M J Montoya

Hospital Rafael Méndez de Lorca, Lorca, Murcia, Spain

Are you M J Montoya?

Claim your profile

Publications (42)60.57 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The attitude of health care personnel is fundamental for the procurement of organs, especially when they are based in transplant-related services. The objective of this study is to assess the attitude of hospital personnel in transplant-related services toward living kidney donation in a hospital with a cadaveric and living solid organ transplant program. A random sample was taken and stratified by type of service and job category (n = 330) in transplant-related services (procurement units, transplant units and follow-up units). The attitude toward cadaveric organ donation was evaluated using a validated psychosocial questionnaire. Student's t test, chi(2) test, and logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. The questionnaire completion rate was 94% (n = 309). Most respondents (87%, n = 268) are in favor of related living kidney donation. However, only 17% (n = 53) of respondents are in favor if this donation is unrelated. Of the rest, 4% (n = 12) of respondents would not accept a donated living kidney organ and the remaining 9% (n = 29) are undecided. Only two variables are significantly related to attitude towards living kidney donation: age (p = 0.013) and a willingness to receive a donated living organ on the part of the respondent, if a transplant organ were needed (p < 0.001). Both variables persist as significant independent variables in the logistic regression analysis. There is also a close relationship between attitude toward living kidney donation and attitude toward living liver donation (p < 0.001). The personnel in donation and transplantation units tend to have a favorable attitude towards living kidney donation making them a key element in the current promotion of living kidney donation. Moreover, the youngest workers in these units are those who tend to be more in favor, thus offering a promising future for this type of kidney donation which is becoming more of a necessity given the cadaveric organ deficit.
    Nephron Clinical Practice 01/2008; 108(1):c75-82. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Living liver donation is becoming a more widely accepted practice given the decrease in donor morbidity and mortality and the beneficial results in the recipient. Use of this technique is unusual in Spain. There are a number of workers against its use within the health care system. The objective of this study was to analyze attitudes toward and the variables that affect them concerning living liver donation among surgical services in a transplant hospital. A random survey was stratified by surgical area and job category in a Spanish third-level hospital with an ongoing solid organ transplant program. Attitudes toward living liver donation were assessed using a questionnaire about organ donation and transplantation that evaluated various psychosocial variables. Student's t test and the chi square test were used. A total of 263 workers were surveyed (mean age as 40 +/- 9 years). Regarding attitudes toward living liver donation, the level of acceptance was 80% (n = 211) of respondents, whereas 10% were undecided (n = 26), and another 10% were against (n = 26), assuming that the donations were related. When we asked about unrelated living donation, the percentage in favor decreased to 10% (n = 27). No differences were found with respect to job category or type of service. The variables that are related to such an attitude are the following: (1) possibility of respondent needing an organ (P = .001); (2) favorable attitude toward living kidney donation (P < .000); and (3) a belief that medical errors exist (P = .004). An important finding was that attitudes toward living liver donation were not more favorable according to whether the respondent was in favor or against cadaveric organ donation (P = .175). There was a highly favorable attitude toward living liver donation among hospital personnel in surgical services, which is an important factor to take into account if this type of donation is to be encouraged in Spain.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2007; 39(7):2079-82. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A considerable percentage of hospital personnel are against organ donation, which at a crucial time could act as an obstacle to donation. Moreover, there is often a lack of training of personnel necessary for them to provide accurate information about organ donation and transplantation. Our objective was to determine the acceptability of a training course about organ donation among hospital workers in a center with an ongoing solid organ transplant program. A random sample (n = 1168) was stratified by type of service and job category among workers in hospital services within an organ transplant program. An evaluation was made of attitudes toward donation and acceptance of a training course using a validated psychosocial questionnaire. Distribution of the survey was made by the head of each service and job category. The survey was completed anonymously and self-administered. Sixty-nine percent (n = 808) of respondents were in favor of donating their own organs. With respect to the benefit of a training course about organ donation and transplantation, 50% (n = 584) of respondents considered it to be a useful idea, whereas 15% (n = 176) did not, and 35% (n = 408) were not sure. An important finding was that 56% (n = 452) of those who are in favor of donation would take part in the course compared to only 37% (n = 132) of those who were against or undecided. There was a significant relationship between those workers who believed that the training course will be of use and the following factors: younger age (P = .000); women (P = .000); single (P = .000); nursing job category (P = .000); a temporary contract (P = .012); a worker in nonsurgical services (P = .000); prior understanding of the concept of brain death (P = .003); favoring cadaveric organ donation (P = .000); performing pro-social voluntary type activities (P = .000); discussions of organ donation and transplantation within the family (P = .022); Catholic religion (P = .001); a partner in favor of organ donation and transplantation (P = .001); and a belief that he may need a transplant (P = .000). A training course about organ donation and transplantation might be useful given that only half of the workers would be prepared to take part and with respect to the target population, only 37% of them stating that they would participate. Its main use would be to reinforce the positive attitude of those who are already in favor and increase their knowledge about the subject. What is more, if these workers received adequate training they would serve to promote donation both directly and indirectly to the general public and other hospital personnel.
