Jennifer A Quinn

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States

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Publications (47)366.44 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Temozolomide, an alkylating agent, has shown promise in treating primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). The enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs alkylating damage, such as that induced by temozolomide. We hypothesized that MGMT immunohistochemistry would predict resistance to temozolomide in PCNSL. A retrospective study of newly-diagnosed and recurrent PCNSL patients treated at our institution was conducted to study the predictive value of MGMT immunohistochemistry for response to temozolomide. 20 patients who were treated with temozolomide as a single agent were identified during the study time period. 6/20 patients demonstrated a response, corresponding to an objective response rate of 30 % (95 % CI 8-52). Five patients with low MGMT level (<30 %) showed a response to temozolomide. Only one of 10 patients (10 %) with high MGMT level (≥30 %) exhibited a response to temozolomide. Small sample numbers precluded formal statistical comparisons. Two patients with complete response remain alive without progressive disease 6.7 and 7.2 years after temozolomide initiation. Immunohistochemistry can be performed on small biopsies to selectively assess MGMT status in tumor versus surrounding inflammation. MGMT analysis by immunohistochemistry may predict response to temozolomide in PCNSL and should be prospectively investigated.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 05/2013; · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This phase II trial evaluated efficacy and safety of temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) before radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Prior to radiotherapy, patients were treated with a maximum of three 6-week cycles of TMZ and CPT-11. Patients received TMZ at a dose of 200 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5 and CPT-11 on days 1, 8, 22, and 29, with a dose adjustment for enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug use. The primary end point was objective response rate (ORR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), safety, and tumor O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression. Of the 42 patients treated, 8 (19%) patients achieved a partial response. Median PFS and median OS were 3.1 and 13.8 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 AEs were documented in 36% of patients, most of which were hematologic (29%). Twenty-four percent of patients had grade 3 or 4 non-hematologic AEs, with gastrointestinal AEs being the most common (12%) Two patients died, one of intracranial hemorrhage and one of treatment-related renal failure. Low MGMT expression, compared with high MGMT expression, showed no significant difference in ORR (25 vs. 8%), median PFS (14 vs. 5 months) or OS (21 vs. 15 months). Although TMZ plus CPT-11 is at least comparable in efficacy to TMZ alone, this combination appears more toxic and poorly tolerated. The lack of correlation of activity with MGMT expression is intriguing, but needs further evaluation in subsequent trials.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 07/2009; 95(3):393-400. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current study was a phase 1 clinical trial conducted with patients who had recurrent or progressive malignant glioma (MG). The trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) when administered with temozolomide (TMZ) and O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). All 3 drugs, CPT-11, TMZ, and O(6)-BG, were administered on Day 1 of a 21-day treatment. First, patients were treated with a 1-hour bolus infusion of O(6)-BG at a dose of 120 mg/m(2) followed immediately by a 48-hour continuous infusion of O(6)-BG at a dose of 30 mg/m(2)/d. Second, within 60 minutes of the end of the 1-hour bolus infusion of O(6)-BG, TMZ was administered orally at a dose of 355 mg/m(2). Third, 1 hour after administration of TMZ, CPT-11 was infused over 90 minutes. Patients were accrued to 1 of 2 strata based on CYP3A1- and CYP3A4-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) use; dose escalation was conducted independently within these strata. Fifty-five patients were enrolled. In both strata, the dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic and included grade 4 neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, leukopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. For Stratum 1 (EIAEDs), when TMZ was administered at a dose of 355 mg/m(2), the MTD of CPT-11 was determined to be 120 mg/m(2). In contrast, for Stratum 2 (no EIAEDs), when TMZ was administered at a dose of 200 mg/m(2), the MTD of CPT-11 was determined to be 80 mg/m(2). The authors believe that the results of the current study provide the foundation for a phase 2 trial of O(6)-BG in combination with CPT-11 and TMZ in patients with MG.
