RICHARD A. LOCKEY

St Mary's University College, 트위크넘, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (7)9.86 Total impact

  • Jon E. Goodwin, Mark Glaister, Richard A. Lockey, Emma Payne
    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/2009; 41.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine supplementation on multiple sprint running performance. Methods: Using a randomized double-blind research design, 21 physically active men ingested a gelatin capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg·kg-1 body mass) or placebo (maltodextrin) 1 h before completing an indoor multiple sprint running trial (12 × 30 m; repeated at 35-s intervals). Venous blood samples were drawn to evaluate plasma caffeine and primary metabolite concentrations. Sprint times were recorded via twin-beam photocells, and earlobe blood samples were drawn to evaluate pretest and posttest lactate concentrations. Heart rate was monitored continuously throughout the tests, with RPE recorded after every third sprint. Results: Relative to placebo, caffeine supplementation resulted in a 0.06-s (1.4%) reduction in fastest sprint time (95% likely range = 0.04-0.09 s), which corresponded with a 1.2% increase in fatigue (95% likely range = 0.3-2.2%). Caffeine supplementation also resulted in a 3.4-bpm increase in mean heart rate (95% likely range = 0.1-6.6 bpm) and elevations in pretest (+0.7 mmol·L-1; 95% likely range = 0.1-1.3 mmol·L-1) and posttest (+1.8 mmol·L-1; 95% likely range = 0.3-3.2 mmol·L-1) blood lactate concentrations. In contrast, there was no significant effect of caffeine supplementation on RPE. Conclusion: Although the effect of recovery duration on caffeine-induced responses to multiple sprint work requires further investigation, the results of the present study show that caffeine has ergogenic properties with the potential to benefit performance in both single and multiple sprint sports.
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 09/2008; 40(10):1835-1840. · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Massage is a commonly utilized therapy within sports, frequently intended as an ergogenic aid prior to performance. However, evidence as to the efficacy of massage in this respect is lacking, and massage may in some instances reduce force production. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of massage on subsequent 30-m sprint running performance. Male university level repeat sprint sports players volunteered for the study (n = 37). After each of 3 treatment conditions, subjects completed a standardized warm-up followed by three 30-m sprint trials in a counterbalanced crossover design. Treatment conditions were 15 minutes of lower-limb massage (M), 15 minutes of placebo ultrasound (PU), and rest (R). Thirty-meter sprint times were recorded (including 10-m split times) for the 3 trials under each condition. Best times at 10 m (M: 1.85 +/- 0.09 seconds, PU: 1.84 +/- 0.11 seconds, R: 1.83 +/- 0.10 seconds) and 30 m (M: 4.41 +/- 0.27 seconds, PU: 4.39 +/- 0.28 seconds, R: 4.39 +/- 0.28 seconds) were not significantly different (p > 0.05). There was no significant treatment, trial, or interaction effect for 10- or 30-m sprint times (p > 0.05). No difference was seen in the location of subjects' best times across the 3 trials (p > 0.05). Relative to placebo or control, the results of this study showed that a controlled 15-minute lower-limb massage administered prior to warm-up had no significant effect on subsequent 30-m sprint performance. Massage remains indicated prior to performance where other benefits, such as reduced muscle spasm and psychological stress, might be served to the athlete.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 12/2007; 21(4):1028-31. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to evaluate the time-course of the familiarization process associated with a test of multiple sprint running performance and to determine the reliability of various performance indices once familiarization had been established. Eleven physically active men (mean age: 21 +/- 2 years) completed 4 multiple sprint running trials (12 X 30 m; repeated at 35-s intervals) with 7 days between trials. All testing was conducted indoors, and times were recorded by twin-beam photocells. Results revealed no apparent learning effects as evidenced by no significant (p > 0.05) between-trial differences in measures of fastest or mean 30-m sprint time. Within-subject test-retest reliability determined over 4 trials by coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed excellent reliability for measures of fastest and mean sprint times (CV range: 1.34-2.24%; ICC range: 0.79-0.94). Pre- and posttrial blood lactate concentrations showed good reliability when judged in context with typical values (CV range: 12.08-18.21%; ICC range: 0.72-0.78). In contrast, and in line with previous research, fatigue data showed much greater variability (CV: 26.43%; ICC: 0.66). The results of this study suggest that high degrees of test-retest reliability can be obtained in many multiple sprint running indices without the need for prior familiarization. (C) 2007 National Strength and Conditioning Association
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 07/2007; 21(3). · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of short-term creatine monohydrate supplementation on multiple sprint running performance. Using a double-blind research design, 42 physically active men completed a series of 3 indoor multiple sprint running trials (15 3 30 m repeated at 35-second intervals). After the first 2 trials (familiarization and baseline), subjects were matched for fatigue score before being randomly assigned to 5 days of either creatine (4[middle dot]d-1 x 5 g creatine monohydrate 1 1g maltodextrin) or placebo (4[middle dot]d-1 x 6 g maltodextrin) supplementation. Sprint times were recorded via twin-beam photocells, and earlobe blood samples were drawn to evaluate posttest lactate concentrations. Relative to placebo, creatine supplementation resulted in a 0.7 kg increase in body mass (95% likely range: 0.02 to 1.3 kg) and a 0.4% reduction in body fat (95% likely range: 20.2 to 0.9%). There were no significant (p > 0.05) between-group differences in multiple sprint measures of fastest time, mean time, fatigue, or posttest blood lactate concentration. Despite widespread use as an ergogenic aid in sport, the results of this study suggest that creatine monohydrate supplementation conveys no benefit to multiple sprint running performance. (C) 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 04/2006; 20(2). · 1.80 Impact Factor
  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/2006; 38.
  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/2005; 37.