Michael J Englesbe

Concordia University–Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (140)519.38 Total impact

  • Kyle H Sheetz, Michael J Englesbe
    Annals of surgery. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionBetter measures of liver transplant risk stratification are needed. Our previous work noted a strong relationship between psoas muscle area and survival following liver transplantation. The dorsal muscle group is easier to measure but it is unclear if they are also correlated with surgical outcomes.Methods Our study population included liver transplant recipients with a preoperative CT scan. Cross-sectional areas of the dorsal muscle group at the T12 vertebral level were measured. The primary outcomes for this study were 1 and 5-year mortality and 1-year complications. The relationship between dorsal muscle group area and post-transplantation outcome was assessed using univariate and multivariate techniques.ResultsDorsal muscle group area measurements were strongly associated with psoas area (r = 0.72; p < 0.001). Postoperative outcome was observed from 325 patients. Multivariate logistic regression revealed dorsal muscle group area to be a significant predictor of 1-year mortality (odds ratio [OR] = 0.53, p = 0.001,) and 5-year mortality (OR = 0.53, p < 0.001), and 1-year complications (OR = 0.67, p = 0.007).Conclusion Larger dorsal muscle group muscle size is associated with improved post-transplantation outcomes. The muscle is easier to measure and may represent a clinically relevant postoperative risk factor.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Clinical Transplantation 07/2014; · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Older patients account for nearly half of the United States surgical volume, and age alone is insufficient to predict surgical fitness. Various metrics exist for risk stratification, but little work has been done to describe the association between measures. We aimed to determine whether analytic morphomics, a novel objective risk assessment tool, correlates with functional measures currently recommended in the preoperative evaluation of older patients.
    Journal of Surgical Research 06/2014; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective measures for preoperative risk assessment are needed to inform surgical risk stratification. Previous studies using preoperative imaging have shown that the psoas muscle is a significant predictor of postoperative outcomes. Because psoas measurements are not always available, additional trunk muscles should be identified as alternative measures of risk assessment. Our research assessed the relationship between paraspinous muscle area, psoas muscle area, and surgical outcomes.
    Journal of Surgical Research 05/2014; · 2.02 Impact Factor
  • JAMA surgery. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Ostomy surgery is common and has traditionally been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, suggesting an important target for quality improvement. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the variation in outcomes after ostomy creation surgery within Michigan to identify targets for quality improvement. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study took place within the 34-hospital Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. Patients included were those undergoing ostomy creation surgery between 2006 and 2011. We evaluated hospital morbidity and mortality rates after risk adjustment (age, comorbidities, emergency vs elective, and procedure type). A total of 4250 patients underwent ostomy creation surgery; 3866 procedures (91.0%) were open and 384 (9.0%) were laparoscopic. Unadjusted morbidity and mortality rates were 43.9% and 10.7%. Unadjusted morbidity rates for specific procedures ranged from 32.7% for ostomy-creation-only procedures to 47.8% for Hartmann procedures. Risk-adjusted morbidity rates varied significantly between hospitals, ranging from 31.2% (95% CI, 18.4-43.9) to 60.8% (95% CI, 48.9-72.6). There were 5 statistically significant high-outlier hospitals and 3 statistically significant low-outlier hospitals for risk-adjusted morbidity. The pattern of complication types was similar between high- and low-outlier hospitals. Case volume, operative duration, and use of laparoscopic surgery did not explain the variation in morbidity rates across hospitals. This work was limited by its retrospective study design, by unmeasured variation in case severity, and by our inability to differentiate between colostomies and ileostomies because of the use of Current Procedural Terminology codes. Morbidity and mortality rates for modern ostomy surgery are high. Although this type of surgery has received little attention in healthcare policy, these data reveal that it is both common and uncommonly morbid. Variation in hospital performance provides an opportunity to identify quality improvement practices that could be disseminated among hospitals.
