Patrick Motte

French National Centre for Scientific Research, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (32)206.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Among the rare colonizers of heavy-metal rich toxic soils, Arabidopsis halleri is a compelling model extremophile, physiologically distinct from its sister species A. lyrata, and A. thaliana. Naturally selected metal hypertolerance and extraordinarily high leaf metal accumulation in A. halleri both require Heavy Metal ATPase4 (HMA4) encoding a PIB-type ATPase that pumps Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) out of specific cell types. Strongly enhanced HMA4 expression results from a combination of gene copy number expansion and cis-regulatory modifications, when compared to A. thaliana. These findings were based on a single accession of A. halleri. Few studies have addressed nucleotide sequence polymorphism at loci known to govern adaptations. We thus sequenced 13 DNA segments across the HMA4 genomic region of multiple A. halleri individuals from diverse habitats. Compared to control loci flanking the three tandem HMA4 gene copies, a gradual depletion of nucleotide sequence diversity and an excess of low-frequency polymorphisms are hallmarks of positive selection in HMA4 promoter regions, culminating at HMA4-3. The accompanying hard selective sweep is segmentally eclipsed as a consequence of recurrent ectopic gene conversion among HMA4 protein-coding sequences, resulting in their concerted evolution. Thus, HMA4 coding sequences exhibit a network-like genealogy and locally enhanced nucleotide sequence diversity within each copy, accompanied by lowered sequence divergence between paralogs in any given individual. Quantitative PCR corroborated that, across A. halleri, three genomic HMA4 copies generate overall 20- to 130-fold higher transcript levels than in A. thaliana. Together, our observations constitute an unexpectedly complex profile of polymorphism resulting from natural selection for increased gene product dosage. We propose that these findings are paradigmatic of a category of multi-copy genes from a broad range of organisms. Our results emphasize that enhanced gene product dosage, in addition to neo- and sub-functionalization, can account for the genomic maintenance of gene duplicates underlying environmental adaptation.
    PLoS Genetics 08/2013; 9(8):e1003707. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are targets for anticancer drug development. To date, only RTK inhibitors that block orthosteric binding of ligands and substrates have been developed. Here, we report the pharmacologic characterization of the chemical SSR128129E (SSR), which inhibits fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling by binding to the extracellular FGFR domain without affecting orthosteric FGF binding. SSR exhibits allosteric properties, including probe dependence, signaling bias, and ceiling effects. Inhibition by SSR is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Oral delivery of SSR inhibits arthritis and tumors that are relatively refractory to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibodies. Thus, orally-active extracellularly acting small-molecule modulators of RTKs with allosteric properties can be developed and may offer opportunities to improve anticancer treatment.
    Cancer cell 04/2013; 23(4):477-488. · 25.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prodigiosin-like pigments or prodiginines (PdGs) are promising drugs owing to their reported antitumor, antibiotic, and immunosuppressive activities. These natural compounds are produced by several bacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Serratia marcescens as most commonly studied models. The bright red color of these tripyrrole pigments made them excellent reporter molecules for studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms that control secondary metabolite production in microorganisms. However, the natural red fluorescence of PdGs has only been rarely used as a biophysical parameter for detection and assessment of PdG biosynthesis. In this work, we used S. coelicolor in order to exemplify how intrinsic red fluorescence could be utilized for rapid, low-cost, sensitive, specific and accurate semi-quantitative analyses of PdG biosynthesis. Additionally, and contrary to the colorimetric-based approach, the fluorescence-based method allows in situ spatio-temporal visualization of PdG synthesis throughout a solid culture of S. coelicolor. As PdG production is related to cell differentiation, their red autofluorescence could be exploited, by means of confocal microscopy, as a natural marker of the entrance into a crucial developmental stage in the course of the S. coelicolor life cycle.
    Journal of microbiological methods 03/2013; · 2.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mitochondria from diverse phyla, including protozoa, fungi, higher plants, and humans, import tRNAs from the cytosol in order to ensure proper mitochondrial translation. Despite the broad occurrence of this process, our understanding of tRNA import mechanisms is fragmentary, and crucial questions about their regulation remain unanswered. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas, a precise correlation was found between the mitochondrial codon usage and the nature and amount of imported tRNAs. This led to the hypothesis that tRNA import might be a dynamic process able to adapt to the mitochondrial genome content. By manipulating the Chlamydomonas mitochondrial genome, we introduced point mutations in order to modify its codon usage. We find that the codon usage modification results in reduced levels of mitochondrial translation as well as in subsequent decreased levels and activities of respiratory complexes. These effects are linked to the consequential limitations of the pool of tRNAs in mitochondria. This indicates that tRNA mitochondrial import cannot be rapidly regulated in response to a novel genetic context and thus does not appear to be a dynamic process. It rather suggests that the steady-state levels of imported tRNAs in mitochondria result from a co-evolutive adaptation between the tRNA import mechanism and the requirements of the mitochondrial translation machinery.
