Mark A Espeland

Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States

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Publications (264)1165.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to determine if the cumulative effects of head impacts from a season of high school football produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measureable changes in the brain in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussion. Players from a local high school football team were instrumented with the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITs) during all practices and games. All players received pre- and post-season MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was also conducted. Total impacts and Risk Weighted cumulative Exposure (RWE), including linear (RWELinear), rotational (RWERotational), and combined components (RWECP) were computed from the sensor data. Fractional, linear, planar and spherical anisotropies (FA, CL, CP, CS, respectively), as well as mean diffusivity (MD), were used to determine total number of abnormal white matter voxels defined as 2 standard deviations above or below the group mean. Delta (post-pre season) ImPACT scores for each individual were computed and compared to the DTI measures using the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. None of the players analyzed experienced clinical concussion (N = 24). Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship between RWECP and FA. Secondary analyses demonstrated additional statistically significant linear associations between RWE (RWECP and RWELinear) and all DTI measures. There was also a strong correlation between DTI measures and change in Verbal Memory subscore of the ImPACT. We demonstrate that a single season of football can produce brain MRI changes in the absence of clinical concussion. Similar brain MRI changes have been previously associated with mild traumatic brain injury.
    Journal of neurotrauma 05/2014; · 4.25 Impact Factor
  • R.R. Wing, T. Leahey, M. Espeland
    Obesity 05/2014; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is unknown whether intentional weight loss provides long-term benefits for cognitive function. An ancillary study to a randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in overweight and obese individuals (N = 978), aged 45-76 years at enrollment, with type 2 diabetes. An intensive behavioral intervention designed to promote and maintain weight loss through caloric restriction and increased physical activity was compared with diabetes support and education. Standardized assessments of cognitive function were collected an average of 8.1 years after trial enrollment. Participants assigned to intensive lifestyle intervention lost a mean (SE) 11.1% (0.4%) and 7.2% (0.5%) of weight at Years 1 and 8, respectively, compared with 1.0% (0.2%) and 3.3% (0.5%) in the control group (p < .001). Covariate-adjusted mean composite cognitive function test scores were similar for the two groups (p = .69), and no significant differences were found for any individual cognitive test. There was some evidence of a differential effect (nominal interaction p = .008) for a prespecified comparison: Intensive lifestyle intervention was associated with a relative mean benefit for composite cognitive function of 0.276 (95% confidence interval: 0.033, 0.520) SDs among individuals with body mass index less than 30kg/m(2) at baseline compared with a relative mean deficit of 0.086 (-0.021, 0.194) SDs among individuals with body mass more than or equal to 30kg/m(2). Eight years of intensive lifestyle intervention did not alter cognitive function in obese adults with type 2 diabetes; however, there was evidence for benefit among overweight but not obese individuals. Changes in cognition were not assessed in this cross-sectional study.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 03/2014; · 4.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Weight loss programs are often conducted in a group format, but it is unclear whether weight losses or adherence cluster within treatment group and whether characteristics of the group (e.g., size or homogeneity) affect outcomes. We examined these questions within Look AHEAD, a multicenter study of the effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods Weight losses and adherence (attendance, use of meal replacement products, and minutes of activity) were examined over one year of intervention in 2329 ILI participants in 209 treatment groups, which all received the same weight loss program. ResultsWeight losses did not cluster among members of a treatment group (intra-class correlation [ICC] of 0.007), whereas measures of adherence had small/moderate clustering (ICCs of 0.05-0.11). The 209 groups varied in weight losses, with a mean of 8.64% (SD = 2.35%, interquartile range = 6.82%, 10.32%), but neither size nor baseline homogeneity of members affected the outcome. Conclusions Although these findings suggest that it may not be necessary to control for clustering in behavioral weight loss studies, they also indicate that merely treating individuals in groups is not sufficient to harness social influences on weight loss.
