Arthur P Wheeler

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, MI, United States

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Publications (72)698.96 Total impact

  • Matthew W Semler, Arthur P Wheeler
    Chest 06/2014; 145(6):1181-2. · 5.85 Impact Factor
  • Janna S Landsperger, Arthur P Wheeler
    Critical care medicine 03/2014; 42(3):731-2. · 6.37 Impact Factor
  • Michael J Noto, Arthur P Wheeler
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 07/2013; 188(2):128-30. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not well understood. Inducible NOS is upregulated during physiologic stress; however, if NOS substrate is insufficient then NOS can uncouple and switch from NO generation to production of damaging peroxynitrites. We hypothesized that NOS substrate levels are low in patients with severe sepsis and that low levels of the NOS substrate citrulline would be associated with end organ damage including ARDS in severe sepsis. METHODS: Plasma citrulline, arginine and ornithine levels and nitrate/nitrite were measured at baseline in 135 patients with severe sepsis. ARDS was diagnosed by Consensus definitions. RESULTS: Plasma citrulline levels were below normal in all patients [median 9.2 uM, IQR 5.2 - 14.4)] and were significantly lower in ARDS compared to the no ARDS group [6.0 (3.3 - 10.4) vs. 10.1 (6.2 - 16.6), P= 0.002]. The rate of ARDS was 50% in the lowest citrulline quartile compared to 15% in the highest citrulline quartile (p = 0.002). In multivariable analyses, citrulline levels were associated with ARDS even after adjustment for covariates including severity of illness. CONCLUSIONS: In severe sepsis, levels of the NOS substrate citrulline are low and are associated with ARDS. Low NOS substrate levels have been shown in other disease states to lead to NOS uncoupling and oxidative injury suggesting a potential mechanism for the association between low citrulline and ARDS. Further studies are needed to determine whether citrulline supplementation could prevent the development of ARDS in patients with severe sepsis and to determine its role in NOS coupling and function.
    Critical care (London, England) 01/2013; 17(1):R10. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Barriers to executing large-scale randomized controlled trials include costs, complexity, and regulatory requirements. We hypothesized that source document verification (SDV) via remote electronic monitoring is feasible. Five hospitals from two NIH sponsored networks provided remote electronic access to study monitors. We evaluated pre-visit remote SDV compared to traditional on-site SDV using a randomized convenience sample of all study subjects due for a monitoring visit. The number of data values verified and the time to perform remote and on-site SDV was collected. Thirty-two study subjects were randomized to either remote SDV (N=16) or traditional on-site SDV (N=16). Technical capabilities, remote access policies and regulatory requirements varied widely across sites. In the adult network, only 14 of 2965 data values (0.47%) could not be located remotely. In the traditional on-site SDV arm, 3 of 2608 data values (0.12%) required coordinator help. In the pediatric network, all 198 data values in the remote SDV arm and all 183 data values in the on-site SDV arm were located. Although not statistically significant there was a consistent trend for more time consumed per data value (minutes +/- SD): Adult 0.50 +/- 0.17 min vs. 0.39 +/- 0.10 min (two-tailed t-test p=0.11); Pediatric 0.99 +/- 1.07 min vs. 0.56 +/- 0.61 min (p=0.37) and time per case report form: Adult: 4.60 +/- 1.42 min vs. 3.60 +/- 0.96 min (p=0.10); Pediatric: 11.64 +/- 7.54 min vs. 6.07 +/- 3.18 min (p=0.10) using remote SDV. Because each site had different policies, requirements, and technologies, a common approach to assimilating monitors into the access management system could not be implemented. Despite substantial technology differences, more than 99% of data values were successfully monitored remotely. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of remote monitoring and the need to develop consistent access policies for remote study monitoring.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(12):e81890. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While the results of clinical research are clearly valuable in the care of critically ill patients, the limitations of such information and the role of other forms of medical knowledge for clinical decision making have not been carefully examined. The leadership of three large professional societies representing critical care practitioners convened a diverse group representing a wide variety of views regarding the role of clinical research results in clinical practice to develop a document to serve as a basis for agreement and a framework for ongoing discussion. Consensus was reached on several issues. While the results of rigorous clinical research are important in arriving at the best course of action for an individual critically ill patient, other forms of medical knowledge, including clinical experience and pathophysiologic reasoning, remain essential. No single source of knowledge is sufficient to guide clinical decisions, nor does one kind of knowledge always take precedence over others. Clinicians will find clinical research compelling for a variety of reasons that go beyond study design. While clinical practice guidelines and protocols based upon clinical research may improve care and decrease variability in practice, clinicians must be able to understand and articulate the rationale as to why a particular protocol or guideline is used or why an alternative approach is taken. Making this clinical reasoning explicit is necessary to understand practice variability. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of medical knowledge for clinical decision making and factors beyond study design that make clinical research compelling to clinicians can provide a framework for understanding the role of clinical research in practice.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 05/2012; 185(10):1117-24. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether automated identification with physician notification of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in medical intensive care unit patients expedites early administration of new antibiotics or improvement of other patient outcomes in patients with sepsis. : A prospective randomized, controlled, single center study. Medical intensive care unit of an academic, tertiary care medical center. Four hundred forty-two consecutive patients admitted over a 4-month period who met modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria in a medical intensive care unit. Patients were randomized to monitoring by an electronic "Listening Application" to detect modified (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) criteria vs. usual care. The listening application notified physicians in real time when modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria were detected, but did not provide management recommendations. The median time to new antibiotics was similar between the intervention and usual care groups when comparing among all patients (6.0 hr vs. 6.1 hr, p = .95), patients with sepsis (5.3 hr vs. 5.1 hr; p = .90), patients on antibiotics at enrollment (5.2 hr vs. 7.0 hr, p = .27), or patients not on antibiotics at enrollment (5.2 hr vs. 5.1 hr, p = .85). The amount of fluid administered following detection of modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria was similar between groups whether comparing all patients or only patients who were hypotensive at enrollment. Other clinical outcomes including intensive care unit length of stay, hospital length of stay, and mortality were not shown to be different between patients in the intervention and control groups. Realtime alerts of modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria to physicians in one tertiary care medical intensive care unit were feasible and safe but did not influence measured therapeutic interventions for sepsis or significantly alter clinical outcomes.
    Critical care medicine 05/2012; 40(7):2096-101. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    Michael J Noto, Arthur P Wheeler
    Chest 05/2012; 141(5):1131-2. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of treatment guidelines on clinical outcomes in general and specifically for trauma patients has not been well-studied. We hypothesized that better compliance with guidelines would be associated with improved clinical outcomes. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded, multicentered, placebo-controlled study of recombinant factor VII in severe trauma that utilized guidelines for damage control, transfusions, and mechanical ventilation. Vanderbilt Coordinating Center reviewed compliance in near real-time and reported deviations classified as minor, moderate, or major to investigators. Multivariate regression analysis measured the association between outcomes (30-day and 90-day mortality, development of multiple organ failure, ventilator-free days, renal failure-free days, and blood products transfused) and compliance with each guideline, as well as a composite assessment of overall compliance. One hundred hospitals in 26 countries. Blunt and/or penetrating trauma patients aged 18-70 yrs who had received 4-8 units of red blood cells for active torso and/or proximal lower extremity bleeding despite standard interventions. When assessed as composite end point, major deviations from guidelines were associated with significantly higher mortality at 30 and 90 days after injury and fewer renal failure-free days. Moderate deviations were associated with a significantly higher risk of multiple organ failure and fewer ventilator-free days. Moderate and major deviations from damage control and ventilation guidelines were also significantly associated with higher risk of death at days 30 and 90. Within the ventilation protocol, noncompliance with tidal volume and plateau pressure targets was associated with significantly higher mortality at days 30 and 90 and fewer ventilator-free days, whereas noncompliance with weaning guideline was only associated with significantly fewer ventilator-free days. : In a clinical trial of trauma patients, higher compliance with guidelines for damage control, transfusion, and ventilation management is associated with lower mortality and improved outcomes.
