Goretti Sauca

Consorci Sanitari del Maresme, Mataró, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (20)59.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a serious health problem in children and adults, and causes almost 1 million childhood deaths worldwide every year [1]. Streptococcus pneumoniae usually colonizes the nasopharynx of healthy children but is less frequently found as a colonizer in adults. It is estimated that most children are colonized by pneumococcus at least once during the first 2 years of life and nasopharyngeal colonization is the first step towards development of mucosal and invasive diseases [2]. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 03/2014; · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catheter sepsis is a constant and serious problem in our hospitals for the cost it generates, both in terms of morbidity and economics. It's becoming more frequent also in peripherally inserted catheters. Our study aims to know the importance and characteristics of peripheral venous catheter bacteremia in a general hospital. Prospective and comparative analysis of all episodes of central and peripheral venous catheter-related bacteraemia, in 2009. Twenty-eight episodes of catheter-related bacteraemia in a total of 25 patients. Sixteen episodes originated in central catheter (57.2%), 11 in peripheral (39.3%) and 1 in peripherally inserted central catheter (3.5%). Two cases of exitus directly related to the peripheral catheter infection. Etiology: 13 episodes of S. aureus (3 MRSA), including 8 in peripheral catheter (8/13, 61.5%), 12 episodes of plasma coagulase negative staphylococcus, including 2 in peripheral catheter (2/12, 16.6%). Peripheral catheter-related bacteraemia is an emerging health problem with important clinical and prognostic connotations for patients. It is necessary continuous training on correct handling measures to prevent intravascular catheters infections including peripheral catheters in every hospital ward.
    Revista espanola de quimioterapia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Quimioterapia 06/2012; 25(2):129-33. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Respiratory infection is the most common cause for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD). The aim of this work was to study the etiology of the respiratory infection in order to assess the usefulness of the clinical and analytical parameters used for COPD identification. We included 132 patients over a period of 2 years. The etiology of the respiratory infection was studied by conventional sputum, paired serology tests for atypical bacteria, and viral diagnostic techniques (immunochromatography, immunofluorescence, cell culture, and molecular biology techniques). We grouped the patients into four groups based on the pathogens isolated (bacterial versus. viral, known etiology versus unknown etiology) and compared the groups. A pathogen was identified in 48 patients. The pathogen was identified through sputum culture in 34 patients, seroconversion in three patients, and a positive result from viral techniques in 14 patients. No significant differences in identifying etiology were observed in the clinical and analytical parameters within the different groups. The most cost-effective tests were the sputum test and the polymerase chain reaction. Based on our experience, clinical and analytical parameters are not useful for the etiological identification of COPD exacerbations. Diagnosing COPD exacerbation is difficult, with the conventional sputum test for bacterial etiology and molecular biology techniques for viral etiology providing the most profitability. Further studies are necessary to identify respiratory syndromes or analytical parameters that can be used to identify the etiology of new AE-COPD cases without the laborious diagnostic techniques.
    International Journal of COPD 01/2012; 7:327-35.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to learn the serotype distribution and clonal composition of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children and adults in Spain before the introduction of new 10-valent (PCV10) and 13-valent (PCV13) conjugate vaccines. This is a 1-year prospective study including all patients with culture-proved IPD admitted to 30 medical centers in Catalonia, Spain, during the year 2009. A total of 614 episodes of IPD occurred in 612 patients. The rates of IPD were highest in children aged <24 months and adults >64 years (64.5 and 44.7 per 100,000 population). The burden of disease was mainly due to pneumonia in all age ranges. 609 of 614 strains were serotyped and 47 different serotypes were found. Among the 609 IPD cases with known serotype, 12.2% were caused by PCV7 serotypes, 51% by PCV10 serotypes, and 71.7% by PCV13 serotypes. 608 of 614 isolates were characterized by MLST. The main clonal types detected were ST306, CC191 and CC230. PCV13 conjugate vaccine offers good coverage against IPD in Catalonia, Spain. However, the high genetic diversity of pneumococci highlights the importance of molecular surveillance systems for monitoring IPD during the vaccination period. This study shows that 13-valent conjugate vaccine offers good coverage against invasive pneumococcal disease in children and adults in Spain. However, the high genetic diversity of pneumococci highlights the importance of molecular surveillance systems for monitoring IPD during the vaccination period.
