Eyal Sheiner

Soroka Medical Center, Be'er Sheva`, Southern District, Israel

Are you Eyal Sheiner?

Claim your profile

Publications (507)1164.32 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aims to examine whether renal function during pregnancy can serve as a surrogate marker for the risk of developing atherosclerotic-related morbidity. a case-control study, including women who gave birth at a tertiary referral medical center during 2000-2012. This population was divided into cases of women who were subsequently hospitalized for atherosclerotic morbidity during the study period and age-matched controls. From the study population, we retrieved two groups: the creatinine (Cr) group: women who had at least one Cr measurement (4945 women) and the urea group: women who had at least one urea measurement (4932 women) during their pregnancies. In the Cr and urea group, there were 572 and 571 cases and 4373 and 4361 controls respectively. The mean follow-up period in the Cr and urea group was 61.7±37.0 and 57.3±36.0 months respectively. Cox proportional hazards models (controlling for confounders: gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, obesity, maternal age, creatinine level (for urea), and gestational week) were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for hospitalizations. A significant association was documented between renal function during pregnancy and long-term atherosclerotic morbidity. Multivariate analysis, showed that Cr at pregnancy index of ≥89 μmol/l was associated with a significant increased risk for hospitalization due to cardiovascular (CVS) events (adjusted HR=2.91 CI 1.37-6.19 P=0.005) and urea level ≤7mmol/l was independently associated with reduced prevalence of CVS hospitalization (adjusted HR=0.62 CI 0.57-0.86 P=0.001). Renal function abnormality during pregnancy may reveal occult predisposition to atherosclerotic morbidity years after childbirth. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Nephrology 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/nep.12575 · 1.86 Impact Factor
  • Yael Baumfeld · Gil Gutvirtz · Iris Shoham · Eyal Sheiner
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns in pregnancies complicated with vasa previa and velamentous cord insertion (VCI). A retrospective study comparing FHR patterns in pregnancies and subsequent pregnancies with/without VCI and in pregnancies with/without vasa previa was conducted. For each patient, FHR patterns were compared to the subsequent pregnancy. Deliveries occurred between the years 1988 and 2012 in a tertiary medical center. FHR patterns were evaluated according to the ACOG guidelines. During the study period, there were 184 pregnancies with VCI and 37 pregnancies with vasa previa, undetected during pregnancy. FHR patterns of the VCI group included more cases of abnormal baseline (7 vs. 2 %, p < 0.05), out of which 7 % were fetal tachycardia (vs. 2 %) and 4 % were bradycardia (vs. 1 %). There were also more cases of abnormal baseline and abnormal variability (7 vs. 2 % and 32 vs. 22 %, respectively, p < 0.05) in the VCI group. FHR categories also differed between the velamentous cord insertion pregnancies and subsequent ones. VCI pregnancies had more category 2 patterns, not statistically significant (64 vs. 55 %, p = 0.11). FHR patterns of the vasa previa group included more cases of abnormal baseline (27 vs. 7 %, p < 0.05), out of which 18 % were tachycardia and 9 % were bradycardia. Decelerations were recorded in a total of 61 % of the vasa previa cases (61 vs. 31 %, p = 0.02), most of which were variable decelerations (48 vs. 17 %). Vasa previa pregnancies had more category 2 patterns (64 vs. 52 %). Fetal heart rate patterns in pregnancies complicated with VCI or vasa previa have several non-specific pathological characteristics; none can be used for early detection of these conditions.
    Archives of Gynecology 07/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00404-015-3819-6 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Capsule: We observed that first trimester pregnancy loss is associated with an altered expression profile of the three isoforms of the NK receptor NKp30 expressed by NKs in PBMC and placental tissue. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether first trimester pregnancy loss is associated with differences in expression of NKp30 splice variants (isoforms) in maternal peripheral blood or placental tissue. We conducted a prospective case–control study; a total of 33 women undergoing dilation and curettage due to first trimester pregnancy loss were further subdivided into groups with sporadic or recurrent pregnancy loss. The control group comprises women undergoing elective termination of pregnancy. The qPCR approach was employed to assess the relative expression of NKp30 isoforms as well as the total expression of NKp30 and NKp46 receptors between the selected groups. Results show that in both PBMC and placen-tal tissue, NKp46 and NKp30 expressions were mildly elevated in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. In particular, NKp46 elevation was significant. Moreover, expression analysis of NKp30 isoforms manifested a different profile between PBMC and the placenta. NKp30-a and NKp30-b isoforms in the placental tissue, but not in PBMC, showed a significant increase in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. Placental expression of NKp30 activating isoforms-a and-b in the pregnancy loss groups was negatively correlated with PLGF expression. By contrast, placental expression of these isoforms in the elective group was positively correlated with TNFα, IL-10, and VEGF-A expression. The altered expression of NKp30 activating isoforms in placental tissue from patients with pregnancy loss compared to the elective group and the different correlations with cytokine expression point to the involvement of NKp30-mediated function in pregnancy loss.
