M Bensignor

Centre Catherine de Sienne, Naoned, Pays de la Loire, France

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Publications (10)14.66 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To analyse the doctor-patient relationship from the patient's point of view and from the doctor's point of view. Experience of a chairman of a chronic pelvic and perineal pain patient association (AFAP-NP) and experience of doctors specialized in chronic pelvic and perineal pain. Management of a patient with chronic pelvic and perineal pain requires knowledge and understanding of the patient's trajectory disease, the history of the disease and the patient's hopes and disappointments, and evaluation of the patient's personality and family, social and work environment. As pain is an emotional experience, the type of doctor-patient relationship determines the quality of subsequent management. A number of basic principles should be applied: believe the patient, avoid making the patient feel responsible for failure, avoid overestimating the secondary benefits, avoid making the patient passive and dependent, learn to reinterpret the patient's symptoms, ask "how" does the pain persist rather than "why", clearly define the patient's demand and adapt management to realistic and accessible objectives.
    Progrès en Urologie 11/2010; 20(12):911-6. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To analyse the doctor–patient relationship from the patient's point of view and from the doctor's point of view. Material and methods Experience of a chairman of a chronic pelvic and perineal pain patient association (AFAP-NP) and experience of doctors specialized in chronic pelvic and perineal pain. Results Management of a patient with chronic pelvic and perineal pain requires knowledge and understanding of the patient's trajectory disease, the history of the disease and the patient's hopes and disappointments, and evaluation of the patient's personality and family, social and work environment. Conclusion As pain is an emotional experience, the type of doctor–patient relationship determines the quality of subsequent management. A number of basic principles should be applied: believe the patient, avoid making the patient feel responsible for failure, avoid overestimating the secondary benefits, avoid making the patient passive and dependent, learn to reinterpret the patient's symptoms, ask “how” does the pain persist rather than “why”, clearly define the patient's demand and adapt management to realistic and accessible objectives.
    Progrès en Urologie 11/2010; · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assess that pudendal neuralgia is a tunnel syndrome due to a ligamentous entrapment of the pudendal nerve and have treated 400 patients surgically since 1987. We have had no major complication. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate our procedure. A sequential, randomized controlled trial to compare decompression of the pudendal nerve with non-surgical treatment. Patients aged 18-70, had chronic, uni/bilateral perineal pain, positive temporary response to blocks at the ischial spine and in Alcock's canal. They were randomly assigned to surgery (n=16) and control (n=16) groups. Primary end point was improvement at 3 months following surgery or assignment to the non-surgery group. Secondary end points were improvement at 12 months and at 4 years following surgical intervention. A significantly higher proportion of the surgery group was improved at 3 months. On intention-to-treat analysis 50% of the surgery group reported improvement in pain at 3 months versus 6.2% of the non-surgery group (p=.0155); in the analysis by treatment protocol the figures were 57.1% versus 6.7% (p=.0052). At 12 months, 71.4% of the surgery group compared with 13.3% of the non-surgery group were improved, analyzing by treatment protocol (p=.0025). Only those randomized to surgery were evaluated at 4 years: 8 remained improved at 4 years. No complications were encountered. In this study we demonstrate that decompression of the pudendal nerve is an effective and safe treatment for cases of chronic pudendal neuralgia that have been unresponsive to analgesia and nerve blocks. Following surgery, other medical interventions may be necessary.
    European Urology 04/2005; 47(3):403-8. · 10.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The investigation of patients suffering from perineal pain when sitting led us to perform an anatomical study of the pudendal nerve. We dissected 50 cadavers and found areas of conflict for the nerve fibers. The nerve trunk can become entrapped at the level of the ischiatic spine, in the Alcock's canal and when it crosses the falciform process. Considering the clinical and neurophysiological data, this type of chronic pain may arise from compression of the nerve between the sacro-tuberal and the sacro-spinal ligaments, and/or in the fascia of the internal obturator muscle. Much like treatment of entrapment of the median nerve in the wrist, we decided to treat chronic perineal pain by nerve blocks, and later by surgery. We describe here the clinical symptoms, the neurophysiological data, and the technique of the nerve blocks. For patients with persistent pain, we propose a posterior surgical approach which has provided successful pain relief in two third of patients.