    PLoS Genetics 09/2012; 8(9):e1002946. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Filamentous microorganisms of the bacterial genus Streptomyces have a complex life cycle that includes physiological and morphological differentiations. It is now fairly well accepted that lysis of Streptomyces vegetative mycelium induced by programmed cell death (PCD) provides the required nutritive sources for the bacterium to erect spore-forming aerial hyphae. However, little is known regarding cellular compounds released during PCD and the contribution of these molecules to the feeding of surviving cells in order to allow them to reach the late stages of the developmental program. In this work we assessed the effect of extracellular sugar phosphates (that are likely to be released in the environment upon cell lysis) on the differentiation processes. We demonstrated that the supply of phosphorylated sugars, under inorganic phosphate limitation, delays the occurrence of the second round of PCD, blocks streptomycetes life cycle at the vegetative state and inhibits antibiotic production. The mechanism by which sugar phosphates affect development was shown to involve genes of the Pho regulon that are under the positive control of the two component system PhoR/PhoP. Indeed, the inactivation of the response regulator phoP of Streptomyces lividans prevented the 'sugar phosphate effect' whereas the S. lividans ppk (polyphosphate kinase) deletion mutant, known to overexpress the Pho regulon, presented an enhanced response to phosphorylated sugars.
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 06/2012; 102(3):425-33. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The pituitary is a complex gland comprising different cell types each secreting specific hormones. The extensive network of signaling molecules and transcription factors required for determination and terminal differentiation of specific cell types is still not fully understood. The SRY-like HMG-box (SOX) transcription factor Sox4 plays important roles in many developmental processes and has two homologs in zebrafish, Sox4a and Sox4b. We show that the sox4b gene is expressed in the pituitary anlagen starting at 24 h after fertilization (hpf) and later in the entire head region including the pituitary. At 48 hpf, sox4b mRNA colocalizes with that for TSH (tshβ), glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα), and the Zn finger transcription factor Gata2a. Loss of Sox4b function, using morpholino knockdown or expression of a dominant-negative Sox4 mutant, leads to a drastic decrease in tshβ and gsuα expression and reduced levels of gh, whereas other anterior pituitary gland markers including prl, slβ, pomc, and lim3 are not affected. Sox4b is also required for expression of gata2a in the pituitary. Knockdown of gata2a leads to decreased tshβ and gsuα expression at 48 hpf, similar to sox4b morphants. Injection of gata2a mRNA into sox4b morphants rescued tshβ and gsuα expression in thyrotrope cells. Finally, sox4b or gata2a knockdown causes a significant decrease of gonadotropin expression (lhβ and fshβ) at 4 d after fertilization. In summary, our results indicate that Sox4b is expressed in zebrafish during pituitary development and plays a crucial role in the differentiation of thyrotrope and gonadotrope cells through induction of gata2a expression in the developing pituitary.
    Molecular Endocrinology 04/2012; 26(6):1014-27. · 4.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the isolation and partial biomass characterization of high triacylglycerol (TAG) mutants of Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus obliquus, two algal species considered as potential source of biodiesel. Following UV mutagenesis, 2000 Chlorella and 2800 Scenedesmus colonies were screened with a method based on Nile Red fluorescence. Several mutants with high Nile Red fluorescence were selected by this high-throughput method in both species. Growth and biomass parameters of the strongest mutants were analyzed in detail. All of the four Chlorella mutants showed no significant changes in growth rate, cell weight, cell size, protein and chlorophyll contents on a per cell basis. Whereas all contained elevated total lipid and TAG content per unit of dry weight, two of them were also affected for starch metabolism, suggesting a change in biomass/storage carbohydrate composition. Two Scenedesmus mutants showed a 1.5 and 2-fold increased cell weight and larger cells compared to the wild type, which led to a general increase of biomass including total lipid and TAG content on a per cell basis. Such mutants could subsequently be used as commercial oleaginous algae and serve as an alternative to conventional petrol.