    Cancer 05/2009; 115(13):2964-70. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This phase I clinical trial conducted with patients who had recurrent or progressive malignant glioma (MG) was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity of three different 5-day dosing regimens of temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). Both TMZ and O(6)-BG were administered on days 1-5 of a 28-day treatment cycle. A bolus infusion of O(6)-BG was administered at 120 mg/m(2) over 1 h on days 1, 3, and 5, along with a continuous infusion of O(6)-BG at 30 mg/m(2)/day. TMZ was administered at the end of the first bolus infusion of O(6)-BG and then every 24 h for 5 days during the continuous infusion of O(6)-BG. Patients were accrued to one of three 5-day dosing regimens of TMZ. Twenty-nine patients were enrolled into this study. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were grade 4 neutropenia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The MTD for TMZ for the three different 5-day dosing schedules was determined as follows: schedule 1, 200 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 2-5; schedule 2, 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5; and schedule 3, 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5 while receiving pegfilgrastim. Thus, the 5-day TMZ dosing schedule that maximized the total dose of TMZ when combined with O(6)-BG was schedule 1. This study provides the foundation for a phase II trial of O(6)-BG in combination with a 5-day dosing schedule of TMZ in TMZ-resistant MG.
    Neuro-Oncology 04/2009; 11(5):556-61. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This phase II trial was designed to define the role of O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG) in restoring temozolomide sensitivity in patients with recurrent or progressive, temozolomide-resistant malignant glioma and to evaluate the safety of administering O(6)-BG in combination with temozolomide. Patients were accrued into two independent strata on the basis of histology: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and anaplastic glioma. Both temozolomide and O(6)-BG were administered on day 1 of a 28-day treatment cycle. Patients were administered a 1-hour O(6)-BG infusion at a dose of 120 mg/m(2) followed immediately by a 48-hour infusion at a dose of 30 mg/m(2)/d. Temozolomide was administered orally within 60 minutes of the end of the 1-hour O(6)-BG infusion at a dose of 472 mg/m(2). The primary end point was objective response rate. Secondary end points included progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Sixty-six of 67 patients who enrolled were treated with temozolomide and O(6)-BG. One of 34 patients (3%) with GBM (95% CI, 0.1% to 15%) and five of 32 assessable patients (16%) with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5% to 33%) were responders. The most commonly reported adverse events were grade 4 hematologic events experienced in 48% of the patients. O(6)-BG when added to a 1-day dosing regimen of temozolomide was able to restore temozolomide sensitivity in patients with temozolomide-resistant anaplastic glioma, but there seemed to be no significant restoration of temozolomide sensitivity in patients with temozolomide-resistant GBM.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2009; 27(8):1262-7. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This phase II trial was designed to define the efficacy of Gliadel wafers in combination with an infusion of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG) that suppresses tumor O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) levels in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme for 5 days and to evaluate the safety of this combination therapy. This was a phase II, open-label, single center trial. On gross total resection of the tumor, up to eight Gliadel wafers were implanted. Bolus infusion of O6-BG was administered at 120 mg/m2 over 1 hour on days 1, 3, and 5, along with a continuous infusion at 30 mg/m2/d. The primary end points were 6-month overall survival (OS) and safety, and the secondary end points were 1-year, 2-year, and median OS. Fifty-two patients were accrued. The 6-month OS was 82% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 72-93%]. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 47% (95% CI, 35-63%) and 10% (95% CI, 3-32%), respectively. The median OS was 50.3 weeks (95% CI, 36.1-69.4 weeks). Treatment-related toxicity with this drug combination included grade 3 hydrocephalus (9.6%), grade 3 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak (19.2%), and grade 3 CSF/brain infection (13.4%). The efficacy of implanted Gliadel wafers may be improved with the addition of O6-BG. Although systemically administered O6-BG can be coadministered with Gliadel wafers safely, it may increase the risk of hydrocephalus, CSF leak, and CSF/brain infection. Future trials are required to verify that inhibition of tumor AGT levels by O6-BG results in increased efficacy of Gliadel wafers without added toxicity.