    Frontiers in Immunology 07/2015; 6. DOI:10.3389/fimmu.2015.00189
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Placental growth factor (PlGF) has been suggested as a possible biomarker for major placenta-related disorders such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. However, experimental findings suggest that PlGF concentrations may be influenced by other factors besides the placenta. In the present study, we examined how acute fetal injury affects PlGF concentrations in maternal circulation. We therefore monitored PlGF concentrations in maternal circulation before and after feticide. A prospective comparative study was performed. Blood samples were drawn prospectively between January and July 2012, before and after feticide at predetermined time points in relation to the procedure (0, 30, 60, and 120 min). The levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the maternal circulation were measured to detect acute tissue damage. PlGF concentrations were measured by standard human ELISA. Following feticide (60 and 120 min), PlGF concentrations decreased significantly compared to the concentrations before feticide. LDH concentrations did not change before and after feticide. Our finding, along with the detailed review of the literature described in our work, supports a new concept in which primary fetal distress can affect PlGF concentration in maternal circulation. A large-scale study is required to strengthen our finding.
    Archives of Gynecology 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00404-015-3729-7 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine whether women with a previous uterine rupture have a higher risk of adverse perinatal outcome in subsequent births. A retrospective study comparing all subsequent singleton cesarean deliveries (CD) of women with a previous uterine rupture, with CD of women with no such history, during the years 1988-2011 was conducted. Out of 34,601 singleton CD that occurred during the study period, 0.1 % (n = 46) were of women with a previous uterine rupture. Previous uterine rupture was significantly associated with preterm delivery (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2500 g), cervical tears, and dehiscence of the uterine scar. Pregnancies following a previous uterine rupture were associated with lower Apgar scores at 5 min. However, the perinatal mortality rate did not differ between the two groups. A recurrent uterine rupture occurred in 15.2 % of patients with a previous uterine rupture. Previous uterine rupture is a risk factor for adverse maternal and perinatal outcome and specifically recurrent uterine rupture. Appropriate consultation regarding these risks is needed for patients with a previous uterine rupture.
    Archives of Gynecology 04/2015; 292(4). DOI:10.1007/s00404-015-3715-0 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: The present study was aimed to determine whether high potassium level during pregnancy is an independent risk factor for future atherosclerotic morbidity. Patients and methods: A case–control study was conducted including women who delivered between the years 2000–2012 and subsequently developed atherosclerotic morbidity after their last delivery (n = 653) and matched controls (n = 4101). The mean follow-up duration was 57.7 ± 36.5 and 78.5 ± 42.3 months, respectively. The cases were further divided into: major events (severe atherosclerotic morbidity; n = 363), minor events (i.e. cardiovascular risk factors; n = 201) and cardiovascular evaluation tests (n = 89). The Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for hospitalizations while controlling for confounders. Results: A Cox proportional hazard model, controlling for confounders such as gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, obesity, maternal age, creatinine level and gestational week at index pregnancy showed that K+ ≥ 5.0 mEq/L during pregnancy was significantly associated with hospitalizations due to severe atherosclerotic morbidity (adjusted HR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.02–2.35; p = 0.039). A non-significant trend was also noted with long-term total hospitalizations for atherosclerotic (adjusted HR = 1.39; 95% CI 0.99–1.94; p = 0.052). Conclusion: High potassium level during pregnancy is associated with a significant risk for severe atherosclerotic morbidity, as it might be an indication for occult metabolic and renal dysfunction.