    Journal of Biotechnology 03/2012; 162(1):3-12. · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Defects in complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.5.3)) are the most frequent cause of human respiratory disorders. The pathogenicity of a given human mitochondrial mutation can be difficult to demonstrate because the mitochondrial genome harbors large numbers of polymorphic base changes that have no pathogenic significance. In addition, mitochondrial mutations are usually found in the heteroplasmic state, which may hide the biochemical effect of the mutation. We propose that the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas could be used to study such mutations because (i) respiratory complex-deficient mutants are viable and mitochondrial mutations are found in the homoplasmic state, (ii) transformation of the mitochondrial genome is feasible, and (iii) Chlamydomonas complex I is similar to that of humans. To illustrate this proposal, we introduced a Leu157Pro substitution into the Chlamydomonas ND4 subunit of complex I in two recipient strains by biolistic transformation, demonstrating that site-directed mutagenesis of the Chlamydomonas mitochondrial genome is possible. This substitution did not lead to any respiratory enzyme defects when present in the heteroplasmic state in a patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. When present in the homoplasmic state in the alga, the mutation does not prevent assembly of whole complex I (950 kDa) and the NADH dehydrogenase activity of the peripheral arm of the complex is mildly affected. However, the NADH:duroquinone oxidoreductase activity is strongly reduced, suggesting that the substitution could affect binding of ubiquinone to the membrane domain. The in vitro defects correlate with a decrease in dark respiration and growth rate in vivo.
    The Plant Journal 01/2012; 70(5):759-68. · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cartilaginous elements forming the pharyngeal arches of the zebrafish derive from cranial neural crest cells. Their proper differentiation and patterning are regulated by reciprocal interactions between neural crest cells and surrounding endodermal, ectodermal and mesodermal tissues. In this study, we show that the endodermal factors Runx3 and Sox9b form a regulatory cascade with Egr1 resulting in transcriptional repression of the fsta gene, encoding a BMP antagonist, in pharyngeal endoderm. Using a transgenic line expressing a dominant negative BMP receptor or a specific BMP inhibitor (dorsomorphin), we show that BMP signaling is indeed required around 30 hpf in the neural crest cells to allow cell differentiation and proper pharyngeal cartilage formation. Runx3, Egr1, Sox9b and BMP signaling are required for expression of runx2b, one of the key regulator of cranial cartilage maturation and bone formation. Finally, we show that egr1 depletion leads to increased expression of fsta and inhibition of BMP signaling in the pharyngeal region. In conclusion, we show that the successive induction of the transcription factors Runx3, Egr1 and Sox9b constitutes a regulatory cascade that controls expression of Follistatin A in pharyngeal endoderm, the latter modulating BMP signaling in developing cranial cartilage in zebrafish.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(11):e50140. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eukaryotic precursor mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in precursor mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain and a carboxyl-terminal region enriched in serine/arginine dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for more than 12,000 RRM domains representing more than 200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalog SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants.
    Plant physiology 12/2011; 158(2):546-60. · 6.56 Impact Factor
  • Cécile Nouet, Patrick Motte, Marc Hanikenne
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    ABSTRACT: Transition metal deficiency has a strong impact on the growth and survival of an organism. Indeed, transition metals, such as iron, copper, manganese and zinc, constitute essential cofactors for many key cellular functions. Both photosynthesis and respiration rely on metal cofactor-mediated electron transport chains. Chloroplasts and mitochondria are, therefore, organelles with high metal ion demand and represent essential components of the metal homeostasis network in photosynthetic cells. In this review, we describe the metal requirements of chloroplasts and mitochondria, the acclimation of their functions to metal deficiency and recent advances in our understanding of their contributions to cellular metal homeostasis, the control of the cellular redox status and the synthesis of metal cofactors.
    Trends in Plant Science 04/2011; 16(7):395-404. · 11.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated by RNA interference in the microalga Chlamydomonas. The COX3 mRNA was completely lacking in the cox3-RNAi mutant and no activity and assembly of complex IV were detected. The cox17-RNAi mutant presented a reduced level of COX17 mRNA, a reduced activity of the cytochrome c oxidase but no modification of its amount. The cox3-RNAi mutant had only 40% of the wild-type rate of dark respiration which was cyanide-insensitive. The mutant presented a 60% decrease of H(2)O(2) production in the dark compared to wild type, which probably accounts for a reduced electron leakage by respiratory complexes III and IV. In contrast, the cox17-RNAi mutant showed no modification of respiration and of H(2)O(2) production in the dark but a two to threefold increase of H(2)O(2) in the light compared to wild type and the cox3-RNAi mutant. The cox17-RNAi mutant was more sensitive to cadmium than the wild-type and cox3-RNAi strains. This suggested that besides its role in complex IV assembly, Cox17 could have additional functions in the cell such as metal detoxification or Reactive Oxygen Species protection or signaling. Concerning Cox3, its role in Chlamydomonas complex IV is similar to that of other eukaryotes although this subunit is encoded in the nuclear genome in the alga contrary to the situation found in all other organisms.