    The Journal of infection 06/2011; 63(2):151-62. · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Disinfectable needle-free closed connectors were designed to avoid needle-stick injuries and to be easily disinfected before handling. Workloads or lack of knowledge, however, could impede the correct handling of these devices, allowing endoluminal catheter colonization. The aim of our study was to assess the barrier effect of different disinfectable needle-free closed connectors during correct and incorrect handling using an experimental model. We used a model consisting of a blood culture bottle with a peripheral venous catheter inserted under sterile conditions. Three different disinfectable needle-free closed connectors with different valve designs (microClave, Bionector, and Smartsite plus) were used to close the catheters. The external surfaces of the disinfectable needle-free closed connectors were contaminated with different concentrations of a Staphylococcus epidermidis culture broth. After contamination, 10 units of each connector and each concentration were assigned to the correct handling group (cleaned with 70% ethylic alcohol before handling) and the same number to the incorrect handling group (handled without disinfection) with a total of 180 bottles. Increases in concentrations of external contamination and incorrect handling of the connectors resulted in an increase in connectors' permeability to the pass of microorganisms to the endoluminal way. MicroClave proved the best barrier in the experimental conditions described. The barrier effect of disinfectable needle-free closed connectors is adversely affected by incorrect handling, the quantity of external valve colonization, and the valve design.
    Critical care medicine 10/2008; 36(9):2558-61. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Needleless valve connectors were introduced to avoid needlestick injuries in healthcare workers but some concerns exist about their microbiological safety. A randomised controlled trial was performed to assess hub colonisation affecting positive-pressure valve connectors (PPVCs) compared to conventional caps used for radial arterial catheters inserted into critically ill patients. Patients were randomly assigned either to the PPVC (Smartsite Plus positive bolus valve) or to the conventional cap group. Only catheters inserted for >24h were analysed. Of 100 consecutive arterial lines, 80 were inserted for >24h (mean insertion duration 5.8 days), 41 in the PPVC group and 39 in the conventional cap group. Catheter hubs were colonised in eight cases in the control group (20.5%) and in one case in the PPVC group (2.4%). Hub colonisation was caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci in all cases. No attributable bacteraemia was observed. In multivariate analysis, PPVC (odds ratio: 0.09; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.79; P=0.03) and use of the line for continuous haemodynamic monitoring (0.16; 0.03-0.89; P=0.037) were independently associated with a lower incidence of hub colonisation.
    Journal of Hospital Infection 10/2008; 70(4):341-5. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A few population-based studies assessing the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in both hospitalized and ambulatory patients, with special emphasis on the etiologic role of viral infections, have been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess microbiological differences according to initial site of care in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We studied 496 patients > 14 years of age collected from the study samples of three population-based studies carried out in the same geographical area ("Maresme" region in the Mediterranean coast in Barcelona, Spain) with the same methodology over an 8-year period (1987-1995). Fifty-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 44% were treated at home. Of the 474 patients with etiological evaluation, 195 patients had an identifiable etiology (overall diagnostic yield 41%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common causative organism. Viral infection was diagnosed in 26.5% of hospitalized patients vs. 13.2% of ambulatory patients (P=0.03). Twenty-five percent of the 68 patients with documented etiology treated at home had Chlamydia pneumoniae infection compared with 14.3% of those treated in the hospital. Ten percent of hospitalized patients had pneumonia caused by two pathogens compared with 9.7% of ambulatory patients. The association of viruses and bacteria was the most frequent cause of dual infection (79% inpatients, 67% outpatients). This study has provided information on etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients and in patients treated at home. A considerable proportion of patients had viral pneumonia, frequently requiring hospital admission for inpatient care.
    Respiratory Medicine 11/2007; 101(10):2168-75. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features and outcome of children younger than 15 years with malaria in our hospital. A retrospective case review of all children admitted to our hospital with malaria between 1997 and 2005 was performed. The following epidemiological data were analyzed: age, sex, nationality of the child and of the family, country and date of trip, chemoprophylaxis used, clinical features, laboratory parameters (hemogram and biochemistry), type of plasmodium and degree of parasitization, treatment, associated diseases, length of hospital stay, and outcome. A total of 24 children (16 boys) were diagnosed (median age, 6.5 years). All of the patients were immigrants or were the children of sub-Saharian immigrants. Thirteen patients had traveled to a malaria-endemic country during the summer holidays. Eleven children started chemoprophylaxis, but only two completed the whole course. The most common symptoms were fever (21 patients) and gastrointestinal symptoms (16 patients). Nineteen patients had anemia and six had thrombocytopenia. The most common species identified was Plasmodium falciparum (19 patients). After treatment, outcome was satisfactory in 21 patients. One patient had recurrence at 3 months, another showed sequelae, and one died after 30 days. Most children with imported malaria in our area were immigrants or the children of immigrants. Although treatment response is usually satisfactory, rapid diagnosis of this disease in the emergency room of any hospital capable of treating these patients is required.