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed to determine whether high potassium level during pregnancy is an independent risk factor for future atherosclerotic morbidity. A case-control study was conducted including women who delivered between the years 2000-2012 and subsequently developed atherosclerotic morbidity after their last delivery (n = 653) and matched controls (n = 4101). The mean follow-up duration was 57.7 ± 36.5 and 78.5 ± 42.3 months, respectively. The cases were further divided into: major events (severe atherosclerotic morbidity; n = 363), minor events (i.e. cardiovascular risk factors; n = 201) and cardiovascular evaluation tests (n = 89). The Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for hospitalizations while controlling for confounders. A Cox proportional hazard model, controlling for confounders such as gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, obesity, maternal age, creatinine level and gestational week at index pregnancy showed that K(+ )≥ 5.0 mEq/L during pregnancy was significantly associated with hospitalizations due to severe atherosclerotic morbidity (adjusted HR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.02-2.35; p = 0.039). A non-significant trend was also noted with long-term total hospitalizations for atherosclerotic (adjusted HR = 1.39; 95% CI 0.99-1.94; p = 0.052). High potassium level during pregnancy is associated with a significant risk for severe atherosclerotic morbidity, as it might be an indication for occult metabolic and renal dysfunction.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 04/2015; DOI:10.3109/14767058.2015.1032238 · 1.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of non-obstetric invasive procedure during pregnancy on perinatal outcome. The present retrospective study investigated perinatal outcome in women that underwent an invasive procedure during one of their pregnancies (n = 61); perinatal outcome was compared to other pregnancies (without an invasive procedure) of the same patients (n = 122). Women with a non-obstetric invasive procedure during pregnancy delivered earlier than those in the comparison group (38.5 vs. 40.0 weeks; p = 0.01) and had a significantly higher rate of cesarean sections (18 vs. 5 cases; p < 0.01). In addition, birth weight was significantly lower in patients undergoing invasive procedures during pregnancy (2908.65 vs. 3185.84 gr; p = 0.02). The absolute rate of prematurity (<37 weeks) was non-significantly higher in the study group (18.3 vs. 10.0 %; p = 0.28). Non-obstetric invasive procedures are associated with an increased rate of cesarean sections and lower birth weight. Nevertheless, no significant differences in early perinatal outcome were found in comparison to other pregnancies of the same patients. More studies are needed to evaluate the outcome following specific procedures.
    Archives of Gynecology 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00404-015-3689-y · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine whether a pre-gestational diagnosis of depression is a risk factor for adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome. A retrospective cohort study investigating maternal characteristics, obstetrical and perinatal outcomes in singleton pregnancies of women with and without a diagnosis of depression was conducted. A pre-gestational diagnosis of depression was made by a psychiatrist or family physician and was recorded in the patients' chart. Multiple logistic regression models were used to control for possible confounders. During the study period, 256312 deliveries occurred. Out of which, 221 women (0.1%) had a pre-gestational diagnosis of depression. When examining obstetric outcomes, women with a diagnosis of depression were older (32.05±5.772 VS 28.56±5.851) and smokers (7.2% VS 1.1%), had a higher rate of preterm deliveries (37.99±2.989 VS 39.02±2.249) and cesarean sections (28.5% VS 13.6%) in comparison to the control group. When examining neonatal outcomes, neonates of women diagnosed with depression had a lower birth mean weight (3.038.47±649.6 VS 3183.44±551.8) and increased rates of perinatal mortality (3.2% VS 1.3%). Using a multiple logistic regression model, with perinatal mortality as the outcome variable to control for cofounders such as maternal age, preterm birth, chronic hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus, a diagnosis of depression was not found to be an independent risk factor for perinatal mortality. Another multiple logistic regression model found advanced maternal age, smoking, preterm birth and labor induction to be associated with a diagnosis of depression. Pregnant women diagnosed with depression are at an increased risk for preterm birth, low birth weight, and cesarean sections. However, it was not associated with increased rates of perinatal mortality.
    Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine 03/2015; DOI:10.3109/14767058.2015.1023708 · 1.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether vanishing twin syndrome (VTS) is associated with adverse perinatal outcome. A retrospective cohort study investigating the impact of VTS on perinatal outcome was conducted. Parturients were classified into three groups: those pregnancies that started with double fetal sacs and spontaneously reduced into one (VTS), those with dichorionic twins, and those with singleton pregnancies. Statistical analysis included multiple logistic regression models to control for possible confounders. Tertiary university medical center. The study involved 252,994 singleton deliveries between the years 1988 and 2012. None. The impact of VTS on perinatal outcome. During the study period, 278 pregnancies with VTS were compared with 1,801 pregnancies of dichorionic twins and 252,994 pregnancies of singletons. A significant linear association was documented among the three groups and various adverse outcomes, including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), very low birth weight (VLBW), and perinatal mortality. The higher risk was noted in the VTS group, and the lowest in singletons. Using multivariable logistic regression models, while controlling for confounders such as fertility treatment and maternal age, VTS (as compared with singletons) was found to be an independent risk factor for several adverse perinatal outcomes including GDM, IUGR, VLBW, low Apgar scores, and perinatal mortality (adjusted odds ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals, 1.4 [1.01-2.0], 2.7 [1.7-4.3], 6.9 [4.7-10.2], 1.9 [1.1-3.3], 2.4 [1.2-4.5]). Pregnancies with VTS are associated with an adverse perinatal outcome, even after controlling for confounders such as fertility treatment and maternal age. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Fertility and Sterility 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.02.009 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To investigate whether obesity during pregnancy poses a risk for subsequent maternal long-term cardiovascular morbidity, after controlling for diabetes and hypertensive disorders. Study design: Data were analyzed from consecutive pregnant women who delivered between 1988 and 1999, and were followed-up until 2010. Long-term cardiovascular morbidity was compared among women with and without obesity in pregnancy (maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) or more). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to compare cumulative incidence of cardiovascular hospitalizations. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for long-term cardiovascular hospitalizations. Results: During the study period 46 688 women met the inclusion criteria, 1221 (2.6%) had a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). During a follow-up period of more than 10 years, patients with obesity had higher rates of simple cardiovascular events and total number of cardiovascular hospitalizations. These complications tended to occur at a shorter interval (mean 4871 days ± 950 versus 5060 days ± 1140; p = 0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia and maternal age, obesity was independently associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations (adjusted HR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0-3.4). Conclusion: Obesity during pregnancy is an independent risk factor for long-term cardiovascular morbidity, and these complications tend to occur earlier. Pregnancy should be considered as a window of opportunity to predict future health problems and as an opportunity to promote women's health. Obese parturients might benefit from cardiovascular risk screening that could lead to early detection and secondary prevention of cardiovascular morbidity.
    Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine 03/2015; 210(1):1-5. DOI:10.3109/14767058.2015.1013932 · 1.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the association between uric acid (UA) level during pregnancy and future maternal hospitalization for atherosclerotic-related morbidity. A case-control study was conducted including women who delivered between the years 2000 to 2012 and subsequently developed atherosclerotic morbidity at least 1 year after their last delivery (n=588) and controls (n=3645). The mean follow-up duration was 57.8±35.6 months and 77±43.4 months, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios for hospitalizations. A significant linear association was documented between UA during pregnancy and long-term maternal-related atherosclerotic morbidity. A Cox proportional hazard model, controlling for the confounders gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, obesity, maternal age, creatinine level, and gestational week at index pregnancy showed that UA ≥5.6 mg/dL during pregnancy remained independently associated with long-term total hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.86; P<.001). High UA level during pregnancy may predict maternal atherosclerotic morbidity. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Clinical Hypertension 03/2015; 17(6). DOI:10.1111/jch.12535 · 2.96 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate obstetrical risk factors predicting failure of vaginal delivery and an emergency cesarean section (CS) for the second twin after vaginal delivery of the first twin. In addition, the study was aimed to define perinatal outcomes of the second twin. A retrospective study was conducted, comparing all deliveries of twins in which CS was performed for the second twin to those in which both twins were delivered vaginally during the years 1988-2010. Women with multiple gestations in which a CS was performed for both twins were excluded from the study. During the study period, 1966 vaginal deliveries of the first twin were recorded; 192 involved emergency CS for the second twin. Risk factors for emergency CS of the second twin were preterm delivery, previous CS, placental abruption and breech presentation of the second twin. Perinatal outcomes did not differ between the groups. Risk factors for emergency cesarean section of the second twin are preterm delivery, previous CS, placental abruption and breech presentation. Nevertheless, short-term perinatal outcomes are comparable to twins delivered vaginally.
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 02/2015; 208(1). DOI:10.1007/s00404-015-3667-4 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S34. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.093 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S381-S382. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.994 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S268. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.582 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S387. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.1006 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • Eli Kabakov · Eyal Sheiner · Michael Friger
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S383. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.997 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S338. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.897 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2015; 212(1):S119. DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2014.10.257 · 3.97 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
1,164.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2015
    • Soroka Medical Center
      • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Be'er Sheva`, Southern District, Israel
  • 1998–2015
    • Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
      • • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Faculty of Health Sciences
      Be'er Sheva`, Southern District, Israel
  • 2011
    • Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2005–2009
    • Rush University Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
    • Hadassah Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      Yerushalayim, Jerusalem, Israel
  • 2008
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders
      North Carolina, United States
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2007
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
    • Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
      Rochester, New York, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Ulsan
      • College of Medicine
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
    • Sheba Medical Center
      Gan, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2003
    • McGill University
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada