J S Miser

Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States

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Publications (87)481.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) is a group of malignant tumors of soft tissue and bone sharing a chromosomal translocation affecting the EWS locus. The Intergroup INT-0091 demonstrated the superiority of a regimen of vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (VDC), and dactinomycin alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide (IE) over VDC for patients with nonmetastatic ESFT of bone. The goal of this study was to determine whether a dose-intensified regimen of VDC alternating with IE would further improve the outcome for patients with nonmetastatic ESFT of bone or soft tissue. Patients with previously untreated, nonmetastatic ESFT of bone or soft tissue were eligible. They were randomly assigned to receive standard doses of VDC/IE over 48 weeks or a dose-intensified regimen of VDC/IE over 30 weeks. Four hundred seventy-eight patients met eligibility requirements: 231 patients received the standard regimen; 247 patients received the intensified regimen. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival rates for all eligible patients were 71.1% (95% CI, 67.7% to 75.0%) and 78.6% (95% CI, 74.6% to 82.1%), respectively. There was no significant difference (P = .57) in EFS between patients treated with the standard (5-year EFS, 72.1%; 95% CI, 65.8% to 77.5%) or intensified regimen (5-year EFS, 70.1%; 63.9% to 75%). Patients with soft tissue tumors accounted for 20% of the study population; there was no difference in outcome between patients with soft tissue and bone primary sites. Dose escalation of alkylating agents as tested in this trial did not improve the outcome for patients with nonmetastatic ESFT of bone or soft tissue.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/2009; 27(15):2536-41. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis for patients with recurrent Ewing sarcoma (EWS) is very poor with 5-year survival of 13%. To evaluate prognostic factors for these patients we studied patients initially treated on the multi-institutional study INT0091. Two hundred sixty-two patients experienced disease recurrence. The median time to first recurrence was 1.3 years (0-7.4 years), 1.4 years (0-7.4 years) for patients with initially localized disease and 1 year (0-6 years) for patients with initially metastatic disease. Time to first recurrence from date of initial diagnosis was a predictor of post-recurrence survival (P < 0.0001). Twenty-one percent of patients, with recurrent or progressive disease >or=2 years from initial diagnosis, had an estimated 5-year survival of 30% (vs. 7% estimated 5-year survival with an earlier recurrence). No statistical difference was detected between patients whose disease recurred <1 year and between 1 and 2 years from initial diagnosis. A stepwise relative risk model and backwards stepwise regression was used to explore factors significantly associated with risk for post-recurrence death. Significant risk factors for death after recurrence included recurrence at combined local and distant sites, elevated LDH at initial diagnosis and initial recurrence less than 2 years after diagnosis. Isolated pulmonary recurrence was not predictive of survival after recurrence. Patients with a longer disease control interval represent the subset of patients most likely to survive following recurrence of EWS. All patients with recurrence would benefit from collaborative trials to investigate new therapeutic options.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 09/2008; 51(3):334-8. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of two cycles of high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in patients with poor prognosis Ewing family of tumors (EFT). Twenty patients with primary metastatic bulky disease or recurrent EFT were enrolled to a treatment protocol with two cycles of HDT and HSCT. Patients tolerated well the first (n=20) and second (n=13) cycles, with limited and predictable toxicities. Only one (5%) TRM occurred during the second cycle. Myeloid engraftment occurred at the median of 11 days after both cycles. At 3 years, the overall and EFS were 45% (confidence interval; CI 0.22, 0.69) and 47% (CI 0.25, 0.70), respectively, for the entire group and 58% (CI 0.30, 0.86) for patients who completed two cycles. Dose intensification with two cycles of HDT and HSCT is feasible and safe, with low and acceptable treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Adding a second course of therapy does not impair engraftment. However, only 65% of the patients were able to proceed to the second cycle. Further studies are required to define the optimal mode of delivery of HDT and HSCT in treatment of advanced EFT.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 07/2008; 42(5):311-8. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the use of alternating cycles of cyclophosphamide/etoposide and carboplatin/etoposide in children entered on National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-5 who were diagnosed between August 1, 1995 and May 31, 2002 and who relapsed after chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin D, and doxorubicin (VAD) and radiation therapy (DD-4A). One hundred three patients who relapsed or had progressive disease after initial VAD chemotherapy and radiation therapy were registered on stratum C of the NWTS-5 Relapse protocol. Twelve patients were not evaluable: five due to insufficient data, six due to major protocol violations, and one for refusal of therapy. Among the 91 remaining patients, 14 with stage V Wilms tumor (WT), 1 with contralateral relapse, and 16 who did not achieve a complete response (CR) to the initial three-drug chemotherapy were not included in this analysis. Relapse treatment included alternating courses of the drug pairs cyclophosphamide/etoposide and carboplatin/etoposide, surgery, and radiation therapy. The outcomes of 60 patients were analyzed. The lung was the only site of relapse for 33 patients; other sites of relapse included the operative bed, the abdomen, and liver. Four-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 42.3 and 48.0% respectively for all patients and were 48.9 and 52.8% for those who relapsed in the lungs only. Thrombocytopenia was the most frequent toxicity. These results demonstrate that approximately one-half of children with unilateral WT who relapse after initial treatment with VAD and radiation therapy can be successfully retreated.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 03/2008; 50(2):236-41. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) of bone with metastases at diagnosis remains poor despite new approaches to treatment. We evaluated whether a dose-intensity chemotherapy regimen improved survival for patients with ESFTs of bone with metastases at diagnosis. We entered 60 patients with metastatic ESFTs of bone onto a single arm trial of a new intensive therapy. Treatment consisted of 51-weeks of chemotherapy and local control of the primary with radiation, surgery, or both. The chemotherapeutic protocol included two alternating blocks: one with vincristine (2 mg/m(2)), doxorubicin (90 mg/m(2)), and cyclophosphamide (2,200 mg/m(2)); and the second with ifosfamide (2,800 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days) and etoposide (100 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days). Of the 60 patients with metastatic ESFTs of bone enrolled onto this single arm trial, 12 had metastasis to lung only, 7 to bone marrow or bone only, 38 to multiple sites, 2 in other sites and 3 not specified. There were three toxic deaths. Six patients (6-year cumulative incidence: 9%) developed second malignant neoplasms and died. The 6-year overall event-free survival (EFS) was 28% (standard error (SE) 6%) and survival (S) was 29% (SE 6%). An intensified treatment regimen using higher doses of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin increased toxicity and risk of second malignancy without improving EFS and S.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 01/2008; 49(7):894-900. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NWTS-5 was a multi-institutional clinical trial for patients less than 16 years of age at diagnosis with specific renal neoplasms who were diagnosed between August 1, 1995 and May 31, 2002. A uniform approach to the treatment of patients with relapse was employed. Seventy-two patients who relapsed after immediate nephrectomy (stages I and II), initial chemotherapy with vincristine (VCR) and actinomycin D and no radiation therapy were registered on stratum B of the NWTS-5 relapse protocol. Four patients were not evaluable: one due to insufficient data and three due to major protocol violations. Among the 68 remaining patients, one who was 19 years of age at initial diagnosis of Wilms tumor, five with bilateral Wilms tumor at diagnosis, three who developed a contralateral relapse, and one with persistent disease were not included in this analysis. Relapse treatment included surgical excision, when feasible, radiation therapy and alternating courses of VCR, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide and etoposide and cyclophosphamide. The outcomes of 58 patients were analyzed. The lung was the only site of relapse for 31 patients. Event-free survival 4 years after relapse was 71.1% and 4-year overall survival was 81.8% for all patients and were 67.8 and 81.0% for those who relapsed only to their lungs. The most frequent toxicities were hematological. These results demonstrate that a significant proportion of children with Wilms tumor who relapse after initial treatment with VCR and actinomycin D can be successfully re-treated.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 06/2007; 48(5):493-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study describes the magnitude of risk of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML) in 578 individuals diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma and enrolled on Children's Oncology Group therapeutic protocol, INT-0091. Between 1988 and 1992, patients with or without metastatic disease were randomized to receive doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin (regimen A) or these 4 drugs alternating with etoposide and ifosfamide (regimen B). Between 1992 and 1994, patients with metastatic disease were nonrandomly assigned to receive high-intensity therapy (regimen C: regimen B therapy with higher doses of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide). Median age at diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma was 12 years, and median length of follow-up, 8 years. Eleven patients developed t-MDS/AML, resulting in a cumulative incidence of 2% at 5 years. While patients treated on regimens A and B were at a low risk for development of t-MDS/AML (cumulative incidence: 0.4% and 0.9% at 5 years, respectively), patients treated on regimen C were at a 16-fold increased risk of developing t-MDS/AML (cumulative incidence: 11% at 5 years), when compared with those treated on regimen A. Increasing exposure to ifosfamide from 90 to 140 g/m2, cyclophosphamide from 9.6 to 17.6 g/m2, and doxorubicin from 375 to 450 mg/m2 increased the risk of t-MDS/AML significantly.
    Blood 02/2007; 109(1):46-51. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of the modality used for local control of Ewing sarcoma is uncertain. We investigated the relationship between the type of local control modality, surgery, radiation (RT) or both (S + RT), and subsequent risk for local failure (LF) in patients with nonmetastatic pelvic Ewing sarcoma treated on INT-0091. Patients < or = 30 years with Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor or primitive sarcoma of bone were randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy with doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin, (VACA) or with these four drugs alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide (VACA-IE). The local control modality, surgery, RT or both was chosen by the treating physicians. The effect of local control modality was assessed after adjusting for the size of tumor (< 8 cm, > or = 8 cm) and chemotherapy type. Seventy-five patients with pelvic tumors and a median follow-up of 4.4 years (0.6 to 11.4 years) comprised the study population. Twelve underwent surgery, 44 received RT, and 19 received both. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and cumulative incidence of LF was 49% and 21% (16%, LF only; 5%, LF and distant failure). There was no significant difference in EFS or LF by tumor size (< 8 cm, > or = 8 cm), local control (LC) modality, or chemotherapy. However, VACA-IE seems to confer an LC benefit (11% v 30%; P = .06). There was no significant effect of local control modality (surgery, RT or S + RT) selected by the treating physicians on rates of local failure or EFS. However, VACA-IE improves LC (11%) compared with previously published results for pelvic Ewing sarcoma.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2006; 24(24):3838-43. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - BIOL BLOOD MARROW TRANSPLANT. 01/2006; 12(2):96-96.
  • International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics 09/2004; 60(1). · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One hundred twenty patients with metastatic Ewing's sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of bone were entered onto a randomized trial evaluating whether the addition of ifosfamide and etoposide to vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin improved outcomes. Thirty-two patients had metastases to lungs only, 12 patients had metastases to bone marrow or bones only, 64 patients had metastases in multiple sites, and five patients had metastases in other sites; seven patients could not be assessed precisely. Treatment comprised 9 weeks of chemotherapy before local control and 42 weeks of chemotherapy; thereafter, regimen A consisted of vincristine 2 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide 1,200 mg/m(2), and either doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) or dactinomycin 1.25 mg/m(2). Regimen B consisted of regimen A alternating every 3 weeks with ifosfamide 1,800 mg/m(2)/d for 5 days and etoposide 100 mg/m(2)/d for 5 days. Patients treated on regimen B did not have significantly better survival than those treated on regimen A. The event-free survival (EFS) and survival (S) at 8 years were 20% (SE, 5%) and 32% (SE, 6%), respectively, for those treated on regimen A and 20% (SE, 6%) and 29% (SE, 6%), respectively, for those treated on regimen B. Patients who had only lung metastases had EFS and S of 32% (SE, 8%) and 41% (SE, 9%), respectively, at 8 years. There were six toxic deaths (5%), four from cardiac toxicity and two from sepsis (four treated on regimen B and two treated on regimen A). Two had second malignant neoplasms. Adding ifosfamide and etoposide to standard therapy does not improve outcomes of patients with Ewing's sarcoma or PNET of bone with metastases at diagnosis.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2004; 22(14):2873-6. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish outcome and optimal timing of local control for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) of the chest wall. Patients < or =30 years of age with ES/PNET of the chest wall were entered in 2 consecutive protocols. Therapy included multiagent chemotherapy; local control was achieved by resection, radiotherapy, or both. We compared completeness of resection and disease-free survival in patients undergoing initial surgical resection versus those treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection, radiotherapy, or both. Patients with a positive surgical margin received radiotherapy. Ninety-eight (11.3%) of 869 patients had primary tumors of the chest wall. Median follow-up was 3.47 years and 5-year event-free survival was 56% for the chest wall lesions. Ten of 20 (50%) initial resections resulted in negative margins compared with 41 of 53 (77%) negative margins with delayed resections after chemotherapy (P = 0.043). Event-free survival did not differ by timing of surgery (P = 0.69) or type of local control (P = 0.17). Initial chemotherapy decreased the percentage of patients needing radiation therapy. Seventeen of 24 patients (70.8%) with initial surgery received radiotherapy compared with 34 of 71 patients (47.9%) who started with chemotherapy (P = 0.061). If a delayed operation was performed, excluding those patients who received only radiotherapy for local control, only 25 of 62 patients needed radiotherapy (40.3%; P = 0.016). The likelihood of complete tumor resection with a negative microscopic margin and consequent avoidance of external beam radiation and its potential complications is increased with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and delayed resection of chest wall ES/PNET.