    Anales de Pediatría 10/2007; 67(3):199-205. · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study compares the risk factors, presentation and outcome of community-acquired Legionella pneumophila pneumonia in 138 sporadic-case patients (1994-2004) and 113 outbreak-case patients (2002) treated in two hospitals in Catalonia (Spain) since urinary antigen assays were adopted. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to compare epidemiological and clinical features, blood chemistry values, radiological findings and outcome of sporadic and epidemic legionnaires' disease. Univariate analysis showed that male sex, chronic lung disease, HIV infection and immunosuppressive therapy prevailed in sporadic cases. Presentation with respiratory symptoms, confusion and blood chemistry alterations, such as hyponatraemia, aspartate aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen elevation, and partial pressure of oxygen P(O)(2) <7.98 KPa (60 mmHg) were also more frequent in sporadic cases, while headache prevailed in outbreak cases. Sporadic cases had a greater delay in treatment, were more severe and had a worse outcome than epidemic cases. Multivariate analysis showed significant differences in sex, chronic lung disease, HIV infection and headache. The clinical and outcome differences between the two groups may be explained by the detection of milder forms of legionnaires' disease, the earlier treatment and the lower severity of underlying disease in the outbreak cases.
    European Respiratory Journal 01/2007; 29(1):138-42. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features and outcome of children younger than 15 years with malaria in our hospital. Material and methods A retrospective case review of all children admitted to our hospital with malaria between 1997 and 2005 was performed. The following epidemiological data were analyzed: age, sex, nationality of the child and of the family, country and date of trip, chemoprophylaxis used, clinical features, laboratory parameters (hemogram and biochemistry), type of plasmodium and degree of parasitization, treatment, associated diseases, length of hospital stay, and outcome. Results A total of 24 children (16 boys) were diagnosed (median age, 6.5 years). All of the patients were immigrants or were the children of sub-Saharian immigrants. Thirteen patients had traveled to a malaria-endemic country during the summer holidays. Eleven children started chemoprophylaxis, but only two completed the whole course. The most common symptoms were fever (21 patients) and gastrointestinal symptoms (16 patients). Nineteen patients had anemia and six had thrombocytopenia. The most common species identified was Plasmodium falciparum (19 patients). After treatment, outcome was satisfactory in 21 patients. One patient had recurrence at 3 months, another showed sequelae, and one died after 30 days. Conclusions Most children with imported malaria in our area were immigrants or the children of immigrants. Although treatment response is usually satisfactory, rapid diagnosis of this disease in the emergency room of any hospital capable of treating these patients is required.
    Anales De Pediatria - AN PEDIATR. 01/2007; 67(3):199-205.
  • Intensive Care Medicine 10/2006; 32(9):1442-3. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A community outbreak of Legionella pneumonia in the district of Cerdanyola, Mataró (Catalonia, Spain) was investigated in an epidemiological, environmental and molecular study. Each patient was interviewed to ascertain personal risk-factors and the clinical and epidemiological data. Isolates of Legionella from patients and water samples were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Between 7 August and 25 August 2002, 113 cases of Legionella pneumonia fulfilling the outbreak case definition criteria were reported, with 84 (74%) cases being located within a 500-m radius of the suspected cooling tower source. In this area, the relative risk of being infected was 54.6 (95% CI 25.3-118.1) compared with individuals living far from the cooling tower. Considering the population residing in the Cerdanyola district (28,256 inhabitants) as a reference population, the attack rate for the outbreak was 399.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants, and the case fatality rate was 1.8%. A single DNA subtype was observed among the ten clinical isolates, and one of the subtypes from the cooling tower matched exactly with the clinical subtype. Nine days after closing the cooling tower, new cases of pneumonia caused by Legionella ceased to appear. The epidemiological features of the outbreak, and the microbiological and molecular investigations, implicated the cooling tower as the source of infection.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 08/2006; 12(7):642-7. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the usefulness of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in the diagnosis and treatment approach of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Population-based case-control study. A mixed residential-industrial urban area of 74,368 adult inhabitants in the Maresme region (Barcelona, Spain). From December 1993 to November 1995, all subjects who were > 14 years of age, were living in the area, and had received a diagnosis of CAP, which had been confirmed by chest radiographs and compatible clinical outcome, were registered. Patients from residential care facilities were excluded. Serum samples were assayed for CRP in the acute phase of the disease. Data from 201 patients with CAP were compared with 84 healthy control subjects matched by age, sex, and municipality, as well as with 25 patients with initially suspected pneumonia that was not confirmed at follow-up. Median CRP levels were 110.7, 1.9, and 31.9 mg/L, respectively. The thresholds of the test for discriminating among these three groups of subjects were 11.0 and 33.15 mg/L. Eighty-nine patients (44.8%) had an identifiable etiology. The most common pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae, viruses, and Chlamydia pneumoniae, followed by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii. There were statistically significant differences in the median CRP levels in pneumococcal (166.0 mg/L) and L pneumophila (178.0 mg/L) etiologies compared to other causative pathogens. Lower levels of CRP were found in pneumonia caused by viruses and C burnetii as well as in negative microbiological findings. The median CRP levels in hospitalized patients were significantly higher than in outpatients (132.0 vs 76.9 mg/L, respectively; p < 0.001). Considering a cut point of 106 mg/L in men and 110 mg/L in women for deciding about the appropriateness of inpatient care, CRP levels showed a sensitivity of 80.51% and a specificity of 80.72%. Serum CRP level is a useful marker for establishing the diagnosis of CAP in adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections. High CRP values are especially high in patients with pneumonias caused by S pneumoniae or L pneumophila. Moreover, high CRP values are suggestive of severity, which may be of value in deciding about the appropriateness of inpatient care.