    Diseases of the Colon & Rectum 05/2014; 57(5):632-7. · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgeons often face difficult decisions in selecting which patients can tolerate major surgical procedures. Although recent studies suggest the potential for trunk muscle size, as measured on preoperative imaging, to inform surgical risk, these measures are static and do not account for the effect of the surgery itself. We hypothesize that trunk muscle size will show dynamic changes over the perioperative period, and this change correlates with postoperative mortality risk. A total of 425 patients who underwent inpatient general surgery were identified to have both a 90-d preoperative and a 90-d postoperative abdominal computed tomography scan. The change in trunk muscle size was calculated using analytic morphomic techniques. The primary outcome was 1-y survival. Covariate-adjusted outcomes were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 82.6% patients (n = 351) experienced a decrease in trunk muscle size in the time between their scans (average 62.1 d). When stratifying patients into tertiles of rate of change in trunk muscle size and adjusting for other covariates, patients in the tertile of the greatest rate loss had significantly increased risk of 1-y mortality than those in the tertile of the least rate loss (P = 0.002; odds ratio = 3.40 95% confidence interval, 1.55-7.47). The adjusted mortality rate for the tertile of the greatest rate loss was 24.0% compared with 13.3% for the tertile of the least decrease. Trunk muscle size changes rapidly in the perioperative period and correlates with mortality. Trunk muscle size may be a critical target for interventional programs focusing on perioperative optimization of the surgical patient.
    Journal of Surgical Research 03/2014; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the relationship between postoperative morbidity and mortality and patients' perspectives of care. Priorities in health care quality research are shifting to place greater emphasis on patient-centered outcomes. Whether patients' perspectives of care correlate with surgical outcomes remains unclear. Retrospective cohort study. Using data from the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative clinical registry (2008-2012), we identified 41,833 patients undergoing major elective general or vascular surgery. Our exposure variables were the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Total and Base Scores derived from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Patient Experience of Care Domain. Using multilevel, mixed-effects logistic regression models, we adjusted hospitals' rates of morbidity and mortality for patient comorbidities and case mix. We stratified reporting of outcomes by quintiles of hospitals' Total and Base Scores. Risk-adjusted morbidity (13.6%-28.6%) varied widely across hospitals. There were no significant differences in risk-adjusted morbidity rates between hospitals with the lowest and highest HCAHPS Total Scores (24.5% vs 20.2%, P = 0.312). The HCAHPS Base Score, which quantifies sustained achievement or improvement in patients' perspectives of care, was not associated with a reduction in postoperative morbidity over the study period despite an overall decrease of 2.5% for all centers. We observed a similar relationship between HCAHPS Total and Base Scores and postoperative mortality. Patients' perspectives of care do not correlate with the incidence of morbidity and mortality after major surgery. Improving patients' perspectives and objective outcomes may require separate initiatives for surgeons in Michigan.
    Annals of surgery 03/2014; · 7.90 Impact Factor
  • M J Englesbe, A K Mathur, S A Waits, J C Magee
    Liver Transplantation 03/2014; · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Living kidney donor pools are expanding with the use of "medically complex" donors. Whether or not to include cigarette smokers as living kidney donors remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between donor smoking and recipient outcomes. We hypothesized that donor smoking would increase donor complications and decrease allograft and recipient survival over time. The charts of 602 living kidney donors and their recipients were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox modeling were used to assess the relationships between smoking and recipient and allograft survival. No difference in postoperative complications was seen in smoking versus non-smoking donors. Donor smoking at time of evaluation did not significantly decrease allograft survival (HR = 1.19, p = 0.52), but recipient smoking at evaluation did reduce allograft survival (HR = 1.74, p = 0.05). Both donor and recipient smoking decreased recipient survival (HR = 1.93, p < 0.01 vs HR = 1.74, p = 0.048). When controlled for donor and recipient factors, cigarette smoking by living kidney donors significantly reduced recipient survival. This datum suggests that careful attention to smoking history is an important clinical measure in which to counsel potential donors and recipients. Policy efforts to limit donors with a recent smoking history should be balanced with the overall shortage of appropriate kidney donors.