    Critical care medicine 03/2012; 40(3):778-86. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The amount of enteral nutrition patients with acute lung injury need is unknown. To determine if initial lower-volume trophic enteral feeding would increase ventilator-free days and decrease gastrointestinal intolerances compared with initial full enteral feeding. The EDEN study, a randomized, open-label, multicenter trial conducted from January 2, 2008, through April 12, 2011. Participants were 1000 adults within 48 hours of developing acute lung injury requiring mechanical ventilation whose physicians intended to start enteral nutrition at 44 hospitals in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ARDS Clinical Trials Network. Participants were randomized to receive either trophic or full enteral feeding for the first 6 days. After day 6, the care of all patients who were still receiving mechanical ventilation was managed according to the full feeding protocol. Ventilator-free days to study day 28. Baseline characteristics were similar between the trophic-feeding (n = 508) and full-feeding (n = 492) groups. The full-feeding group received more enteral calories for the first 6 days, about 1300 kcal/d compared with 400 kcal/d (P < .001). Initial trophic feeding did not increase the number of ventilator-free days (14.9 [95% CI, 13.9 to 15.8] vs 15.0 [95% CI, 14.1 to 15.9]; difference, -0.1 [95% CI, -1.4 to 1.2]; P = .89) or reduce 60-day mortality (23.2% [95% CI, 19.6% to 26.9%] vs 22.2% [95% CI, 18.5% to 25.8%]; difference, 1.0% [95% CI, -4.1% to 6.3%]; P = .77) compared with full feeding. There were no differences in infectious complications between the groups. Despite receiving more prokinetic agents, the full-feeding group experienced more vomiting (2.2% vs 1.7% of patient feeding days; P = .05), elevated gastric residual volumes (4.9% vs 2.2% of feeding days; P < .001), and constipation (3.1% vs 2.1% of feeding days; P = .003). Mean plasma glucose values and average hourly insulin administration were both higher in the full-feeding group over the first 6 days. In patients with acute lung injury, compared with full enteral feeding, a strategy of initial trophic enteral feeding for up to 6 days did not improve ventilator-free days, 60-day mortality, or infectious complications but was associated with less gastrointestinal intolerance. clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00609180 and NCT00883948.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 02/2012; 307(8):795-803. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Although enteral nutrition (EN) is provided to most mechanically ventilated patients, the effect of specific feeding strategies on circulating markers of coagulation and inflammation is unknown. Methods: Markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-1β, interferon [IFN]-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12) and coagulation (tissue factor [TF], plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) were measured at baseline (n = 185) and 6 days (n = 103) in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients enrolled in a randomized controlled study of trophic vs full-energy feeds to test the hypothesis that trophic enteral feeds would be associated with decreases in markers of inflammation and coagulation compared to full-energy feeds. Results: There were no differences in any of the biomarkers measured at day 6 between patients who were randomized to receive trophic feeds compared to full-energy feeds. However, TF levels decreased modestly in patients from baseline to day 6 in the trophic feeding group (343.3 vs 247.8 pg/mL, P = .061) but increased slightly in the full-calorie group (314.3 vs 331.8 pg/mL). Lower levels of TF at day 6 were associated with a lower mortality, and patients who died had increasing TF levels between days 0 and 6 (median increase of 39.7) compared to decreasing TF levels in patients who lived (median decrease of 95.0, P = .033). Conclusions: EN strategy in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure does not significantly modify inflammation and coagulation by day 6, but trophic feeds may have some modest effects in attenuating inflammation and coagulation.
    Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 02/2012; 36(6):732-40. · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, along with γ-linolenic acid and antioxidants, may modulate systemic inflammatory response and improve oxygenation and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury. To determine if dietary supplementation of these substances to patients with acute lung injury would increase ventilator-free days to study day 28. The OMEGA study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial conducted from January 2, 2008, through February 21, 2009. Participants were 272 adults within 48 hours of developing acute lung injury requiring mechanical ventilation whose physicians intended to start enteral nutrition at 44 hospitals in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ARDS Clinical Trials Network. All participants had complete follow-up. Twice-daily enteral supplementation of n-3 fatty acids, γ-linolenic acid, and antioxidants compared with an isocaloric control. Enteral nutrition, directed by a protocol, was delivered separately from the study supplement. Ventilator-free days to study day 28. The study was stopped early for futility after 143 and 129 patients were enrolled in the n-3 and control groups. Despite an 8-fold increase in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels, patients receiving the n-3 supplement had fewer ventilator-free days (14.0 vs 17.2; P = .02) (difference, -3.2 [95% CI, -5.8 to -0.7]) and intensive care unit-free days (14.0 vs 16.7; P = .04). Patients in the n-3 group also had fewer nonpulmonary organ failure-free days (12.3 vs 15.5; P = .02). Sixty-day hospital mortality was 26.6% in the n-3 group vs 16.3% in the control group (P = .054), and adjusted 60-day mortality was 25.1% and 17.6% in the n-3 and control groups, respectively (P = .11). Use of the n-3 supplement resulted in more days with diarrhea (29% vs 21%; P = .001). Twice-daily enteral supplementation of n-3 fatty acids, γ-linolenic acid, and antioxidants did not improve the primary end point of ventilator-free days or other clinical outcomes in patients with acute lung injury and may be harmful. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00609180.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 10/2011; 306(14):1574-81. · 29.98 Impact Factor
  • Todd W Rice, Arthur P Wheeler
    Critical care medicine 10/2011; 39(10):2382-3. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Demands for critical care services are increasing, but the supply of qualified physicians is not. Moreover, there are mounting national expectations for continuous on-site, senior providers and for adherence to quality and safety practices. In teaching institutions, manpower shortages are exacerbated by shrinking trainee duty hours, and there is a growing desire to recoup the revenue lost when a non-credentialed provider delivers a service. Increasingly, hospitalists and acute-care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) are meeting these needs. This article describes the development of an ACNP service in a university hospital medical intensive care unit (ICU) designed to improve the range and quality of services and faculty staffing when the ICU expanded from 22 to 34 beds without adding physicians. Eight ACNPs were hired and, over 9 months, received didactic, procedural, simulation center, and supervised patient care training. Progressive workload and graded responsibility were used to transition to a 24-hour, in-house, resident-independent, attending-supervised service, which now admits just under half of all patients (3.4 ± 1.3 patients/day), cares for approximately one-fourth of the unit's critically ill patients (6.0 ± 1.4 patients/day), and responds to medical rapid response team calls daily (1.5 ± 1.7 calls/day). Over the first 5 months of operation, work output in all categories continued to increase, with ACNPs documenting an average of 11.1 ± 2.7 activities per day (all data mean ± standard deviation). Acute-care nurse practitioners also provide 40% of the daily resident core lectures and a monthly staff nurse conference. Insufficient data exist at this time, however, to report accurate billing or collection results. Specific areas discussed within this article include service structure, hiring and training, implementation, scheduling, supervision, problems encountered, productivity, monitoring, and future plans.