    Plant Molecular Biology 10/2010; 74(3):223-33. · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In mice, the Nkx6 genes are crucial to alpha- and beta-cell differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate pancreatic subtype specification remain elusive. Here it is shown that in zebrafish, nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 are co-expressed at early stages in the first pancreatic endocrine progenitors, but that their expression domains gradually segregate into different layers, nkx6.1 being expressed ventrally with respect to the forming islet while nkx6.2 is expressed mainly in beta-cells. Knockdown of nkx6.2 or nkx6.1 expression leads to nearly complete loss of alpha-cells but has no effect on beta-, delta-, or epsilon-cells. In contrast, nkx6.1/nkx6.2 double knockdown leads additionally to a drastic reduction of beta-cells. Synergy between the effects of nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 knockdown on both beta- and alpha-cell differentiation suggests that nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 have the same biological activity, the required total nkx6 threshold being higher for alpha-cell than for beta-cell differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that the nkx6 act on the establishment of the pancreatic endocrine progenitor pool whose size is correlated with the total nkx6 expression level. On the basis of our data, we propose a model in which nkx6.1 and nkx6.2, by allowing the establishment of the endocrine progenitor pool, control alpha- and beta-cell differentiation.
    Developmental Biology 04/2010; 340(2):397-407. · 3.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants.
    Plant physiology 03/2010; 153(1):273-84. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sox7 and Sox18 are members of the F-subgroup of Sox transcription factors family and are mostly expressed in endothelial compartments. In humans, dominant mutations in Sox18 are the underlying cause of the severe hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia disorder characterized by vascular defects. However little is known about which vasculogenic processes Sox7 and Sox18 regulate in vivo. We cloned the orthologs of Sox7 and Sox18 in zebrafish, analysed their expression pattern and performed functional analyses. Both genes are expressed in the lateral plate mesoderm during somitogenesis. At later stages, Sox18 is expressed in all axial vessels whereas Sox7 expression is mainly restricted to the dorsal aorta. Knockdown of Sox7 or Sox18 alone failed to reveal any phenotype. In contrast, blocking the two genes simultaneously led to embryos displaying dysmorphogenesis of the proximal aorta and arteriovenous shunts, all of which can account for the lack of circulation observed in the trunk and tail. Gene expression analyses performed with general endothelial markers on double morphants revealed that Sox7 and Sox18 are dispensable for the initial specification and positioning of the major trunk vessels. However, morphants display ectopic expression of the venous Flt4 marker in the dorsal aorta and a concomitant reduction of the artery-specific markers EphrinB2a and Gridlock. The striking similarities between the phenotype of Sox7/Sox18 morphants and Gridlock mutants strongly suggest that Sox7 and Sox18 control arterial-venous identity by regulating Gridlock expression.
    Developmental Biology 06/2008; 317(2):405-16. · 3.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the types of mutations underlying the evolution of species-specific traits. The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri has the rare ability to colonize heavy-metal-polluted soils, and, as an extremophile sister species of Arabidopsis thaliana, it is a powerful model for research on adaptation. A. halleri naturally accumulates and tolerates leaf concentrations as high as 2.2% zinc and 0.28% cadmium in dry biomass. On the basis of transcriptomics studies, metal hyperaccumulation in A. halleri has been associated with more than 30 candidate genes that are expressed at higher levels in A. halleri than in A. thaliana. Some of these genes have been genetically mapped to broad chromosomal segments of between 4 and 24 cM co-segregating with Zn and Cd hypertolerance. However, the in planta loss-of-function approaches required to demonstrate the contribution of a given candidate gene to metal hyperaccumulation or hypertolerance have not been pursued to date. Using RNA interference to downregulate HMA4 (HEAVY METAL ATPASE 4) expression, we show here that Zn hyperaccumulation and full hypertolerance to Cd and Zn in A. halleri depend on the metal pump HMA4. Contrary to a postulated global trans regulatory factor governing high expression of numerous metal hyperaccumulation genes, we demonstrate that enhanced expression of HMA4 in A. halleri is attributable to a combination of modified cis-regulatory sequences and copy number expansion, in comparison to A. thaliana. Transfer of an A. halleri HMA4 gene to A. thaliana recapitulates Zn partitioning into xylem vessels and the constitutive transcriptional upregulation of Zn deficiency response genes characteristic of Zn hyperaccumulators. Our results demonstrate the importance of cis-regulatory mutations and gene copy number expansion in the evolution of a complex naturally selected extreme trait. The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils and for bio-fortification.