    Clinical Transplantation 03/2014; · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The practice of ambulatory surgery has expanded greatly as a result of advances in surgical technology and rising financial pressures. We sought to characterize the utilization of ambulatory surgical practices for common general surgical procedures in Michigan. We identified 33,655 patients within the Michigan Surgery Quality Collaborative clinical registry undergoing general surgical procedures performed on an ambulatory basis between 25% and 75% of the time. Our primary outcome was the incidence of ambulatory surgery. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models, we adjusted ambulatory surgery utilization rates for patient comorbidities, procedure composition, and hospital characteristics. We then assessed the incidence of postoperative complications across hospitals grouped by their ambulatory surgery utilization rates. Adjusted utilization rates of ambulatory surgery varied widely across 34 hospitals from 29%-75% (mean = 54%). Risk-adjusted complication rates for ambulatory cases were similar between hospitals performing the least (2.2%) and the most ambulatory surgery (2.3%, P = 0.365). Patient factors and hospital characteristics accounted for 23.3% of the between-hospital variability in ambulatory surgery utilization, whereas most variation was explained by effects at the surgeon level. Despite wide variation in ambulatory surgery utilization for general surgical procedures, we were unable to explain observed differences by patient comorbidities, case mix, or hospital characteristics. These data suggest that understanding factors associated with ambulatory surgery utilization may represent a novel avenue for quality improvement within our statewide surgical collaborative.
    Journal of Surgical Research 02/2014; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Morphometric assessment has emerged as a strong predictor of postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, a gap exists in translating this knowledge to bedside decision making. We introduced a novel measure of patient-centered surgical risk assessment: morphometric age. OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between morphometric age and posttransplant survival. DATA SOURCES Medical records of recipients of deceased-donor liver transplants (study population) and kidney donors/trauma patients (morphometric age control population). STUDY SELECTION A retrospective cohort study of 348 liver transplant patients and 3313 control patients. We assessed medical records for validated morphometric characteristics of aging (psoas area, psoas density, and abdominal aortic calcification). We created a model (stratified by sex) for a morphometric age equation, which we then calculated for the control population using multivariate linear regression modeling (covariates). These models were then applied to the study population to determine each patient's morphometric age. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS All analytic steps related to measuring morphometric characteristics were obtained via custom algorithms programmed into commercially available software. An independent observer confirmed all algorithm outputs. Trained assistants performed medical record review to obtain patient characteristics. RESULTS Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that morphometric age was a significant independent predictor of overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.03 per morphometric year [95% CI, 1.02-1.04; P < .001]) after liver transplant. Chronologic age was not a significant covariate for survival (hazard ratio, 1.02 per year [95% CI, 0.99-1.04; P = .21]). Morphometric age stratified patients at high and low risk for mortality. For example, patients in the middle chronologic age tertile who jumped to the oldest morphometric tertile have worse outcomes than those who jumped to the youngest morphometric tertile (74.4% vs 93.2% survival at 1 year [P = .03]; 45.2% vs 75.0% at 5 years [P = .03]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Morphometric age correlated with mortality after liver transplant with better discrimination than chronologic age. Assigning a morphometric age to potential liver transplant recipients could improve prediction of postoperative mortality risk.
    JAMA surgery. 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether failure to rescue, as a driver of mortality, can be used to identify which hospitals attenuate the specific risks inherent to elderly adults undergoing surgery. Retrospective cohort study. State-wide surgical collaborative in Michigan. Older adults undergoing major general or vascular surgery between 2006 and 2011 (N = 24,216). Thirty-four hospitals were ranked according to risk-adjusted 30-day mortality and grouped into tertiles. Within each tertile, rates of major complications and failure to rescue were calculated, stratifying outcomes according to age (<75 vs ≥75). Next, differences in failure-to-rescue rates between age groups within each hospital were calculated. Failure-to-rescue rates were more than two times as high in elderly adults as in younger individuals in each tertile of hospital mortality (26.0% vs 10.3% at high-mortality hospitals, P < .001). Within hospitals, the average difference in failure-to-rescue rates was 12.5%. Nine centers performed better than expected, and three performed worse than expected, with the largest differences exceeding 25%. Although elderly adults experience higher failure-to-rescue rates, this does not account for hospitals' overall capacity to rescue individuals from complications. Comparing rates of younger and elderly adults within hospitals may identify centers where efforts toward complication rescue favor, or are customized for, elderly adults. These centers should be studied as part of the collaborative's effort to address the disparate outcomes that elderly adults in Michigan experience.