    Clinical Cancer Research 03/2009; 15(3):1064-8. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although patients with newly diagnosed WHO grade 3 malignant glioma have a more favorable prognosis than those with WHO grade 4 malignant glioma, salvage therapies following recurrence offer essentially palliative benefit. We did a phase II trial of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor, in combination with irinotecan for patients with recurrent grade 3 malignant glioma. Upon documentation of adequate safety among an initial cohort of nine patients treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan every 14 days, a second cohort (n=24) was treated with bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) every 3 weeks with irinotecan on days 1, 8, 22, and 29 of each 42-day cycle. For both cohorts, the dose of irinotecan was 340 mg/m(2) for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED) and 125 mg/m(2) for patients not on EIAEDs. After each 6-week cycle, patients were evaluated with a physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. The 6-month progression-free survival was 55% (95% confidence interval, 36-70%). The 6-month overall survival was 79% (95% confidence interval, 61-89%). Twenty patients (61%) had at least a partial response. Outcome did not differ between the two treatment cohorts. Significant adverse events were infrequent and included a central nervous system hemorrhage in one patient, and one patient who developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Bevacizumab and irinotecan is an active regimen with acceptable toxicity for patients with recurrent WHO grade 3 malignant glioma.
    Clinical Cancer Research 12/2008; 14(21):7068-73. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) or standard salvage therapy was evaluated in patients with recurrent medulloblastoma (MBL) using retrospective chart review of all patients with recurrent MBL treated at Duke University Medical Center between 1995 and 2005 and who had undergone HDC with or without radiotherapy (RT) or standard salvage therapy after relapse. A total of 30 patients were diagnosed with recurrent MBL after standard RT alone or chemotherapy with RT. Nineteen patients (7 who received no RT before recurrence [group A] and 12 who received definitive RT before recurrence [group B]) underwent surgery and/or induction chemotherapy followed by HDC plus autologous stem-cell rescue. Eleven patients (group C) underwent standard salvage therapy. Six of seven group A patients also received standard RT just before or after recovery from HDC, and 5 of 12 group B patients received adjuvant palliative focal RT post-HDC. At a median follow-up of 28 months, three of seven patients in group A are alive and disease-free at >or=34, >or=110, and >or=116 months, respectively, post-HDC. All patients in groups B and C have died of tumor, at a median of 35 months and 26 months from HDC and standard salvage therapy, respectively. HDC or standard salvage therapy was ineffective in our patients with recurrent MBL who had received standard RT before recurrence. The favorable impact of HDC on disease control in the two long-term survivors cannot be clearly established due to the cofounding effect of definitive RT postrecurrence.
    Neuro-Oncology 09/2008; 10(5):745-51. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A major mechanism of resistance to methylating agents, including temozolomide, is the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). Preclinical data indicates that defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) results in tolerance to temozolomide regardless of AGT activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in samples from patients with both newly diagnosed malignant gliomas and those who have failed temozolomide therapy. The roles of AGT and MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in glioblastoma multiforme were assessed by immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability (MSI), respectively. The mutation status of the MSH6 gene, a proposed correlate of temozolomide resistance, was determined by direct sequencing and compared with data from immunofluorescent detection of MSH6 protein and reverse transcription-PCR amplification of MSH6 RNA. Seventy percent of newly diagnosed and 78% of failed-therapy glioblastoma multiforme samples expressed nuclear AGT protein in > or = 20% of cells analyzed, suggesting alternate means of resistance in 20% to 30% of cases. Single loci MSI was observed in 3% of patient samples; no sample showed the presence of high MSI. MSI was not shown to correlate with MSH6 mutation or loss of MSH6 protein expression. Although high AGT levels may mediate resistance in a portion of these samples, MMR deficiency does not seem to be responsible for mediating temozolomide resistance in adult malignant glioma. Accordingly, the presence of a fraction of samples exhibiting both low AGT expression and MMR proficiency suggests that additional mechanisms of temozolomide resistance are operational in the clinic.