    Hospital practice (1995). 04/2011; 39(2):32-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Conservative fluid management in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) increases time alive and free from mechanical ventilation. Vascular pedicle width (VPW) is a non-invasive measurement of intravascular volume status. The VPW was studied in ALI patients to determine the correlation between VPW and intravascular pressure measurements and whether VPW could predict fluid status. This retrospective cohort study involved 152 patients with ALI enrolled in the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) from five NHLBI ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome) Network sites. VPW and central venous pressure (CVP) or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) from the first four study days were correlated. The relationships between VPW, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), cumulative fluid balance, and PAOP were also evaluated. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the ability of VPW to detect PAOP < 8 mmHg and PAOP ≥ 18 mm Hg. A total of 71 and 152 patients provided 118 and 276 paired VPW/PAOP and VPW/CVP measurements, respectively. VPW correlated with PAOP (r = 0.41; P < 0.001) and less well with CVP (r = 0.21; P = 0.001). In linear regression, VPW correlated with PAOP 1.5-fold better than cumulative fluid balance and 2.5-fold better than PEEP. VPW discriminated achievement of PAOP < 8 mm Hg (AUC = 0.73; P = 0.04) with VPW ≤67 mm demonstrating 71% sensitivity (95% CI 30 to 95%) and 68% specificity (95% CI 59 to 75%). For discriminating a hydrostatic component of the edema (that is, PAOP ≥ 18 mm Hg), VPW ≥ 72 mm demonstrated 61.4% sensitivity (95% CI 47 to 74%) and 61% specificity (49 to 71%) (area under the curve (AUC) 0.69; P = 0.001). VPW correlates with PAOP better than CVP in patients with ALI. Due to its only moderate sensitivity and specificity, the ability of VPW to discriminate fluid status in patients with acute lung injury is limited and should only be considered when intravascular pressures are unavailable.
    Critical care (London, England) 03/2011; 15(2):R86. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Enteral nutrition is provided to mechanically ventilated patients who cannot eat normally, yet the amount of support needed is unknown. We conducted this randomized, open-label study to test the hypothesis that initial low-volume (i.e., trophic) enteral nutrition would decrease episodes of gastrointestinal intolerance/complications and improve outcomes as compared to initial full-energy enteral nutrition in patients with acute respiratory failure. Randomized, open-label study. A total of 200 patients with acute respiratory failure expected to require mechanical ventilation for at least 72 hrs. Patients were randomized to receive either initial trophic (10 mL/hr) or full-energy enteral nutrition for the initial 6 days of ventilation. The primary outcome measure was ventilator-free days to day 28. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 98 patients randomized to trophic and the 102 patients randomized to full-energy nutrition. At enrollment, patients had a mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 26.9 and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 182 and 38% were in shock. Both groups received similar durations of enteral nutrition (5.5 vs. 5.1 days; p = .51). The trophic group received an average of 15.8% ± 11% of goal calories daily through day 6 compared to 74.8% ± 38.5% (p < .001) for the full-energy group. Both groups had a median of 23.0 ventilator-free days (p = .90) and a median of 21.0 intensive-care-unit-free days (p = .64). Mortality to hospital discharge was 22.4% for the trophic group vs. 19.6% for the full-energy group (p = .62). In the first 6 days, the trophic group had trends for less diarrhea (19% vs. 24% of feeding days; p = .08) and significantly fewer episodes of elevated gastric residual volumes (2% vs. 8% of feeding days; p < .001). Initial trophic enteral nutrition resulted in clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure similar to those of early full-energy enteral nutrition but with fewer episodes of gastrointestinal intolerance.