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 01/2014; · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competency in Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, educational curricula need to address training in quality improvement (QI). We sought to establish a program to train residents in the principles of QI and to provide practical experiences in developing and implementing improvement projects. Design We present a novel approach for engaging students, residents, and faculty in QI efforts—Team Action Projects in Surgery (TAPS). Setting Large academic medical center and health system. Participants Multiple teams consisting of undergraduate students, medical students, surgery residents, and surgery faculty were assembled and QI projects developed. Using “managing to learn” Lean principles, these multilevel groups approached each project with robust data collection, development of an A3, and implementation of QI activities. Results A total of 5 resident led QI projects were developed during the TAPS pilot phase. These included a living kidney donor enhanced recovery protocol, consult improvement process, venous thromboembolism prophylaxis optimization, Clostridium difficile treatment standardization, and understanding variation in operative duration of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Qualitative and quantitative assessment showed significant value for both the learner and stakeholders of QI related projects. Conclusion Through the development of TAPS, we demonstrate a novel approach to addressing the increasing focus on QI within graduate medical education. Efforts to expand this multilevel team based approach would have value for teachers and learners alike.
    Journal of Surgical Education 01/2014; 71(2):166–168. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Perioperative mortality in the elderly is high following emergency surgery and varies significantly between hospitals an observation partially explained by differences in failure to rescue. We hypothesize that failure to rescue following certain types of complications underlies the disproportionately poor outcomes observed in elderly patients. Methods We identified 23,217 patients undergoing emergent general or vascular surgery procedures at 41 hospitals within the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative between 2007 and 2012. Patients’ first complications were identified and categorized by type. We compared failure to rescue rates at the patient-level between patients <75 and ≥75 years of age. We then compared failure to rescue rates after specific complications across hospitals grouped in tertiles by risk-adjusted 30-day mortality. Results Risk-adjusted failure to rescue rates were significantly higher in the elderly after a first infectious (21.7% vs. 10.3%; p<0.01) or pulmonary (38.2% vs. 20.4%; p<0.01) complication when compared to younger patients. At the hospital level, high morality centers failed to rescue elderly patients more frequently than low mortality centers after a first infectious (35.6% v. 22.2%; p<0.01) and pulmonary (24.3 v. 14.3; p<0.01) complication. Failure to rescue rates following cardiovascular complications did not differ significantly across patient ages or tertiles of hospital mortality. Conclusion Hospitals fail to rescue elderly patients at higher rates than younger patients after infectious and pulmonary complications. Efforts to recognize and manage these specific complications have the potential to improve emergency surgical care of the elderly in Michigan.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 01/2014; · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence and natural history of aneurysms among abdominal transplant recipients. Methods This article is a retrospective review of adult patients who underwent a kidney or liver transplant at a single center between February 23, 2000, and October 6, 2011. Data were obtained by searching electronic medical records for documentation of arterial aneurysm. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were included if they were ≥3.0 cm in diameter, and thoracic aortic aneurysms were included if they had a diameter ≥3.75 cm. Additional data collected included recipient demographics, transplant-specific data, and characteristics of the aneurysms. Results There were 927 liver transplant recipients, 2133 kidney transplant recipients, 23 liver-kidney transplant recipients, and 133 kidney-pancreas transplant recipients included in our study; 127 of these patients were identified to have aneurysms (40 liver, 83 kidney, 3 liver-kidney, 1 kidney-pancreas). The overall prevalence of any aneurysm was similar for liver and kidney recipients, but the distribution of aneurysm types was different for the two groups. AAAs made up 29.6% of aneurysms in kidney transplant recipients and 11.4% of aneurysms in liver transplant recipients (P = .02). Visceral aneurysms were 10-fold as common in liver transplant recipients compared with kidney transplant recipients (47.7% of aneurysms vs 5.1% of aneurysms; P < .01). The majority of visceral artery aneurysms involved the hepatic and splenic artery. For both liver and kidney transplant recipients, most aneurysms occurred post-transplantation. All known aortic aneurysm ruptures occurred post-transplantation (25% of AAAs in liver transplant patients and 22.2% of thoracic aortic aneurysms in kidney transplant patients). There was a trend toward higher AAA expansion rates after transplantation (0.58 ± 0.48 cm/y compared with 0.41 ± 0.16 cm/y). Conclusions Compared with the general population, aneurysms may be more common and may have an aggressive natural history in abdominal transplant recipients. Furthermore, the types of aneurysms that affect liver and kidney transplant recipients differ. Care teams should be aware of these risks and surveillance programs should be tailored appropriately.