    Annals of Surgery 10/2003; 238(4):563-7; discussion 567-8. · 6.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ewing's sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone are closely related, highly malignant tumors of children, adolescents, and young adults. A new drug combination, ifosfamide and etoposide, was highly effective in patients with Ewing's sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone who had a relapse after standard therapy. We designed a study to test whether the addition of these drugs to a standard regimen would improve the survival of patients with newly diagnosed disease. Patients 30 years old or younger with Ewing's sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone, or primitive sarcoma of bone were eligible. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 49 weeks of standard chemotherapy with doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin or experimental therapy with these four drugs alternating with courses of ifosfamide and etoposide. A total of 518 patients met the eligibility requirements. Of 120 patients with metastatic disease, 62 were randomly assigned to the standard-therapy group and 58 to the experimental-therapy group. There was no significant difference in five-year event-free survival between the treatment groups (P=0.81). Among the 398 patients with nonmetastatic disease, the mean (+/-SE) five-year event-free survival among the 198 patients in the experimental-therapy group was 69+/-3 percent, as compared with 54+/-4 percent among the 200 patients in the standard-therapy group (P=0.005). Overall survival was also significantly better among patients in the experimental-therapy group (72+/-3.4 percent vs. 61+/-3.6 percent in the standard-therapy group, P=0.01). The addition of ifosfamide and etoposide to a standard regimen does not affect the outcome for patients with metastatic disease, but it significantly improves the outcome for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing's sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone, or primitive sarcoma of bone.
    New England Journal of Medicine 03/2003; 348(8):694-701. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the time to hematologic recovery (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] > or = 1,000/mm3 and platelet count > or = 100,000/mm3) in a randomized prospective study of two doses of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (5.0 vs. 10.0 microg/kg per day) after ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) chemotherapy; and 2) to determine the response rate (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]) of ICE in children with refractory or recurrent solid tumors. From June 1992 until November 1994, 123 patients with recurrent or refractory pediatric solid tumors were treated with ifosfamide (1,800 mg/m2 per day x 5), carboplatin (400 mg/m2 per day x 2), and etoposide (100 mg/m2 per day x 5) and randomized to receive either 5.0 microg/kg per day or 10.0 microg/kg per day of G-CSF subcutaneously until recovery of ANC to > or = 1,000/mm3. The incidence of grade 4 neutropenia during the first course was 88%. Median time from the start of chemotherapy to ANC > or = 1,000/mm(-3) for all patients during courses 1 and 2 was 21 and 19 days, respectively. The incidence of developing platelet count < or = 20,000/mm3 during course 1 was 82%. The median time from the start of the course of chemotherapy to platelet recovery > or =100,000/mm3 for all patients during courses 1 and 2 was 27 days. There was no significant difference in the median time of ANC recovery, platelet recovery, or incidence of grade 4 neutropenia; and in the median days of fever and the incidence of infections requiring hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics during courses 1 and 2, there was no significant difference between the two doses of G-CSF. One hundred eighteen patients were evaluated for response to ICE. The overall response rate (CR + PR) in this study was 51% (90% confidence interval, 43%-59%). The CR rate for all diagnostic categories was 27%. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of 1-year and 2-year survival probabilities for all patients were 52% and 30%, respectively. In summary, this combination of chemotherapy (ICE) was associated with a high CR rate (27%) in children with recurrent or refractory solid tumors, but also with a high incidence of grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Doubling the dose of G-CSF from 5.0 to 10.0 microg/kg per day after ICE chemotherapy did not result in an enhancement of neutrophil or platelet recovery or the incidence of grade 4 neutropenia developing.
    Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 01/2001; 23(1):30-8. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 71 children with sarcomas were treated in a prospective pilot study to determine whether granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) permits compression of the interval between chemotherapy cycles. Patients had Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, non-rhabdo soft tissue sarcomas or other advanced soft tissue tumours. The chemotherapy alternated vincristine-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide-etoposide, with G-CSF between courses. Therapy had two phases: induction (six cycles) and continuation (six cycles), which included primary tumour treatment with surgery and/or radiation. Chemotherapy cycles began every 14 days, or upon absolute neutrophil count (ANC) and platelet count recovery. The median chemotherapy cycle interval was 16 (11-48) days in the induction phase, with a median average relative dose intensification (ARDI) of 1.27 compared with every-21-day therapy. In the continuation phase, the median cycle interval was 21 days, with a median ARDI of 1.10. Radiation therapy prolonged chemotherapy intervals, whilst erythropoietin shortened them. Toxicity was modest for such chemotherapy. Event-free survival is comparable with or superior to that in recent large studies. G-CSF permits intensification of this regimen through interval compression. The impact of this approach on efficacy remains to be determined in a randomised trial.
    European Journal of Cancer 02/2000; 36(1):87-94. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare soft tissue tumor of primitive origin occurring primarily in children and young adults. Based on published reports in the literature, the response to conventional chemotherapy is poor. We report three pediatric patients successfully treated with dose-intensive, multimodal therapy. Between August 1994 and March 1998, we evaluated three consecutive patients with DSRCT at Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. We established the diagnosis based on clinical presentation, radiologic staging, and pathologic review with immunohistochemical staining. All patients received a combined modality protocol including dose-intensive chemotherapy (two of them with peripheral blood stem cell [PBSC] support), second look surgery, and consolidative local irradiation. The patients remain in continuous remission at 66, 42, and 26 months after diagnosis, respectively. Two of our patients were younger than any previously reported patient, extending the age group for which DSRCT should be considered on diagnosis of small round cell tumors. The uniform survival achieved in our series indicates potential benefit for the combination of dose-intensive multiagent chemotherapy, local irradiation, and aggressive surgical approach in this disease.
    Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 01/2000; 22(5):446-50. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To improve the prognosis for pediatric patients with metastatic sarcomas, including the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and undifferentiated sarcoma (UDS), we tested the feasibility of a brief, intensive regimen of chemotherapy that maximizes dose intensity. Twenty-four children and adolescents with metastatic sarcomas received VACIME chemotherapy, consisting of eight courses of vincristine 2 mg/m(2) on day 0; doxorubicin 20 mg/m(2)/day on days 0-3; cyclophosphamide 360 mg/m(2)/day on days 0-4; ifosfamide 1,800 mg/m(2)/day on days 0-4; mesna 2,400 mg/m(2)/day; and etoposide 100 mg/m(2)/day on days 0-4. Doxorubicin was omitted in courses 7 and 8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was used routinely following each course of therapy. Courses of therapy were repeated every 21 days or as soon as hematopoietic recovery and resolution of nonhematopoietic toxicities permitted. Surgical resection followed course 6, and radiotherapy followed the completion of all therapy. Thirteen patients achieved a complete response (CR) with chemotherapy alone, and seven more achieved a CR following surgical resection after course 6 (overall CR rate 83%). There was one toxic death. Thirteen patients developed progressive disease, with 2- and 4-year event-free survivals (95% confidence interval) of 50% (30-70%) and 45% (25-65%), respectively. Myelosuppression was severe and cumulative, leading to dose reductions and chemotherapy interval delays. Mucositis was the most common nonhematopoietic toxicity. VACIME chemotherapy was a feasible dose-intensive regimen for pediatric patients with metastatic sarcomas. Cumulative hematopoietic toxicity and severe mucositis limited the delivery of chemotherapy as prescribed. The CR and 2-year event-free survival rates were superior to those of most previously reported regimens.