    Obesity 03/2014; 22(3). · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated depressive symptoms (DS) are associated with incident mild cognitive impairment and probable dementia in postmenopausal women. We examined the association of elevated DS with domain-specific cognitive changes and the moderating role of cardiovascular risk factor severity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 2221 elderly women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Study of Cognitive Aging were separated into those with (N = 204) and without (N = 2017) elevated DS. The DS and multidomain cognitive outcomes were measured annually for an average follow-up of 5.04 years. Women with elevated DS showed baseline multidomain cognitive deficits but longitudinal declines in global cognition only. Persistent DS was related to greater global cognition, verbal knowledge and fluency, and memory declines. Significant DS-CVD interactions were observed cross-sectionally (but not longitudinally) for figural memory and fine motor speed. Future studies should investigate the role of nonvascular mechanisms linking DS and cognitive decline.
    Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology 02/2014; · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether smaller brain volumes in older women who had completed Women's Health Initiative (WHI)-assigned conjugated equine estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT), reported by WHI Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI, correspond to a continuing increased rate of atrophy an average of 6.1 to 7.7 years later in WHIMS-MRI2. A total of 1,230 WHI participants were contacted: 797 (64.8%) consented, and 729 (59%) were rescanned an average of 4.7 years after the initial MRI scan. Mean annual rates of change in total brain volume, the primary outcome, and rates of change in ischemic lesion volumes, the secondary outcome, were compared between treatment groups using mixed-effect models with adjustment for trial, clinical site, age, intracranial volumes, and time between MRI measures. Total brain volume decreased an average of 3.22 cm(3)/y in the active arm and 3.07 cm(3)/y in the placebo arm (p = 0.53). Total ischemic lesion volumes increased in both arms at a rate of 0.12 cm(3)/y (p = 0.88). Conjugated equine estrogen-based postmenopausal HT, previously assigned at WHI baseline, did not affect rates of decline in brain volumes or increases in brain lesion volumes during the 4.7 years between the initial and follow-up WHIMS-MRI studies. Smaller frontal lobe volumes were observed as persistent group differences among women assigned to active HT compared with placebo. Women with a history of cardiovascular disease treated with active HT, compared with placebo, had higher rates of accumulation in white matter lesion volume and total brain lesion volume. Further study may elucidate mechanisms that explain these findings.
    Neurology 02/2014; 82(5):427-34. · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To test whether red blood cell (RBC) levels of marine omega-3 fatty acids measured in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study were related to MRI brain volumes measured 8 years later. RBC eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and MRI brain volumes were assessed in 1,111 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study. The endpoints were total brain volume and anatomical regions. Linear mixed models included multiple imputations of fatty acids and were adjusted for hormone therapy, time since randomization, demographics, intracranial volume, and cardiovascular disease risk factors. In fully adjusted models, a 1 SD greater RBC EPA + DHA (omega-3 index) level was correlated with 2.1 cm(3) larger brain volume (p = 0.048). DHA was marginally correlated (p = 0.063) with total brain volume while EPA was less so (p = 0.11). There were no correlations between ischemic lesion volumes and EPA, DHA, or EPA + DHA. A 1 SD greater omega-3 index was correlated with greater hippocampal volume (50 mm(3), p = 0.036) in fully adjusted models. Comparing the fourth quartile vs the first quartile of the omega-3 index confirmed greater hippocampal volume (159 mm(3), p = 0.034). A higher omega-3 index was correlated with larger total normal brain volume and hippocampal volume in postmenopausal women measured 8 years later. While normal aging results in overall brain atrophy, lower omega-3 index may signal increased risk of hippocampal atrophy. Future studies should examine whether maintaining higher RBC EPA + DHA levels slows the rate of hippocampal or overall brain atrophy.
    Neurology 01/2014; · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Research has shown that several types of erythrocyte fatty acids (i.e., omega-3, omega-6, and trans) are associated with risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, there are complex metabolic and dietary relations among fatty acids, which induce correlations that are typically ignored when using them as risk predictors. A latent variable approach could summarize these complex relations into a few latent variable scores for use in statistical models. Twenty-two red blood cell (RBC) fatty acids were measured in Framingham (N = 3196). The correlation matrix of the fatty acids was modeled using structural equation modeling; the model was tested for goodness-of-fit and gender invariance. Thirteen fatty acids were summarized by three latent variables, and gender invariance was rejected so separate models were developed for men and women. A score was developed for the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) latent variable, which explained about 30% of the variance in the data. The PUFA score included loadings in opposing directions among three omega-3 and three omega-6 fatty acids, and incorporated the biosynthetic and dietary relations among them. Whether the PUFA factor score can improve the performance of risk prediction in cardiovascular diseases remains to be tested.