    Clinical Cancer Research 08/2008; 14(15):4859-68. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and assess the efficacy and toxicity, among newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients, of administering (131)I-labeled murine antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 ((131)I-81C6) into a surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) to achieve a patient-specific, 44-Gy boost to the 2-cm SCRC margin. A radioactivity dose of (131)I-81C6 calculated to achieve a 44-Gy boost to the SCRC was administered, followed by conventional external beam radiotherapy (XRT) and chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the study: 16 with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 5 with anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty patients received the targeted 44-Gy boost (+/-10%) to the SCRC. Attributable toxicity was mild and limited to reversible grade 3 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia (n = 3; 14%), CNS wound infections (n = 3; 14%), and headache (n = 2; 10%). With a median follow-up of 151 weeks, median overall survival times for all patients and those with GBM are 96.6 and 90.6 weeks, respectively; 87% of GBM patients are alive at 1 year. It is feasible to consistently achieve a 44-Gy boost dose to the SCRC margin with patient-specific dosing of (131)I-81C6. Our study regimen ((131)I-81C6 + XRT + temozolomide) was well tolerated and had encouraging survival. To determine if selection of good-prognosis patients affects outcome associated with this approach, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a trial randomizing newly diagnosed GBM patients to either our study regimen or standard XRT plus temozolomide.
    Neuro-Oncology 05/2008; 10(2):182-9. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), the proto-oncogene product c-kit, and the fusion protein Bcr-Abl, when administered for 8 days in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) to malignant glioma (MG) patients. MG patients who had not failed prior TMZ were eligible to receive TMZ at a dose of 150-200 mg/m(2) per day on days 4-8 plus imatinib mesylate administered orally on days 1-8 of each 4-week cycle. Patients were stratified based on concurrent administration of CYP3A4-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs). The imatinib dose was escalated in successive cohorts of patients independently for each stratum. Imatinib, at doses ranging from 400 mg to 1,200 mg, was administered with TMZ to 65 patients: 52 (80%) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 13 (20%) with grade III MG. At enrollment, 34 patients (52%) had stable disease, and 33 (48%) had progressive disease; 30 patients (46%) were on EIAEDs. The MTD of imatinib for patients concurrently receiving or not receiving EIAEDs was 1,000 mg. DLTs were hematologic, gastrointestinal, renal, and hepatic. Pharmacokinetic analyses revealed lowered exposures and enhanced clearance among patients on EIAEDs. Among GBM patients with stable disease at enrollment (n=28), the median progression-free and overall survival times were 41.7 and 56.1 weeks, respectively. Imatinib doses up to 1,000 mg/day for 8 consecutive days are well tolerated when combined with standard TMZ dosing for MG patients. A subsequent phase 2 study is required to further evaluate the efficacy of this regimen for this patient population.
    Neuro-Oncology 04/2008; 10(3):330-40. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the case of a patient with transcobalamin II deficiency, hypogammaglobulinemia, absent corpus callosum, and mental retardation who presented at an early age with colorectal cancer and multifocal anaplastic astrocytoma. He was found to have a possible germline mutation of the PMS2 gene, as evidenced by absent protein expression in both normal and tumor tissues. His parents were found to be carriers of a nonsense mutation of the PMS2 gene.
    Neuro-Oncology 03/2008; 10(1):93-7. · 6.18 Impact Factor
  • J Clin Oncol 26: 2008 (May 20 suppl; abstr 2021). 01/2008; 26(May 20 suppl):abstr 2021.
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    ABSTRACT: Malignant gliomas represent the majority of primary brain tumors, and the prognosis of the patients afflicted with these tumors has been historically dismal, with almost uniform progressive neurologic impairment and rapid death. Even with multimodal treatment using surgery, focal radiation, and chemotherapy, no major strides were made until recently. The development of interstitial BCNU wafers (carmustine wafers, Gliadel((R))) has led to promising results in the treatment of a selected patients with malignant gliomas, as well as with other intracranial malignancies.BCNU is one of the first systemic chemotherapies which had obtained United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the treatment of brain tumors. However, systemic use has been hampered by the modest prolongation of survival and by the prolonged myelosuppression and potentially fatal pulmonary toxicity. The development of interstitial therapies with BCNU represented a great step forward, allowing direct delivery to the tumor bed, with virtually no systemic toxicities. Clinical studies of BCNU wafers have showed good efficacy in both newly diagnosed and recurrent gliomas, as well as a possible therapeutic role in other primary or secondary intracranial malignancies. New studies are currently underway trying to improve the efficacy of the BCNU wafers (Gliadel((R))) by combining them with different systemic chemotherapies. An overview of the current knowledge ranging from the preclinical developments, to the efficacy and safety seen in the clinical trials and in clinical practice following the drug approval to the future avenues of research is therefore timely.
    Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 11/2007; 3(5):707-15.
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme is poor, with a median survival of 3 to 6 months. We performed a phase II trial of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor, in combination with irinotecan. This phase II trial included two cohorts of patients. The initial cohort, comprising 23 patients, received bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg plus irinotecan every 2 weeks. The dose of irinotecan was based on the patient's anticonvulsant: Patients taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) received 340 mg/m2, and patients not taking EIAEDs received 125 mg/m2. After this regimen was deemed safe and effective, the irinotecan schedule was changed to an accepted brain tumor regimen of four doses in 6 weeks, in anticipation of a phase III randomized trial of irinotecan versus irinotecan and bevacizumab. The second cohort, comprising 12 patients, received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days and irinotecan on days 1, 8, 22, and 29. Each cycle was 6 weeks long and concluded with patient evaluations, including magnetic resonance imaging. The 6-month progression-free survival among all 35 patients was 46% (95% CI, 32% to 66%). The 6-month overall survival was 77% (95% CI, 64% to 92%). Twenty of the 35 patients (57%; 95% CI, 39% to 74%) had at least a partial response. One patient developed a CNS hemorrhage, which occurred in his 10th cycle. Four patients developed thromboembolic complications (deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary emboli). Bevacizumab and irinotecan is an effective treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and has moderate toxicity.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 11/2007; 25(30):4722-9. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Malignant gliomas are relatively uncommon but lethal cancers. Despite recent research efforts in cancer therapy, the prognosis of patients with malignant gliomas has remained dismal. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of glioma may lead to a rational development of new therapies. Despite the genetic heterogeneity of malignant gliomas, common aberrations in the signaling elements of the growth and survival pathways are found. New treatments have emerged to target molecules in these signaling pathways with the goal to increase specific efficacy and minimize toxicity. Monoclonal antibodies and low molecular-weight kinase inhibitors are the most common classes of agents in targeted cancer treatment. Most clinical trials of these agents as monotherapies have failed to demonstrate survival benefit in unselected malignant glioma patient populations. Several mechanisms of treatment failure have been demonstrated. In response, multitargeted kinase inhibitors and combinations of single-targeted kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome therapeutic resistance. In addition, multimodality combinations of targeted agents with radiation, chemotherapy, or immunotherapy/vaccines may enhance treatment efficacy. Future development of these agents will require advances in discovery and validation of new molecular targets, improvement of therapeutic delivery, and identification of correlative biomarkers. Novel clinical trial designs and endpoints may increase the efficiency of new drug evaluation. In this review, the authors discussed the current understanding of molecular pathogenesis and the development of molecularly targeted therapies in malignant glioma.
    Cancer 08/2007; 110(1):13-24. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent reports demonstrate the activity of imatinib mesylate, an ATP-mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We performed the current phase 2 study to evaluate this regimen among patients with recurrent WHO grade III malignant glioma (MG). Patients with grade III MG at any recurrence, received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Clinical assessments were performed monthly and radiographic assessments were obtained at least every 2 months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. All patients had progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. The median number of episodes of prior progression was 2 (range, 1-7) and the median number of prior treatment regimens was 3 (range, 1-8). With a median follow-up of 82.9 weeks, 24% of patients were progression-free at 6 months. The radiographic response rate was 10%, while 33% achieved stable disease. Among patients who achieved at least stable disease at first evaluation, the 6-month and 12-month PFS rates were 53% and 29%, respectively. The most common grade 3 or greater toxicities were hematologic and complicated less than 4% of administered courses. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea, is well tolerated and associated with anti-tumor activity in some patients with recurrent grade 3 MG.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 06/2007; 83(1):53-60. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a phase II study to assess the efficacy of oral temozolomide (TMZ) in children with progressive low-grade glioma. Thirty eligible patients were enrolled on this study. Median age at enrollment was 10 years (range, 4-18 years). Eligible patients received TMZ (200 mg/m(2) per day) by mouth for five days every four weeks. Patients received a median of nine cycles (range, 2-12 cycles) of treatment. Best responses in the 26 patients (86%) with optic pathway glioma (OPG)/pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) included partial response in 3 patients (11%), minor response in 1 (4%), stable disease in 10 (38%), and progressive disease in 12 (46%). Only one of four patients with fibrillary astrocytoma had stable disease for 29 months after TMZ. The overall disease stabilization rate in patients with OPG/PA was 54%, and disease control was maintained for a median interval of 34 months. Seventeen of 26 patients had progressive disease either on or off therapy, and three have died of disease. The two-year progression-free and overall survivals in patients with OPG/PA were 49% (95% CI, 30%-67%) and 96% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. Worst toxicity related to TMZ in all 30 patients included grade 2-4 thrombocytopenia in seven patients, grade 2-4 neutropenia in seven, grade 2 skin rash in one, and intratumor hemorrhage in one. TMZ given in this schedule was successful in stabilizing disease in a significant proportion of the patients with OPG/PA, with manageable toxicity.