    Transplantation Proceedings 07/2007; 39(5):1310-3. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The attitude of health-care personnel is fundamental for the procurement of transplant organs, especially in those services that are related to transplantation. The objective of this study is to find out the attitude towards living liver donation among personnel who work in transplant-related services in a hospital with a cadaveric and living organ transplant programme. A random sample was taken and stratified by type of service and job category (N=330), in services related to transplantation (procurement units, transplant units and follow-up units). Attitude was evaluated using a validated psychosocial questionnaire. Control group: a random sample of personnel in clinical services that do not have any direct contact with solid organ transplantation. Student's t-test and the chi(2) test complemented by a logistical regression analysis were applied in the statistical analysis. The questionnaire completion rate was 94% (N=309). Only 10% (N=31) of respondents are in favour of living liver donation if it is unrelated, but another 67% (N=207) are in favour if donation were for a relative. Of the rest, 11% (N=33) do not agree with living liver donation and the remaining 12% (N=38) are undecided. In the control group, attitude towards living liver donation is favourable in 82% (N=344) (P=0.0908). An analysis of the variables that influence attitude shows that the following factors are significantly related: (1) age (P=0.037); (2) a respondent's belief that he or she may need a transplant in the future (P=0.013); and (3) if it were necessary, a willingness to receive a donated living liver organ (P=0.000). Of the variables that have the most influence on attitude towards living liver donation in the bivariate analysis, there are two variables that are statistically significant in the multivariate analysis: (1) age and (2) willingness to accept a donated living liver organ from a relative if it were needed (OR=14.19). There is also a close relationship between attitude towards living liver donation and attitude towards living kidney donation (P=0.000) There is a favourable attitude towards living liver donation among personnel in units related to the transplantation and donation process, although it is less favourable than expected. Therefore, it will be necessary to increase this level of acceptance and to improve information about the matter if we want to encourage living liver donation. The youngest workers in these units are those who are most in favour, which leads us to believe that there is a hopeful future for this type of liver donation that is so necessary given the cadaveric organ deficit.
    Liver international: official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver 07/2007; 27(5):687-93. · 3.87 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is important to find out about the social acceptance of xenotransplantation, especially in populations where there are pre-clinical xenotransplantation projects, and therefore the possibility of xenotransplantation to humans. In the native population of southeastern Spain this situation is well-known, but in recent years there has been an important social change because of a considerable migrational flow into Spain, especially from the British Isles. To analyze the attitude toward xenotransplantation among the population living in southeastern Spain born in the British Isles and to determine the variables that affect this attitude. A random sample was taken of British and Irish citizens resident in southeast Spain and stratified according to a respondent's nationality (n = 1700). The data were obtained between November 2005 and April 2006. Attitude was evaluated using a validated questionnaire that was completed anonymously and self-administered. The control group comprised a random sample (n = 250) of the native population. Student's t-test, the chi-squared test, Fischer's exact test and a logistic regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis. The questionnaire completion rate was 91% (n = 1546), with 69% of respondents in favor of xenotransplantation, 8% against and 23% unsure, an attitude that is similar to that of the control group (P = 0.1616). These attitudes were based on the assumption that transplanted animal organs had the same outcomes and involved the same risks as human ones. This attitude is related to the following factors: (i) being of male sex (P = 0.0477); (ii) level of education (P = 0.012); (iii) being natives from England or Wales (P = 0.016); (iv) participation in voluntary pro-social activities (P = 0.035); (v) the respondent's religion (P < 0.001); (vi) knowing that one's religion has a favorable attitude toward transplantation (P < 0.001); (vii) having discussed the subject of organ donation and transplantation within the family (P < 0.001); (viii) a partner's favorable attitude toward transplantation (P < 0.001); (ix) previous experience of donation or transplantation (P = 0.024); (x) the belief that in the future one might need a transplant (P = 0.007) and (xi) a favorable attitude toward human donation, both deceased and living (P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the following are significant independent variables: sex [odds ratio (OR) = 2.206], a favorable attitude toward deceased donation (OR = 1.977), and attitude toward living donation (OR = 2.097). Attitude toward xenotransplantation among British residents who usually live in the southeast of Spain is similar to that of the native Spanish population, and is determined by many psychosocial factors, mainly related to previous attitude toward the different types of human organ donation and the respondent's sex.