    Journal of Vascular Surgery. 01/2014; 59(3):594–598.
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, failure to rescue (FTR; death following major complication) has been shown to be a primary driver of mortality in highly morbid operations. Establishing this relationship for open and endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be a critical first step in improving mortality following these procedures. We sought to examine the relative contribution of severe complications and FTR to variations in mortality rate. We examined endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and open aortic repair (OAR; n = 3215) performed in 40 hospitals participating in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from 2007 to 2012. Hospitals were first divided into risk-adjusted mortality tertiles. We then determined rates of severe complications and FTR within each tertile. For EVAR, risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates varied significantly between the lowest and highest tertiles (0.07% vs 6.14%; P < .01). However, while major complication rates were almost identical (9.0 vs 9.8; P = NS), FTR rates were about 35 times greater in high-mortality hospitals (4.0% vs 33.3%). Similar associations with mortality, severe complications, and FTR were seen for OAR as well. The most common complications that led to FTR events were postoperative transfusion (OAR 29.8% vs EVAR 5.8%) and prolonged ventilation (OAR 18.2% vs EVAR 1.0%). The average number of severe complications per FTR event was 2.85 and 2.66 for OAR and EVAR, respectively. FTR appears to drive a large proportion of the variation in mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The exact mechanisms underlying this variation remain unknown. Nonetheless, FTR is influenced by the structural characteristics and safety culture related to the timely recognition and management of severe complications. Hospitals that are unable to effectively handle severe complications following EVAR or OAR require close scrutiny.
    Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter 12/2013; · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the procedure of choice for treatment of cholelithiasis/cholecystitis. Conversion rates (CR) to open cholecystectomy (OC) have been reported previously as 5-15% in elective cases, and up to 25% in patients with acute cholecystitis. We examined the CR in a tertiary-care academic hospital and a statewide surgery quality collaborative, and to compare complications and outcomes in elective and emergency cholecystectomy. Methods: Prospective data were obtained from: 1) Non-Trauma Emergency Surgery (NTE) database of all emergent cholecystectomies 1/1/2008-12/31/2009; and 2) Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (MSQC) database with a random sample of 20-30% of all operations performed 1/1/2005-12/31/2010, including both University of Michigan (UM) data and statewide data from 34 participating hospitals. Patient characteristics, CR, and outcomes were compared for emergent vs. elective cases. Results: Non-trauma ES patients had a mean hospital length of stay (HLOS) of 4.9 d. Open cholecystectomy-HLOS was greater (4.0, LC; 7.9 laparoscopic converted to open cholecystectomy; 8.7, OC, p<0.0001); mortality was 0.35% and CR was 17.5%. In the UM-MSQC dataset, OC-HLOS was greater (6.8 OC vs. 4.6 LC, p<0.001); mortality was 0.65%; CR was 9.1% in elective cases and 14.9% in emergent cases. CR was almost two-fold higher [17.5% of all NTE cholecystectomies vs. 9.1% of UM-MSQC elective cholecystectomies (p=0.00078)]. The statewide MSQC cholecystectomy data showed significantly increased HLOS in emergent cholecystectomy patients (4.34 vs. 2.65 d; p<0.0001). Morbidity (8.8 vs. 3.7%) and mortality (2.6 vs. 0.5%) rates were also significantly higher in emergent vs. elective cholecystectomies (p<0.0001). Conclusion: In NTE patients requiring cholecystectomy, CR is almost two-fold higher but is lower than in reports published previously (25%). However, there is a wide variability in mortality and morbidity for emergency cholecystectomy in both unadjusted and risk-adjusted analyses. Further studies are required to determine modifiable risk factors to improve outcomes in emergency cholecystectomy.