    Critical care medicine 01/2011; 39(5):967-74. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) remains widely used in acute lung injury (ALI) despite known complications and little evidence of improved short-term mortality. Concurrent with NHLBI ARDS Clinical Trials Network Fluid and Catheters Treatment Trial (FACTT), we conducted a prospectively-defined comparison of healthcare costs and long-term outcomes for care with a PAC vs. central venous catheter (CVC). We explored if use of the PAC in ALI is justified by a beneficial cost-effectiveness profile. We obtained detailed bills for the initial hospitalization. We interviewed survivors using the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 questionnaire at 2, 6, 9 and 12 m to determine quality of life (QOL) and post-discharge resource use. Outcomes beyond 12 m were estimated from federal databases. Incremental costs and outcomes were generated using MonteCarlo simulation. Of 1001 subjects enrolled in FACTT, 774 (86%) were eligible for long-term follow-up and 655 (85%) consented. Hospital costs were similar for the PAC and CVC groups ($96.8k vs. $89.2k, p = 0.38). Post-discharge to 12 m costs were higher for PAC subjects ($61.1k vs. 45.4k, p = 0.03). One-year mortality and QOL among survivors were similar in PAC and CVC groups (mortality: 35.6% vs. 31.9%, p = 0.33; QOL [scale: 0-1]: 0.61 vs. 0.66, p = 0.49). MonteCarlo simulation showed PAC use had a 75.2% probability of being more expensive and less effective (mean cost increase of $14.4k and mean loss of 0.3 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)) and a 94.2% probability of being higher than the $100k/QALY willingness-to-pay threshold. PAC use increased costs with no patient benefit and thus appears unjustified for routine use in ALI. www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00234767.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(7):e22512. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of Toll-like receptor-4-mediated signaling, suppresses cytokine levels and improves 28-day all-cause mortality rates in patients with severe sepsis. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 93 intensive care units worldwide. A total of 274 patients with severe sepsis and shock or respiratory failure. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a 30-min loading dose followed by 96-hr infusions of placebo, TAK-242 1.2 mg/kg/day, or TAK-242 2.4 mg/kg/day. The primary pharmacodynamic end point was change in serum interleukin-6 levels relative to baseline, with 28-day all-cause mortality rate the primary clinical end point. The trial was terminated because of a lack of effect of TAK-242 in suppressing serum interleukin-6 levels. A total of 274 subjects were randomly assigned and treated. Clinical parameters at baseline were balanced across the three groups. TAK-242 did not suppress interleukin-6 as measured by 0- to 96.5-hr area under the interleukin-6 concentration curve at either dose. Specifically, the area under the effect curve increased by 9% and 26.9% in the TAK-242 1.2 and 2.4 mg/kg/day groups, respectively, which was not statistically different from placebo (p = .63 and .15, respectively). The 28-day mortality rate was 24% in the placebo, 22% in the low-dose, and 17% in the high-dose group (p = .26 for placebo vs. high dose). A nonsignificant reduction in mortality rate was observed in a subset of patients with both shock and respiratory failure (placebo [n = 51], 33%, vs. high dose [n = 52], 19%, p = .10). Transient, dose-related increases in methemoglobin levels were observed with TAK-242 treatment in 30.1% of the patients. TAK-242 failed to suppress cytokine levels in patients with sepsis and shock or respiratory failure. Treatment with TAK-242 resulted in mild increases in serum methemoglobin levels but was otherwise well tolerated. Although observed mortality rates in patients with both shock and respiratory failure were lower with the 2.4 mg/kg/day dose, differences were not significant.
    Critical care medicine 08/2010; 38(8):1685-94. · 6.37 Impact Factor
  • Arthur P Wheeler, Todd W Rice
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    ABSTRACT: This manuscript provides an overview of how to interpret in vitro clotting studies and how to select studies to evaluate patients with bleeding disorders in the ICU. It provides a practical approach to understanding the complex subject of clotting factor abnormalities, including the most common problems of preanalytical error and anticoagulation therapy. Limitations and pitfalls of diagnostic testing are highlighted.
    Chest 01/2010; 137(1):185-94. · 5.85 Impact Factor
  • Todd W Rice, Arthur P Wheeler
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    ABSTRACT: Abnormalities of platelet number and function are the most common coagulation disorders seen among ICU patients. This article reviews the most frequent causes of thrombocytopenia by providing an overview of the following most common mechanisms: impaired production; sequestration; dilution; and destruction. Guidelines for treating thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction are also provided.
    Chest 12/2009; 136(6):1622-30. · 5.85 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
698.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2013
    • Vanderbilt University
      • • Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care
      • • Vanderbilt Center for Evidence-based Medicine
      • • Center for Health Services Research
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Biomedical Engineering
      Nashville, MI, United States
  • 2012
    • Eastern Virginia Medical School
      • School of Medicine
      Norfolk, VA, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Vermont
      • Department of Medicine
      Burlington, VT, United States
  • 2002–2005
    • Emory University
      • • Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine
      • • School of Medicine
      Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 1995
    • University of Kentucky
      Lexington, Kentucky, United States