    Chest 04/2004; 125(4):1335-42. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a disinfectable needle-free connector in reducing the pass of micro-organisms to the lumen of the catheter. A prospective, controlled, experimental trial was performed in which a laboratory model simulated the insertion of a peripheral venous catheter. Catheters inserted in sterile conditions in a hemoculture bottle were closed with the disinfectable needle-free connector (study group) or with a cap (control group). After 9 days of contamination and manipulation of the connector and cap external surfaces, 100% of bottles in the control group were contaminated whereas 60% remained sterile in the study group. The disinfectable needle-free connector showed more resistance to the pass of microorganisms than the conventional cap according to our experimental model.
    American Journal of Infection Control 01/2004; 31(8):462-4. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hookworm infection is a worldwide intestinal parasitic disease affecting more than one billion people. It represents an important public health problem in rural areas of developing countries. In our environment, it is generally considered an imported disease due to the immigration process. Retrospective observational study of African immigrants diagnosed with hookworm infection at the Immigration and Tropical Medicine Unit of the Hospital of Mataró over the period 1984-1999. We identified 285 patients, mainly young males, from Gambia or Senegal, with a precarious job who had arrived in Spain 3 years earlier or less. Abdominal pain was the commonest reason for consultation (28.8%) cases. Non digestive symptoms were 35.6% and 4.6% remained assymptomatic. 60% had a concomitant infectious disease. Laboratory tests showed iron-deficiency anemia in 28.4% and eosinophilia in 52.3%. 70% of patients did not come to visit after treatment. Microbiologic stool examination is recommended as part of the health assessment of immigrants from countries where hookworm infection is highly prevalent, even in the absence of abdominal symptoms or abnormalities of the red and white blood series.
    Medicina Clínica 07/2003; 121(4):139-41. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objective Hookworm infection is a worldwide intestinal parasitic disease affectingmore than one billion people. It represents an important public health problem in rural areasof developing countries. In our environment, it is generally considered an imported diseasedue to the immigration process. Patients and method Retrospective observational study of African immigrants diagnosed withhookworm infection at the Immigration and Tropical Medicine Unit of the Hospital of Mataróover the period 1984-1999. Results We identified 285 patients, mainly young males, from Gambia or Senegal, with a precariousjob who had arrived in Spain 3 years earlier or less. Abdominal pain was the commonestreason for consultation (28.8%) cases. Non digestive symptoms were 35.6% and 4.6% remainedassymptomatic. 60% had a concomitant infectious disease. Laboratory tests showediron-deficiency anemia in 28.4% and eosinophilia in 52.3%. 70% of patients did not come tovisit after treatment. Conclusions Microbiologic stool examination is recommended as part of the health assessmentof immigrants from countries where hookworm infection is highly prevalent, even in the absenceof abdominal symptoms or abnormalities of the red and white blood series.
    Medicina Clinica - MED CLIN. 01/2003; 121(4):139-141.