    Xenotransplantation 05/2007; 14(3):255-64. · 2.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many factors can cause morbidity and mortality in patients with severe acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). The objectives of this study are to analyze three aspects related to severe acute LGIB: (1) indications and prognostic factors for urgent surgery, (2) risk factors for morbidity and mortality, and (3) relapse rates. A retrospective cohort was collected between 1985 and 2002 in a tertiary referral center. One hundred seventy-one patients with severe acute LGIB were reviewed (LGIB is defined as frank rectal bleeding either with a hematocrit decrease >/=10 points or when a transfusion of at least three units of concentrated red blood cells is needed). The main outcome measures are: (1) indications for urgent surgery and results, (2) morbidity and mortality, and (3) relapse. There were 158 (92%) stable patients, and in 61% of these, the bleeding was identified via colonoscopy. Bleeding was identified using urgent colonoscopy in a higher percentage of patients compared to delayed colonoscopy (68% versus 14%; p < 0.001). Urgent surgery was indicated in 24 (14%) patients, and the approach was peri-anal in 5 (21%) patients and abdominal in the rest. Local intestinal resection was performed on the 15 patients in which bleeding was identified, whereas a subtotal colectomy was performed on the remaining 4 patients. The presence of hypotension (p = 0.001; 35 versus 10%) and etiology of LGIB (p < 0.001) are prognostic factors of urgent surgery. Morbidity was 6.4%, and mortality was 4.7%. The only morbidity or mortality risk factors detected were the presence of associated comorbidities (p = 0.008) and the need for urgent surgery (p = 0.002). The most frequent etiology was diverticulosis (25%). After a mean follow-up of 132 +/- 75 months, bleeding relapsed in 30% of patients. It is difficult to predict which patients are going to need urgent surgery in severe acute LGIB; only the presence of hypotension on arrival at the emergency ward would lead us to suspect a negative outcome for the hemorrhage. In severe acute LGIB, morbidity and mortality is high, and this is mainly due to the high level of associated comorbidity and the need for urgent surgery. It is necessary for strict hemodynamic monitoring of the patients at risk if we want to improve outcomes. The bleeding relapse rate is high in LGIB, although generally, it is not severe.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 04/2007; 392(2):165-71. · 1.89 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mortality on the waiting list for liver transplants is high. Consequently, alternatives such as living donation are being sought. Therefore, one of the aspects that should be improved is the attitude of healthcare professionals toward this type of donation in order to create a favorable climate. The objective of this study was to identify attitudes toward living liver donation among physicians in a hospital with a living donor liver transplant program and to analyze the variables that affect these attitudes. A random sample stratified by type of service (n = 369) was performed among physicians in the hospital. Attitudes were evaluated using a survey validated in our geographical area. In each service, the head of service, or in their absence, an attending physician, was contacted. This person was given an explanation of the study and was made responsible for distributing the questionnaire in selected work shifts. The questionnaire was completed anonymously and was self-administered. Statistical analysis consisted of chi2 test, Student's t-test, and a logistic regression analysis. The survey completion rate was 93% (n = 345). Of those surveyed, 15% (n = 52) were in favor of living liver donation whether related or unrelated. This percentage increased to 85% (n = 292) if donation was related. Of the remainder, 8% (n = 27) did not accept living liver donation and the remaining 7% (n = 26) were undecided. This attitude was associated with only two factors: the respondent's belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (p = 0.003) -90% of those who believed that they might need a transplant at some point in the future were in favor-, and the respondent's acceptance (if transplantation were necessary at some point in the future) of a living donated liver from a family member or a friend (p = 0.000). Thus, 96% of those who would be prepared to accept a living organ were in favor. In the multivariate analysis, both variables remained significant: the respondent's belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36) and, if this were the case, the respondent's acceptance of a living donated liver (OR = 7.11). Attitudes toward living liver donation among physicians in a hospital with a living donor transplant program were highly favorable. Consequently, these health professionals may be a key element for the promotion of living donation at the present time when this form of donation is being encouraged to avoid mortality on waiting lists.