    Nature 06/2008; 453(7193):391-5. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background PAX6 is a transcription factor playing a crucial role in the development of the eye and in the differentiation of the pancreatic endocrine cells as well as of enteroendocrine cells. Studies on the mouse Pax6 gene have shown that sequences upstream from the P0 promoter are required for expression in the lens and the pancreas; but there remain discrepancies regarding the precise location of the pancreatic regulatory elements. Results Due to genome duplication in the evolution of ray-finned fishes, zebrafish has two pax6 genes, pax6a and pax6b . While both zebrafish pax6 genes are expressed in the developing eye and nervous system, only pax6b is expressed in the endocrine cells of the pancreas. To investigate the cause of this differential expression, we used a combination of in silico , in vivo and in vitro approaches. We show that the pax6b P0 promoter targets expression to endocrine pancreatic cells and also to enteroendocrine cells, retinal neurons and the telencephalon of transgenic zebrafish. Deletion analyses indicate that strong pancreatic expression of the pax6b gene relies on the combined action of two conserved regulatory enhancers, called regions A and C. By means of gel shift assays, we detected binding of the homeoproteins PDX1, PBX and PREP to several cis -elements of these regions. In constrast, regions A and C of the zebrafish pax6a gene are not active in the pancreas, this difference being attributable to sequence divergences within two cis -elements binding the pancreatic homeoprotein PDX1. Conclusion Our data indicate a conserved role of enhancers A and C in the pancreatic expression of pax6b and emphasize the importance of the homeoproteins PBX and PREP cooperating with PDX1, in activating pax6b expression in endocrine pancreatic cells. This study also provides a striking example of how adaptative evolution of gene regulatory sequences upon gene duplication progressively leads to subfunctionalization of the paralogous gene pair.
    BMC Developmental Biology 01/2008; · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In amniotes, the pancreatic mesenchyme plays a crucial role in pancreatic epithelium growth, notably through the secretion of fibroblast growth factors. However, the factors involved in the formation of the pancreatic mesenchyme are still largely unknown. In this study, we characterize, in zebrafish embryos, the pancreatic lateral plate mesoderm, which is located adjacent to the ventral pancreatic bud and is essential for its specification and growth. We firstly show that the endoderm, by expressing the fgf24 gene at early stages, triggers the patterning of the pancreatic lateral plate mesoderm. Based on the expression of isl1, fgf10 and meis genes, this tissue is analogous to the murine pancreatic mesenchyme. Secondly, Fgf10 acts redundantly with Fgf24 in the pancreatic lateral plate mesoderm and they are both required to specify the ventral pancreas. Our results unveil sequential signaling between the endoderm and mesoderm that is critical for the specification and growth of the ventral pancreas, and explain why the zebrafish ventral pancreatic bud generates the whole exocrine tissue.
    Development 12/2007; 134(22):4011-21. · 6.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An adequate balance between serine proteases and their plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is critical for pathological angiogenesis. PAI-1 deficiency in mice is associated with impaired choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and tumoral angiogenesis. In the present work, we demonstrate unexpected differences in the contribution of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in these two processes regulated by PAI-1. PAI-1(-/-) mice grafted with BM-derived from wild-type mice were able to support laser-induced CNV formation but not skin carcinoma vascularization. Engraftment of irradiated wild-type mice with PAI-1(-/-) BM prevented CNV formation, demonstrating the crucial role of PAI-1 delivered by BM-derived cells. In contrast, the transient infiltration of tumor transplants by local PAI-1-producing host cells rather than by BM cells was sufficient to rescue tumor growth and angiogenesis in PAI-1-deficient mice. These data identify PAI-1 as a molecular determinant of a local permissive soil for tumor angiogenesis. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that different cellular mechanisms contribute to PAI-1-regulated tumoral and CNV. PAI-1 contributes to BM-dependent choroidal vascularization and to BM-independent tumor growth and angiogenesis.
    American Journal Of Pathology 11/2007; 171(4):1369-80. · 4.60 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

767 Citations
206.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • University of Cologne
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2004–2012
    • University of Liège
      • • Department of Life Sciences
      • • Unité de Biologie et génétique moléculaire
      Liège, WAL, Belgium
  • 2008
    • Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology
      Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany
  • 2006
    • Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany