two months, X-ray films showed that the implant had remained in position without any dislocation, and the beta-TCP had fused with the surrounding bone.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 05/2005; 67(4):437-40. · 0.88 Impact Factor
  • Japanese Journal of Veterinary Anesthesia & Surgery 01/2005; 36(3):55-61.
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    ABSTRACT: MKM–OS anesthesia provides general anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in experimental horses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of MKM–OS anesthesia in clinical cases. Sixty-eight horses were anesthetized with MKM–OS anesthesia for selective or emergency surgery. The horse physical status was categorized based upon the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification scheme. Forty-four horses were classified as ASA I or II (low-risk; 30 soft tissue, eight ophthalmic, and six orthopedic surgeries) and 24 horses were classified as ASA III to V (high-risk; 24 emergency colic surgeries). All horses were administered medetomidine (0.005 mg kg–1 IV) as premedication and anesthetized with ketamine (2.5 mg kg–1 IV) and midazolam (0.04 mg kg–1 IV). The horses were orotracheally intubated and connected to a large animal breathing circuit that delivered oxygen-sevoflurane and administered the midazolam (0.8 mg mL–1)-ketamine (40 mg mL–1)-medetomidine (0.05 mg mL–1) drug combination at a rate of 0.025 mL kg–1 hour–1. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling the dial setting of the sevoflurane vaporizer and achieved by delivering 1.6–1.8% of end-tidal sevoflurane concentration. All horses were mechanically ventilated during anesthesia. Hypercapnia and hypoxia were not sufficiently improved in high-risk horses (PaCO2; low-risk 45–53 mm Hg versus high-risk 56–60 mm Hg, p
    Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 01/2005; 32(4):19-19. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Propofol is a potentially useful intravenous anesthetic agent for total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in horses. The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of TIVA following the administration of propofol alone(P–TIVA) and ketamine–medetomidine–propofol (KM–P–TIVA) in adult horses. The carotid artery was translocated to a subcutaneous position during TIVA with P–TIVA (n = 6) or KM–P–TIVA (n = 6). All horses were premedicated with medetomidine [0.005 mg kg–1, intravenously (IV)]. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam (0.04 mg kg–1 IV) and ketamine (2.5 mg kg IV). All horses were orotracheally intubated and breathed 100% oxygen. The KM drug combination (ketamine 40 mg mL–1 and medetomidine 0.05 mg mL–1) was infused at a rate of 0.025 mL kg–1 hour–1. Subsequently, a loading dose of propofol (0.5 mg kg–1, bolus IV) was administered to all horses; surgical anesthesia (determined by horse response to incision and surgical manipulation, positive response being purposeful or spontaneous movement of limbs or head) was maintained by varying the propofol infusion rate as needed. Arterial blood pressure and HR were also monitored. Both methods of producing TIVA provided excellent general anesthesia for the surgical procedure. Anesthesia time was 115 ± 17 (mean ± SD) and 112 ± 11 minutes in horses anesthetized with KM–P–TIVA and P–TIVA, respectively. The infusion rate of propofol required to maintain surgical anesthesia with KM–P–TIVA was significantly less than for P–TIVA (mean infusion rate of propofol during anesthesia; KM–P–TIVA 0.15 0.02 P–TIVA 0.23 ± 0.03 mg kg–1 minute–1, p = 0.004). Apnea occurred in all horses lasting 1–2 minutes and intermittent positive pressure ventilation was started. Cardiovascular function was maintained during both methods of producing TIVA. There were no differences in the time to standing after the cessation of anesthesia (KM–P–TIVA 62 ± 10 minutes versus P–TIVA 87 ± 36 minutes, p = 0.150). The quality of recovery was good in KM–P–TIVA and satisfactory in P–TIVA. KM–P–TIVA and P–TIVA produced clinically useful general anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression. Positive pressure ventilation was required to treat respiratory depression. Respiratory depression and apnea must be considered prior to the use of propofol in the horse.
    Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 01/2005; 32(4):18-19. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Screw and laser (SL) column by making screw threads and forming small holes using laser irradiation on the base metal and conventional beads coating (BC) columns were embedded into the shaft of canine femurs, and compared the implant fixation to the host bone. The interfacial strength in SL columns was almost equivalent as BC columns, and bone-column contact rate was higher than BC columns significantly at twelve weeks after implantation. The newly devised SL surface had almost equivalent bone fixation strength comparable to the conventional BC surface. Also, this surface should provide a useful porous surface for use in artificial joints since there is no risk of surface structure detachment.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 04/2004; 66(3):315-8. · 0.88 Impact Factor