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    ABSTRACT: Immigrants can carry diseases characteristic from their countries of origin. These are known as imported diseases (ID) and can be classified into tropical diseases (TD) or cosmopolitan diseases (CD). The aim of this study was to analyse the ID in African immigrants and evaluate their repercussion in the Spanish Public Health. Observational study, retrospective protocol, carried from 1984 to 1994 in African immigrants seen in a reference Hospital. Not infectious chronic ID were excluded. The repercussion in public health was divided in 3 categories according to transmission risk to the host population: a) ID without current risk; b) ID with potential risk and, c) ID of risk. 1,321 African immigrants were considered. Most of them were from Sub-Saharan Africa. The most frequent TD were helminthiases and among CD, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases and parasitoses. ID without transmission risk were 26.7% (2.4% CD and 24.3% TD), ID with potential risk 35.2% (33.6% CD and 1.6% TD) and ID with risk 38% (all CD). The CD and their association with poverty suppose a higher risk of transmission to the host country population. Global policies of helping social and economic insertion of immigrant populations, combined with international health collaboration, will rebound positively in the general population's health.
    Medicina Clínica 12/2002; 119(16):616-9. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study presented here aimed to contrast the marked clinical differences in the presentation of Schistosoma mansoni-induced infection between immigrants and travellers entering Spain from endemic regions, and to elucidate the therapeutic implications of these infections. A total of 200 African immigrants and 80 travellers with schistosomiasis were included in the study. Among the immigrants, 25 patients were diagnosed with Schistosoma mansoni infection; 15 presented with nonspecific symptoms, and 10 were asymptomatic. Hepatosplenomegaly was observed in nine. Among the travellers, 14 were diagnosed with Schistosoma mansoni infection; four were asymptomatic, four had Katayama syndrome, four had diarrhoea, and two had prostatitis. All of the patients were treated with praziquantel. Patients diagnosed with Katayama syndrome received praziquantel and dexamethasone for 3 days, with the praziquantel treatment being repeated at 3-4 weeks. The significant differences observed in the clinical presentation of Schistosoma mansoni-induced infection, indicate that a well-differentiated therapeutic strategy is required when this infection is diagnosed in a non-immune (traveller) or a semi-immune (immigrant) patient.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 04/2002; 21(3):219-23. · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this prospective study, the authors assessed the incidence, aetiology, and outcome of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the general population. From December 1993 to November 1995, a study was performed in a mixed residential-industrial urban population of the "Maresme" region in Barcelona, Spain. All subjects > or =14 yrs of age (annual average population size 74,368 inhabitants) with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia were registered. All cases were re-evaluated by chest radiographs on the 5th day of illness and at monthly intervals until complete recovery. Urine and blood samples were obtained for culture and antigen detection. When lower respiratory tract secretions were obtained, these were also cultured. There were 241 patients with community-acquired pneumonia, with an annual incidence rate of 1.62 cases (95% confidence interval, 1.42-1.82) per 1,000 inhabitants. Incidence rates increased by age groups and were higher in males than in females. Of 232 patients with aetiological data, 104 had an identifiable aetiology. A total of 114 pathogens were found (single pathogen 94, two pathogens 10). There were 81 episodes of bacterial infection and 33 of viral infection. The most common pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and influenza A and B viruses. No case of Hantavirus infection was found. The rate of hospital admission was 61.4% with a mean+/-SD length of 11.7+/-10.1 days, a mean period of 23.0+/-14.3 days inactivity, and an overall mortality rate of 5%. The high rate of hospital admission, prolonged stay in hospital, and long period of inactivity all continue to constitute a social and health care burden of community-acquired pneumonia.
    European Respiratory Journal 05/2000; 15(4):757-63. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Immigrants can carry diseases characteristic from their countries of origin. Theseare known as imported diseases (ID) and can be classified into tropical diseases (TD) or cosmopolitandiseases (CD). The aim of this study was to analyse the ID in African immigrants andevaluate their repercussion in the Spanish Public Health. Patients and method Observational study, retrospective protocol, carried from 1984 to 1994 inAfrican immigrants seen in a reference Hospital. Not infectious chronic ID were excluded. Therepercussion in public health was divided in 3 categories according to transmission risk to thehost population: a) ID without current risk; b) ID with potential risk and, c) ID of risk. Results 1,321 African immigrants were considered. Most of them were from Sub-Saharan Africa.The most frequent TD were helminthiases and among CD, tuberculosis, sexually transmitteddiseases and parasitoses. ID without transmission risk were 26.7% (2.4% CD and 24.3% TD),ID with potential risk 35.2% (33.6% CD and 1.6% TD) and ID with risk 38% (all CD). Conclusions The CD and their association with poverty suppose a higher risk of transmission tothe host country population. Global policies of helping social and economic insertion of immigrantpopulations, combined with international health collaboration, will rebound positively inthe general population's health.
    Medicina Clínica. 119(16):616–619.