    Surgical Infections 11/2013; · 1.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence and natural history of aneurysms among abdominal transplant recipients. This article is a retrospective review of adult patients who underwent a kidney or liver transplant at a single center between February 23, 2000, and October 6, 2011. Data were obtained by searching electronic medical records for documentation of arterial aneurysm. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were included if they were ≥3.0 cm in diameter, and thoracic aortic aneurysms were included if they had a diameter ≥3.75 cm. Additional data collected included recipient demographics, transplant-specific data, and characteristics of the aneurysms. There were 927 liver transplant recipients, 2133 kidney transplant recipients, 23 liver-kidney transplant recipients, and 133 kidney-pancreas transplant recipients included in our study; 127 of these patients were identified to have aneurysms (40 liver, 83 kidney, 3 liver-kidney, 1 kidney-pancreas). The overall prevalence of any aneurysm was similar for liver and kidney recipients, but the distribution of aneurysm types was different for the two groups. AAAs made up 29.6% of aneurysms in kidney transplant recipients and 11.4% of aneurysms in liver transplant recipients (P = .02). Visceral aneurysms were 10-fold as common in liver transplant recipients compared with kidney transplant recipients (47.7% of aneurysms vs 5.1% of aneurysms; P < .01). The majority of visceral artery aneurysms involved the hepatic and splenic artery. For both liver and kidney transplant recipients, most aneurysms occurred post-transplantation. All known aortic aneurysm ruptures occurred post-transplantation (25% of AAAs in liver transplant patients and 22.2% of thoracic aortic aneurysms in kidney transplant patients). There was a trend toward higher AAA expansion rates after transplantation (0.58 ± 0.48 cm/y compared with 0.41 ± 0.16 cm/y). Compared with the general population, aneurysms may be more common and may have an aggressive natural history in abdominal transplant recipients. Furthermore, the types of aneurysms that affect liver and kidney transplant recipients differ. Care teams should be aware of these risks and surveillance programs should be tailored appropriately.
    Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter 11/2013; · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although sarcopenia (muscle loss) is associated with increased mortality after liver transplantation, its influence on other complications is less well understood. We examined the association between sarcopenia and the risk of severe posttransplant infections among adult liver transplant recipients. By calculating the total psoas area (TPA) on preoperative computed tomography scans, we assessed sarcopenia among 207 liver transplant recipients. The presence or absence of a severe posttransplant infection was determined by a review of the medical chart. The influence of posttransplant infections on overall survival was also assessed. We identified 196 episodes of severe infections among 111 patients. Fifty-six patients had more than 1 infection. The median time to the development of an infection was 27 days (interquartile range = 13-62 days). When the patients were grouped by TPA tertiles, patients in the lowest tertile had a greater than 4-fold higher chance of developing a severe infection in comparison with patients in the highest tertile (odds ratio = 4.6, 95% confidence interval = 2.25-9.53). In a multivariate analysis, recipient age (hazard ratio = 1.04, P = 0.02), pretransplant TPA (hazard ratio = 0.38, P < 0.01), and pretransplant total bilirubin level (hazard ratio = 1.05, P = 0.02) were independently associated with the risk of developing severe infections. Patients with severe posttransplant infections had worse 1-year survival than patients without infections (76% versus 92%, P = 0.003). In conclusion, among patients undergoing liver transplantation, a lower TPA was associated with a heightened risk for posttransplant infectious complications and mortality. Future efforts should focus on approaches for assessing and mitigating vulnerability in patients undergoing transplantation. Liver Transpl 000:000-000, 2013. © 2013 AASLD.
    Liver Transplantation 09/2013; · 3.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
519.38 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2004–2014
    • University of Michigan
      • Department of Surgery
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2010
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Surgery
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2003–2004
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Surgery
      Seattle, WA, United States