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine 01/2014; 2014:160520. · 0.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to determine the relationship between the omega-3 fatty acid content of red blood cell membranes (RBC), in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and baseline and new-onset depressive symptoms in post-menopausal women. We secondarily sought to characterize the association between dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake and depressive symptomatology. Study participants included 7086 members of the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (aged 63-81 years) who had an assessment of RBC omega-3 fatty acid concentrations at the baseline screening visit. Depressive symptoms at baseline and follow-up were characterized using the Burnam eight-item scale for depressive disorders (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale/Diagnostic Interview Schedule short form) and secondarily additionally inferred by antidepressant medication use. In multivariable-adjusted models, our primary exposure, RBC DHA + EPA, was not related to depressive symptoms by any measure at baseline or follow-up, nor were RBC total omega-3, DHA, or EPA (all p > 0.2). In contrast, dietary intake of omega-3 was positively associated with depressive symptoms at baseline (adjusted odds ratio 1.082, 95% confidence interval 1.004-1.166; p = 0.04 for dietary DHA + EPA and Burnam score ≥0.06), although this generally did not persist at follow-up. No relationship between RBC omega-3 levels and subsequent depressive symptoms was evident, and associations between dietary omega-3 and depressive symptoms were variable. Biomarkers of omega-3 status do not appear to be related to risk of new depression in post-menopausal women. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 12/2013; · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the cognitive factors associated with adherence to anti-estrogen therapy. Our objective was to investigate the association between domain-specific cognitive function and adherence among women in a clinical prevention trial of oral anti-estrogen therapies. We performed a secondary analysis of Co-STAR, an ancillary study of the STAR breast cancer prevention trial in which postmenopausal women at increased breast cancer risk were randomized to tamoxifen or raloxifene. Co-STAR enrolled non-demented participants ≥65 years old to compare treatment effects on cognition. The cognitive battery assessed global cognitive function (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam), and specific cognitive domains of verbal knowledge, verbal fluency, figural memory, verbal memory, attention and working memory, spatial ability, and fine motor speed. Adherence was defined by a ratio of actual time taking therapy per protocol ≥80% of expected time. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between cognitive test scores and adherence to therapy. The mean age of the 1,331 Co-STAR participants was 67.2±4.3 years. Mean 3MS score was 95.1 (4.7) and 14% were non-adherent. In adjusted analyses, the odds of non-adherence were lower for those with better scores on verbal memory [OR (95% CI): 0.75 (0.62, 0.92)]. Larger relative deficits in verbal memory compared to verbal fluency were also associated with non-adherence [1.28(1.08, 1.51)]. Among non-demented older women, subtle differences in memory performance were associated with medication adherence. Differential performance across cognitive domains may help identify persons at greater risk for poor adherence.
    Cancer Prevention Research 11/2013; · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. Design and Methods: The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess inter-artery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. Results: ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; p=0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: p=0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (p<0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (p=0.01)]. Conclusions: Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites.
    Obesity 10/2013; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that higher levels of red blood cell (RBC) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have a protective association with domain-specific cognitive function in women aged 65 years and older. A total of 2,157 women with normal cognition enrolled in a clinical trial of postmenopausal hormone therapy were followed with annual cognitive testing for a median of 5.9 years. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed the relationship between prerandomization RBC DHA + EPA levels and a) cognitive measures at baseline, and b) cognitive change over time. Endpoints were composite cognitive function and performance in 7 cognitive domains: fine motor speed, verbal memory, visual memory, spatial ability, verbal knowledge, verbal fluency, and working memory. After adjustment for demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics, no significant (p < 0.01) cross-sectional cognitive differences were found between women in the high and low DHA + EPA tertiles at the time of the first annual cognitive battery. In addition, no significant (p < 0.01) differences were found between the high and low DHA + EPA tertiles in the rate of cognitive change over time. We did not find an association between RBC DHA + EPA levels and age-associated cognitive decline in a cohort of older, dementia-free women.
    Neurology 09/2013; · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • JAMA Intern Med. 08/2013; 173(15):1429-1436.
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    New England Journal of Medicine 06/2013; · 51.66 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 06/2013; 61(6):1050-1. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of 4 years of intensive lifestyle intervention on weight, fitness, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in older and younger individuals. DESIGN: Randomized controlled clinical trial. SETTING: Sixteen U.S. clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus: 1,053 aged 65 to 76 and 4,092 aged 45 to 64. INTERVENTIONS: An intensive behavioral intervention designed to promote and maintain weight loss through caloric restriction and increased physical activity was compared with diabetes mellitus support and education. MEASUREMENTS: Standardized assessments of weight, fitness (based on graded exercise testing), and cardiovascular disease risk factors. RESULTS: Over 4 years, older individuals had greater intervention-related mean weight losses (6.2%) than younger participants (5.1%; interaction P = .006) and comparable relative mean increases in fitness (0.56 vs 0.53 metabolic equivalents; interaction P = .72). These benefits were seen consistently across subgroups of older adults formed according to many demographic and health factors. Of a panel of age-related health conditions, only self-reported worsening vision was associated with poorer intervention-related weight loss in older individuals. The intensive lifestyle intervention produced mean increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (2.03 mg/dL; P < .001) and decreases in glycated hemoglobin (0.21%; P < .001) and waist circumference (3.52 cm; P < .001) over 4 years that were at least as large in older as in younger individuals. CONCLUSION: Intensive lifestyle intervention targeting weight loss and increased physical activity is effective in overweight and obese older individuals to produce sustained weight loss and improvements in fitness and cardiovascular risk factors.
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 05/2013; · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of estrogen therapy (ET) on carotid artery inflammation when initiated early and late relative to surgical menopause. Female cynomolgus macaques consuming atherogenic diets were ovariectomized and randomized to control or oral estradiol (E2; human equivalent dose of 1 mg/d micronized E2) initiated at 1 month (early menopause, n = 24) or 54 months (late menopause, n = 40) after ovariectomy. The treatment period was 8 months. Carotid artery expression of the markers of monocyte/macrophages (CD68 and CD163), dendritic cells (CD83), natural killer cells (neural cell adhesion molecule-1), and interferon-γ was significantly lower in E2-treated animals in the early menopause group but not in the late menopause group (P < 0.05). In contrast, carotid artery transcripts for T-cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD25), interleukin-10, type I collagen, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in E2-treated monkeys regardless of menopausal stage (P < 0.05). ET initiated soon after menopause inhibits macrophage accumulation in the carotid artery, an effect that is not observed when E2 is administered after several years of estrogen deficiency. No evidence for pro-inflammatory effects of late ET is observed. The results provide support for the timing hypothesis of postmenopausal ET with implications for the interpretation of outcomes in the Women's Health Initiative.
    Menopause (New York, N.Y.) 05/2013; 20(5):540-7. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The liver is an insulin-responsive organ that contributes significantly to both whole body insulin sensitivity and availability of sex steroids through the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Our objective was to explore whether lower SHBG was associated with ectopic liver fat and mediated its effect on insulin resistance in The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). A subset of midlife African American and Caucasian women from SWAN (n = 208; 50.9 ± 0.18 yrs; 71% Caucasian) had computed tomography scans to quantify visceral, subcutaneous and liver fat. Blood samples were collected and assayed for hormonal and metabolic markers. The cohort, while overweight, was generally healthy, and both liver fat and SHBG were unaffected by menopausal stage or race. Both higher liver fat and lower SHBG levels were significantly associated with higher insulin concentrations after adjustment for adiposity (r = -0.25, P < 0.001 and r = -0.18, P = 0.01). SHBG and liver fat had additive effects on insulin concentrations such that women with the lowest SHBG and the highest fat levels had the highest values (interaction P = 0.09). The association between SHBG and insulin was more apparent among women with fattier livers. SHBG and liver fat appear to have independent effects on insulin levels as adjustment for each other did not diminish the strength of either association (P = 0.023 and 0.001 respectively). These results confirmed the strong independent associations between increased liver fat and decreased SHBG with increased metabolic risk in midlife women. Further these data underscore the need for additional research into the role of liver fat in modifying SHBG's influence on insulin levels.
    Obesity 05/2013; 21(5):1031-8. · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Computer-administered assessment of cognitive function is being increasingly incorporated in clinical trials; however, its performance in these settings has not been systematically evaluated. DESIGN: The Seniors Health and Activity Research Program pilot trial (N = 73) developed a computer-based tool for assessing memory performance and executive functioning. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders investigators incorporated this battery in a full-scale multicenter clinical trial (N = 1635). We describe relationships that test scores have with those from interviewer-administered cognitive function tests and risk factors for cognitive deficits and describe performance measures (completeness, intraclass correlations [ICC]). RESULTS: Computer-based assessments of cognitive function had consistent relationships across the pilot and full-scale trial cohorts with interviewer-administered assessments of cognitive function, age, and a measure of physical function. In the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders cohort, their external validity was further demonstrated by associations with other risk factors for cognitive dysfunction: education, hypertension, diabetes, and physical function. Acceptable levels of data completeness (>83%) were achieved on all computer-based measures; however, rates of missing data were higher among older participants (odds ratio = 1.06 for each additional year; p < 0.001) and those who reported no current computer use (odds ratio = 2.71; p < 0.001). ICCs among clinics were at least as low (ICC < 0.013) as for interviewer measures (ICC < 0.023), reflecting good standardization. All cognitive measures loaded onto the first principal component (global cognitive function), which accounted for 40% of the overall variance. CONCLUSION: Our results support the use of computer-based tools for assessing cognitive function in multicenter clinical trials of older individuals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 04/2013; · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study-Younger (WHIMS-Y) was designed to assess the effect of prior random assignment to hormone therapy (HT) (conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) alone or CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)) on global cognitive function in younger middle-aged women relative to placebo. WHIMS-Y was an ancillary study to the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) HT trial and enrolled 1361 women who were aged 50–55 years and postmenopausal at WHI enrollment. WHIMS-Y will examine whether an average of 5.4 years of HT during early menopause has longer term protective effects on global cognitive function and if these effects vary by regimen, time between menopause and study initiation, and prior use of HT. We present the study rationale and design. We describe enrollment, adherence to assigned WHI therapy, and compare risk factor characteristics of the WHIMS-Y cohort at the time of WHI enrollment to similar aged women in the WHI HT who did not enroll in WHIMS-Y. Challenges of WHIMS-Y include lower than expected and differential enrollment. Strengths of WHIMS-Y include balance in baseline risk factors between treatment groups, standardized and masked data collection, and high rates of retention and on-trial adherence and exposure. In addition, the telephone-administered cognitive battery showed adequate construct validity. WHIMS-Y provided an unprecedented chance to examine the hypothesis that HT may have protective effects on cognition in younger postmenopausal women aged 50–55 years. Integrated into the WHI, WHIMS-Y optimized the experience of WHI investigators to ensure high retention and excellent quality assurance across sites.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hormone Therapy.
    Brain research 04/2013; 1514:3–11. · 2.46 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,165.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994–2014
    • Wake Forest School of Medicine
      • • Department of Biostatistical Sciences
      • • Division of Public Health Sciences
      Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • 2013
    • Brown University
      Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • 1991–2013
    • Wake Forest University
      • • Department of Biostatistical Sciences
      • • Department of Health and Exercise Science
      • • Department of Public Health Sciences
      • • School of Medicine
      Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • 2012
    • Sioux Falls Seminary
      Sioux Falls, South Dakota, United States
    • Medical College of Wisconsin
      • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
      Milwaukee, WI, United States
  • 2011
    • RAND Corporation
      Santa Monica, California, United States
    • Tufts University
      Georgia, United States
    • Northwestern University
      • Department of Medicine
      Evanston, IL, United States
  • 2004–2011
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Personality and Cognition (LPC)
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2010
    • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Radiology
      Seattle, WA, United States
    • The University of Tennessee Health Science Center
      • Department of Preventive Medicine
      Memphis, TN, United States
  • 2003
    • Pennington Biomedical Research Center
      Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
  • 2002
    • Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
      New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
  • 2000
    • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1999
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1995
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1993
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 1987–1991
    • UCL Eastman Dental Institute
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1987–1990
    • University of Rochester
      Rochester, New York, United States
  • 1989
    • University Center Rochester
      • Department of Biostatistics
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States