    Neurochirurgie 12/2004; 50(5):533-9. · 0.32 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The investigation of patients suffering from perineal pain when sitting led us to perform an anatomical study of the pudendal nerve. We dissected 50 cadavers and found areas of conflict for the nerve fibers. The nerve trunk can become entraped at the level of the ischiatic spine, in the Alcock's canal and when it crosses the falciform process. Considering the clinical and neurophysiological data, this type of chronic pain may arise from compression of the nerve between the sacro-tuberal and the sacro-spinal ligaments, and/or in the fascia of the internal obturator muscle. Much like treatment of entrapment of the median nerve in the wrist, we decided to treat chronic perineal pain by nerve blocks, and later by surgery. We describe here the clinical symptoms, the neurophysiological data, and the technique of the nerve blocks. For patients with persistent pain, we propose a posterior surgical approach which has provided successful pain relief in two third of patients.
    Neurochirurgie. 01/2004; 50(5):533-539.
  • Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy 03/1998; 20(2):93-98. · 1.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our anatomic findings have led us to define conflictual relations that may be encountered in their course by the pudendal n. and its branches. Starting from the clinical study of a group of patients suffering from chronic perineal pain in the seated position, we have defined, beginning with the cadaver, three possible conflictual settings: in the constriction between the sacrotuberal and sacrospinal ligaments; in the pudendal canal of Alcock; and during the straddling of the falciform process of the sacro-tuberal ligament by the pudendal n. and its branches. Consequently, considering so-called idiopathic perineal pain as an entrapment syndrome, the clinical and neurophysiologic arguments and infiltration tests have led us to define a surgical strategy which has currently given 70% of good results in 170 operated patients. Earlier diagnosis should improve on this.
    Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy 02/1998; 20(2):93-8. · 1.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 1989, we reported our thoughts on the neurophysiological and anatomic aspects of pudendal nerve involvement in certain types of perinal pain. Since that time, the surgical approach has been modified. Here we report our follow-up of 40 patients with 48 operated nerves. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 7 years and outcome revealed improvement in 67% and no change in 33%. Thus surgery had been useful in two-thirds of the cases; in 44% of the patients, there was either a frank improvement or no change. Early diagnosis appears to be the determining factor in improving results. Operating for the canal syndrome must be performed before lesions to the nervous trunk become too important.
    Chirurgie 01/1993; 119(9):535-9.
  • M Bensignor, J J Labat, R Robert, J M Buzelin
    Cahiers d'anesthésiologie 02/1992; 40(7):537-41.
  • J J Labat, R Robert, M Bensignor, J M Buzelin
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    ABSTRACT: The anatomic study of the pudendal nerve and its relation allows an approach of the mechanisms of compression likely to engender perineal neuralgia. Two conflictual zones are isolated: the first is linked to the clamp which is produced by the insertion of the sacro-epinous ligament on the ischial spine and the sacro-tuberal ligament; the second is linked to the falciform process of the sacrotuberal which threatens the nerve by its sharp upper edge. This conflict is particularly acute in a sitting position. The relation between the trunk of the nerve, its branches and these zones of conflict may explain the clinical observations. The electrophysiological investigations (detection of neurogenic muscles of the perineal floor. Increased sacral latency, pudendal nerve terminal motor latency) confirm the diagnosis. The anesthetic blocks of the pudendal nerve on the ischial spine only have a complimentary diagnostic value. The peridural blocks may also have an interesting therapeutic action (60% of good results 3 months later). In some persistent cases, the nerve has been decompressed firstly by perineal approach, but latterly by transguteal approach.
    Journal d'urologie 02/1990; 96(5):239-44.