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología 01/2007; 29(10):597-601. · 0.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IntroductionBecause of the shortage of kidney organs available for transplantation and the favorable outcomes described in living donation, this type of donation is necessity in Spain. However, living donation has yet to be developed and this may be partly because hospital personnel do not have an entirely favorable attitude toward this type of donation. The objective of this study was to analyze attitudes toward living kidney donation among health workers in services that are not usually in contact with transplantation services in a hospital with a cadaveric and living donor solid organ transplant program.
    Diálisis y Trasplante. 01/2007; 28(1).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ancillary hospital personnel represent an important body of opinion because as they work in a hospital their opinion has more credibility for the general public as a result of their activity in hospitals. However, in most cases they do not have any health care training which means that their attitude could be based on a lack of knowledge or unfounded fears. The objective of this study is to analyze the attitude toward living liver donation among ancillary personnel in a hospital with a cadaveric and living liver organ transplant program and to analyze the variables that might influence such attitude. A random sample was taken which was stratified by service (n=401) among ancillary personnel in the hospital. Attitude was evaluated using a survey that was validated in our geographical area. A representative from each service was contacted. This person was given an explanation of the study and was made responsible for the distribution of the questionnaire in selected work shifts. The survey was completed anonymously and was self-administered. The c2 test, Student s t-test and logistical regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis. The questionnaire completion rate was 94% (n=377). Of all the respondents, 20% (n=74) are in favor of donating a living hemi-liver, but an additional 62% (n=233) are in favor if donation is for a relative. Of the rest, 8% (n=30) do not accept this type of donation and the remaining 11% (n=40) are unsure. The following variables are related to attitude toward living liver donation: attitude toward cadaveric donation (p=0.002); a respondent s belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (p<0.001) and a willingness to receive a donated living liver if one were needed (p<0.001). In the multivariate analysis the following have been found to be significantly related variables: a) a respondent s belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (OR=1.5); and b) a willingness to receive a living donated kidney if one were needed (OR=16.2). Attitude toward living liver donation is fairly favorable among ancillary personnel in a transplant hospital and is not affected by the psychosocial factors found to be related to attitude toward donation in previous studies. However, if we want to encourage this type of transplantation with living donors it will be necessary to carry out informative campaigns to raise awareness within the hospital.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 12/2006; 98(12):917-28. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction Mortality on the waiting list for liver transplants is high. Consequently, alternatives such as living donation are being sought. Therefore, one of the aspects that should be improved is the attitude of healthcare professionals toward this type of donation in order to create a favorable climate. The objective of this study was to identify attitudes toward living liver donation among physicians in a hospital with a living donor liver transplant program and to analyze the variables that affect these attitudes. Patients and methods A random sample stratified by type of service (n = 369) was performed among physicians in the hospital. Attitudes were evaluated using a survey validated in our geographical area. In each service, the head of service, or in their absence, an attending physician, was contacted. This person was given an explanation of the study and was made responsible for distributing the questionnaire in selected work shifts. The questionnaire was completed anonymously and was self-administered. Statistical analysis consisted of χ2 test, Student’s t-test, and a logistic regression analysis. Results The survey completion rate was 93% (n = 345). Of those surveyed, 15% (n = 52) were in favor of living liver donation whether related or unrelated. This percentage increased to 85% (n = 292) if donation was related. Of the remainder, 8% (n = 27) did not accept living liver donation and the remaining 7% (n = 26) were undecided. This attitude was associated with only two factors: the respondent’s belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (p = 0.003) −90% of those who believed that they might need a transplant at some point in the future were in favor–, and the respondent’s acceptance (if transplantation were necessary at some point in the future) of a living donated liver from a family member or a friend (p = 0.000). Thus, 96% of those who would be prepared to accept a living organ were in favor. In the multivariate analysis, both variables remained significant: the respondent’s belief that he or she might need a transplant in the future (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36) and, if this were the case, the respondent’s acceptance of a living donated liver (OR = 7.11). Conclusions Attitudes toward living liver donation among physicians in a hospital with a living donor transplant program were highly favorable. Consequently, these health professionals may be a key element for the promotion of living donation at the present time when this form of donation is being encouraged to avoid mortality on waiting lists.