    Medical and Pediatric Oncology 01/2000; 34(1):29-38.
  • European Journal of Cancer 01/2000; 36(1). · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We sought to establish the outcome and optimal therapeutic sequence for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall. Methods: Patients 30 years of age or younger with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the bone were randomly assigned to receive vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin or those drugs alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide. Local control was obtained with an operation, radiotherapy, or both. Results: Fifty-three (13.4%) of 393 patients had primary tumors of the chest wall (all rib). Event-free survival at 5 years was 57% for the chest wall compared with 61% for other sites (P > .2). Ifosfamide and etoposide improved outcome in the overall group (5-year event-free survival, 68% vs 54%; P = .002), and a similar trend occurred in chest wall lesions (5-year event-free survival, 64% vs 51%). Patients with chest wall lesions had more attempts at initial surgical resection (30%) than those with other primary tumor sites (8%, P < .01). The attempt at initial resection for chest wall lesions did not correlate with size. Initial resections at other sites were restricted to smaller tumors. Initial resection resulted in negative pathologic margins in 6 of 16 patients, whereas the delayed resection resulted in negative margins in 17 of 24 patients (P = .05). Although there was no difference in survival by timing of the operation in rib lesions, a higher percentage of patients with initial surgical resection received radiation than those with resection after initial chemotherapy (P = .13). Conclusions: Although rib primary tumors are significantly larger than tumors found in other sites, their outcome is similar. We favor delayed resection whenever possible to minimize the number of patients requiring radiation therapy. (J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2000;119:1154-61)
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 01/2000; 119(6):1154-1161. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over 50% of patients with newly diagnosed rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are in the 'intermediate risk' group with a 3-year progression-free survival of approximately 65%. This group consists of stage 1, group III, non-orbit tumours; stage 2, group II and III; and all stage 3 patients utilising the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) staging system. The role of doxorubicin in the treatment of RMS has been controversial. Ifosfamide, both alone and in combination with etoposide, has significant activity in patients with RMS. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy and toxicity of a chemotherapy regimen of alternating cycles of vincristine/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide and etoposide/ifosfamide for intermediate risk RMS. 30 patients with intermediate risk RMS or undifferentiated sarcoma (US) were treated with alternating cycles of vincristine/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (VDC) and etoposide/ifosfamide (EI) at planned intervals of 3 weeks. Local treatment of the tumour in most cases was performed after four cycles of chemotherapy, followed by an additional 10 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of 3-year event-free survival was 85% (95% confidence interval 72-99%). The overall survival at 3 years was 91% (95% confidence interval 80-100%). No patient died from toxicity. The most common toxicity was febrile neutropenia in 35% of VDC and 26% of EI cycles. No nephrotoxicity or cardiac toxicity was seen. No patient progressed prior to week 12 local therapy. Alternating cycles of VDC and EI are an effective treatment for patients with intermediate risk RMS and US. Toxicity is tolerable. Delaying local treatment until week 12 does not compromise outcome.
    European Journal of Cancer 08/1998; 34(8):1224-9. · 5.06 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
481.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Dallas, TX, United States
  • 1998–2007
    • City of Hope National Medical Center
      Duarte, California, United States
    • University of Washington Seattle
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2003
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2000
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
      • Division of Oncology
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 1989–1998
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • 1997
    • Methodist Hospitals
      Gary, Indiana, United States
  • 1986–1995
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Pediatric Oncology Branch
      • • Radiation Oncology Branch
      Maryland, United States
  • 1991–1992
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Scottsdale, AZ, United States
    • University of Southern California
      Los Angeles, California, United States
    • Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
      • Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 1986–1992
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Laboratory of Pathology
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 1988
    • NCI-Frederick
      • Laboratory of Pathology
      Maryland, United States
  • 1983
    • The Ohio State University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 1980
    • Columbus State University
      Columbus, Georgia, United States