    Neuro-Oncology 05/2007; 9(2):161-8. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrent grade III-IV gliomas have a dismal prognosis with minimal improvements in survival seen following currently available salvage therapy. This study was conducted to determine if the combination of a novel antiangiogenic therapy, bevacizumab, and a cytotoxic agent, irinotecan, is safe and effective for patients with recurrent grade III-IV glioma. We conducted a phase II trial of bevacizumab and irinotecan in adults with recurrent grade III-IV glioma. Patients with evidence of intracranial hemorrhage on initial brain magnetic resonance imaging were excluded. Patients were scheduled to receive bevacizumab and irinotecan i.v. every 2 weeks of a 6-week cycle. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg. The dose of irinotecan was determined based on antiepileptic use: patients taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs received 340 mg/m(2), whereas patients not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs received 125 mg/m(2). Toxicity and response were assessed. Thirty-two patients were assessed (23 with grade IV glioma and 9 with grade III glioma). Radiographic responses were noted in 63% (20 of 32) of patients (14 of 23 grade IV patients and 6 of 9 grade III patients). The median progression-free survival was 23 weeks for all patients (95% confidence interval, 15-30 weeks; 20 weeks for grade IV patients and 30 weeks for grade III patients). The 6-month progression-free survival probability was 38% and the 6-month overall survival probability was 72%. No central nervous system hemorrhages occurred, but three patients developed deep venous thromboses or pulmonary emboli, and one patient had an arterial ischemic stroke. The combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan is an active regimen for recurrent grade III-IV glioma with acceptable toxicity.
    Clinical Cancer Research 03/2007; 13(4):1253-9. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cloretazine (VNP40101M) is a newly synthesized alkylating agent belonging to a novel class of alkylating agents called 1,2-bis(sulfonyl)hydrazines. Agents that belong to this class do not produce vinylating and chloroethylating species, and hence this class of alkylating agents is thought to have minimal systemic toxicity. Cloretazine produces two short-lived active species: 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl) hydrazine (a chloroethylating species) and a thiophilic carbamoylating methylisocyanate species. The chloroethylating species preferentially produces lesions at the O(6) position of guanine. The methylisocyanate species may inhibit O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, an important mechanism of resistance against alkylating agents. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of Cloretazine in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. The basis for the determination of efficacy was the proportion of patients alive without evidence of disease progression six months after initiation of treatment. Patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme received Cloretazine (300 mg/m(2)) intravenously every six weeks. Radiographic response, survival data, and toxicity were assessed. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. Median age was 56 years; 24 patients (75%) were men. At six months, two patients were alive and progression free, so the six-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 6%. The median PFS was 6.3 weeks. There were no objective radiographic responses. Twelve patients had stable disease for at least one cycle, but only two patients received more than three cycles. Nine patients experienced grade 4 thrombocytopenia and three patients experienced grade 4 neutropenia. Cloretazine administered every six weeks was relatively well tolerated, although this schedule has insignificant activity for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.
    Neuro-Oncology 02/2007; 9(1):70-4. · 6.18 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
366.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2013
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Surgery
      Durham, NC, United States
  • 2009
    • Duke University
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • School of Medicine
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States