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología. 12/2006; 29(10).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective We hypothesized that healthcare assistants in our hospital should have a more favorable attitude toward xenotransplantation than the general public, given their more direct contact with a preclinical xenotransplantation program. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the attitudes of healthcare assistants in a hospital with a preclinical xenotransplantation program and to analyze the factors that influence these attitudes.
    Diálisis y Trasplante. 10/2006; 27(4).
  • Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 09/2006; 98(8):625-6. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In situations of extreme urgency when there is a need for vital organs, xenotransplantation could provide a bridge until the arrival of a human organ. However, it is important to find out the level of acceptance of this potential therapy among the health care workers who would be involved in its implementation. The objective of this study is to analyze attitude among personnel in a hospital with a pre-clinical xenotransplantation program toward xenotransplantation and to determine the variables that influence this attitude. A random sample (n=1168) was taken and stratified according to job category and service. Attitude toward xenotransplantation was evaluated using a validated questionnaire. Contact was made with the head of each service who was given an explanation of the project. This person was made responsible for the distribution and collection of the survey in each service in randomly selected work shifts. Such a survey was completed anonymously and was self-administered. A random sample of 250 individuals from our regional community was used as a control group. The survey completion rate was 98% (n=1148). Most respondents are in favor (67%), 7% are against and 26% undecided. Such an attitude is more favorable in the control group (74% vs. 67%; P=0.0378). The following factors are positively related to such an attitude: (1) male sex (P<0.0005); (2) a younger age (P=0.013); (3) participation in prosocial voluntary activities (P=0.002); (4) knowing that the church has a positive attitude toward donation and transplantation (P<0.0005); (5) a partner's favorable attitude toward transplantation (P<0.0005); (6) a physician's job category (P<0.0005); (7) a resident physician's job contract situation (P=0.017); (8) a respondent's belief that he or she may need a transplant in the future (P<0.0005); and (9) a favorable attitude toward human donation, whether this be cadaveric or living (P<0.0005). In the multivariate analysis, the following persist as independent variables: (1) sex (odds ratio=1.6); (2) participation in prosocial voluntary activities (odds ratio=2.2); (3) a partner's unfavorable attitude toward transplantation (odds ratio=0.3); (4) a favorable attitude toward cadaveric donation (odds ratio=2); and (5) attitude toward living liver donation (odds ratio=3.8). Attitude toward xenotransplantation is not as favorable among hospital personnel as it is in the general public and this is determined by many factors. It will be necessary for research groups to periodically carry out awareness-raising activities about our findings in our own centers, to avoid the rejection that could be generated by a lack of awareness.
    Xenotransplantation 09/2006; 13(5):447-54. · 2.57 Impact Factor
  • Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 07/2006; 98(6):480-2. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To reduce the number of family organ donation refusals, it is necessary not only to act on the general public but also on the health care system. In this respect, there are data suggesting that the percentage of hospital personnel against donation is high, especially among ancillary personnel. The objective herein was to analyze the attitudes of ancillary hospital professionals toward donation of their own organs and determine factors that conditioned such attitudes. A random sample in a third-level hospital with a solid organ transplant program was stratified by ancillary services: administrative, porters, maintenance, cleaning, and cooking. Attitudes toward donation of one's own organs after death were evaluated using a questionnaire on psychosocial aspects validated in our area. It included various psychosocial variables that could affect such attitudes. The Student t test and chi-square test were used to evaluate the data. We analyzed 277 respondents of mean age 43 +/- 8 years and 96% women. The level of acceptance of organ donation was 64% (n = 178), whereas 46% were either against or undecided (n = 98). The variables which determined the attitudes were understanding of brain death (P = .004); attitude toward cadaveric manipulation, especially toward autopsy (P = .013) and cremation (P = .004); concern about mutilation after donation (P = .014); religion (P = .032); partner's attitude toward donation (P < .0001); and possibility of needing an organ in the future (P = .031). Ancillary hospital personnel had similar attitudes toward donation as those of the general public as observed in other studies. The attitudes were determined by many psychosocial factors. A campaign to raise awareness among professionals has become a priority, given that working in a hospital, their unfavorable attitude could have a strong negative impact on the general public.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2006; 38(3):858-62. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The attitudes of health care personnel, specifically doctors, have a significant influence on public attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation. The objective herein was to analyze the attitudes of Primary Care (PC) doctors toward living organ donation and to determine the psychosocial factors that condition these attitudes. A random sample was stratified by geographical location (six health areas in our community) among PC doctors, including 155 respondents from 32 health centers. Attitudes toward donation were evaluated using a psychosocial questionnaire validated in our geographical area. Contact was made with the Doctor Coordinator in each center for distribution of the questionnaires, which were completed anonymously. The chi-square test and Student t test were applied to evaluate the data. When the living donor is not related, only 21% (n = 32) of PC doctors were in favor of living kidney donation, and only 20% (n = 31) for living liver donation (P > .05). In contrast, these percentages were 90% and 89% in favor of kidney and liver related donation, respectively. Upon analysis of the psychosocial variables affecting these attitudes, there was only an association with their partner's opinion (P = .009 for kidney and P = .000 for liver), and the possibility of needing a transplant oneself (P = .000). PC doctors have favorable attitudes toward related living donation. If living donation is promoted by transplant coordination units, such PC professionals could act as a source of positive information about the matter for the general public.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2006; 38(3):863-5. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The deficit in transplantable organs is making it necessary to find alternative sources. One possibility is xenotransplantation. However, the use of animal organs may be rejected by society and among health professionals. Primary Care is fundamental for promoting matters of health; in Spain it has access to nearly 100% of the population. Our objective was to analyze the acceptance of this therapy, although it is experimental, among Primary Care professionals, given that they are the ones most involved in spreading information about this therapy if it was confirmed to be useful. A random sample was stratified by sex, job category, and geographical location among Primary Care personnel, including 428 professionals in 32 health centers among population of 2851 professionals. Attitudes toward xenotransplantation were evaluated using a questionnaire on psychosocial attitudes validated in our geographical area. Contact was made in each center with the Doctor Coordinator for doctors, the Nursing Coordinator for nurses, and an Administrative Officer for ancillary personnel. The chi-square test and Student t test were applied to evaluate categorical and continuous data, respectively. Attitudes toward xenotransplantation were similar to those obtained in human organs: favorable in 79% (n = 325), whereas 19% (n = 78) had doubts and 2% (n = 10) were against. The attitude was more favorable in men (89% vs 72%; P < .000), those who had cared for transplant patients (84% vs 71%; P = .009), those with previous experience in organ donation and transplantation (84% vs 75%; P = .033), those with an attitude in favor of cadaveric organ donation (83% vs 66%; P < .0001), and those in favor of living donation of the kidney (P < .000) or the liver (P < .000), as well as those who believed that they may need a transplant at some time in the future (84% vs 74%; P = .045). There was a clear difference in attitude according to job category (P = .018): approval rates were 89% for doctors, 76% for nurses, and 70% for ancillary personnel. Attitudes toward future application of xenotransplantation were quite positive among doctors. However, the attitudes of nursing and ancillary personnel were similar to those of the general population. The main factors related to such an attitude depended mainly on the previous relationship and attitude of the respondent toward human organ donation and transplantation.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2006; 38(3):853-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (LGIH) is generally self-limiting, and the most frequent etiologies are located at colonic level. The objective here is to analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic handling of acute LGIH when its etiology was located in the small intestine. Between 1975 and March 2002, 12 acute cases of LGIH originating in the small intestine were admitted to our service. All consulted the hospital with acute rectorrhage, requiring a transfusion of at least 3 units of concentrated red blood cells. The mean age was 54 +/- 21 years, 58% were women, and 83% had experienced previous episodes of LGIH. in eleven cases (92%) an urgent lower and upper endoscopy was performed without locating the source of bleeding. An arteriography was indicated in 7 patients (58%), which located the bleeding origin in 5 of them. In two cases a scintigraphy was performed, showing a Meckel's diverticulum in one patient and a normal image in another. All were operated on; in 8 cases (67%), surgery was urgent; in 9 cases, a tumor was found, and in three additional patients, a case of Meckel's diverticulum was found, with a resection being carried out for all lesions. Histology showed a leiomyoma in 7 cases, a Meckel's diverticulum in 3 cases, a leiomyoblastoma in 1, and an angioma in the remaining case. After a mean follow-up of 132 +/- 75 months, the leiomyoblastoma resulted in death, and there was a relapse in the case of angioma, which was successfully embolized with interventional radiology. Acute LGIH originating in the small intestine should be considered a possible etiology when digestive endoscopy does not locate the source of bleeding, with arteriography being a useful diagnostic technique for bleeding localization. Surgery is the definitive treatment--it confirms the etiology and rules out the presence of malignancy.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 04/2006; 98(3):196-203. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors of postoperative acute renal failure (ARF) in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We reviewed 184 consecutive OLT. Postoperative ARF was defined as a persistent rise of 50% increase or more of the S-creatinine (S-Cr). The patients were classified as early postoperative ARF (E-ARF) (first week) and late postoperative ARF (L-ARF) (second to fourth week). Preoperative variables were age, sex, comorbidity, indication for OLT, Child-Pugh stage, united network for organ sharing status, analysis of the blood and urine, and donor's data. Intraoperative variables were systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac index, and systemic vascular resistance index. Surgical technique, number of blood products transfused, need for adrenergic agonist drugs, and intraoperative complications were also important. Postoperative variables were duration of stay in the intensive care unit, time on mechanic ventilation, liver graft dysfunction, need for adrenergic agonist drugs, units of blood products infused, episodes of acute rejection, re-operations, and bacterial infections. Firstly we carried out a univariate statistical analysis, and secondly a logistic regression analysis. The risk factors for E-ARF were: pretransplant ARF (odds ratio (OR)=10.2, P=0.025), S-albumin (OR=0.3, P=0.001), duration of treatment with dopamine (OR=1.6, P=0.001), and grade II-IV dysfunction of the liver graft (OR=5.6, P=0.002). The risk factors for L-ARF were: re-operation (OR=3.1, P=0.013) and bacterial infection (OR=2.9, P=0.017). The development of E-ARF is influenced by preoperative factors such as ARF and hypoalbuminemia, as well as postoperative factors such as liver dysfunction and prolonged treatment with dopamine. The predicting factors of L-ARF differ from E-ARF and correspond to postoperative causes such as bacterial infection and surgical re-operation.
    Kidney International 04/2006; 69(6):1073-80. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (LGIH) is generally self-limiting, and the most frequent etiologies are located at colonic level. The objective here is to analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic handling of acute LGIH when its etiology was located in the small intestine. Patients and methods: between 1975 and March 2002, 12 acute cases of LGIH originating in the small intestine were admitted to our service. All consulted the hospital with acute rectorrhage, requiring a transfusion of at least 3 units of concentrated red blood cells. The mean age was 54 ± 21 years, 58% were women, and 83% had experienced previous episodes of LGIH. Results: in eleven cases (92%) an urgent lower and upper endoscopy was performed without locating the source of bleeding. An arteriography was indicated in 7 patients (58%), which located the bleeding origin in 5 of them. In two cases a scintigraphy was performed, showing a Meckel's diverticulum in one patient and a normal image in another. All were operated on; in 8 cases (67%), surgery was urgent; in 9 cases, a tumor was found, and in three additional patients, a case of Meckel's diverticulum was found, with a resection being carried out for all lesions. Histology showed a leiomyoma in 7 cases, a Meckel's diverticulum in 3 cases, a leiomyoblastoma in 1, and an angioma in the remaining case. After a mean follow-up of 132 ± 75 months, the leiomyoblastoma resulted in death, and there was a relapse in the case of angioma, which was successfully embolized with interventional radiology. Conclusions: acute LGIH originating in the small intestine should be considered a possible etiology when digestive endoscopy does not locate the source of bleeding, with arteriography being a useful diagnostic technique for bleeding localization. Surgery is the definitive treatment - it confirms the etiology and rules out the presence of malignancy.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 03/2006; 98(3):196-203. · 1.65 Impact Factor