Wolf-Henning Boehncke

University of Geneva, Genève, Geneva, Switzerland

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Publications (140)620.31 Total impact

  • Article: Psoriasis
    Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Michael P Schön
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, genetic disease manifesting in the skin or joints or both. A diverse team of clinicians with a range of expertise is often needed to treat the disease. Psoriasis provides many challenges including high prevalence, chronicity, disfiguration, disability, and associated comorbidity. Understanding the role of immune function in psoriasis and the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune system has helped to manage this complex disease, which affects patients far beyond the skin. In this Seminar, we highlight the clinical diversity of psoriasis and associated comorbid diseases. We describe recent developments in psoriasis epidemiology, pathogenesis, and genetics to better understand present trends in psoriasis management. Our key objective is to raise awareness of the complexity of this multifaceted disease, the potential of state-of-the-art therapeutic approaches, and the need for early diagnosis and comprehensive management of patients with psoriasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    The Lancet 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61909-7
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) substantially impacts the management of psoriatic disease. Objective: This study aimed to generate an interdisciplinary national consensus on recommendations of how PsA should be managed. Methods: Based on a systematic literature search, an interdisciplinary expert group identified important domains and went through 3 rounds of a Delphi exercise, followed by a nominal group discussion to generate specific recommendations. Results: A strong consensus was reached on numerous central messages regarding the impact of PsA, screening procedures, organization of the interaction between dermatologists and rheumatologists, and treatment goals. Conclusion: These recommendations can serve as a template for similar initiatives in other countries. At the same time, they highlight the need to take into account the impact of the respective national health care system. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Dermatology 01/2015; DOI:10.1159/000367688
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous guidelines and recommendations exist for the treatment of psoriasis in various populations. One important population is patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have symptoms of both joint and skin disease. In patients with both facets of psoriatic disease, skin and joints must be treated separately, but also simultaneously. As several systemic therapies are approved for either one or both, the concept of treating both facets with the same drug is feasible. This review summarizes evidence from studies in patients with PsA on the efficacy of these drugs on psoriatic skin disease in these patients.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 11/2014; 41(11):2301-2305. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.140880
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke
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    ABSTRACT: It is now well established that psoriatic disease is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. Screening guidelines and expert recommendations for CV risk factors have been published, but these are primarily directed to specific specialists (e.g., cardiologists or diabetologists) and may not be well known in common practice. The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and other organizations are interested in adapting current comorbidity screening guidelines for use by dermatologists and rheumatologists. The resulting checklists and algorithms will need to be evaluated for practicability and performance.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 06/2014; 41(6):1224-6. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.140175
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    ABSTRACT: In the United States, access to care is the number one issue facing our patients with dermatological conditions. In part, this is because we do not have outcome measures that are useful in clinical practice and available in databases where payers and governmental agencies can compare the performance of physicians and treatments. There is a growing recognition that insufficient attention has been paid to the outcomes measured in clinical trials and subsequently in clinical practice. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures group includes all willing stakeholders: patients, physicians, payers, and pharmaceutical scientists. As reported herein, the group's goal is to develop outcome measures in dermatology that address the needs of all involved.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 06/2014; 41(6):1227-9. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.140176
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Brian Kirby, Diamant Thaci
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    ABSTRACT: The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) organized its second Fellows Symposium adjacent to the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) congress in Istanbul in October 2013. Wolf-Henning Boehncke from Geneva, Brian Kirby from Dublin, and Diamant Thaci from Lübeck formed the faculty. The 9 best-ranked abstracts submitted to this symposium were presented and discussed in detail. Five abstracts focused on comorbidities in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis; summaries of all abstracts are included herein.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 06/2014; 41(6):1197-9. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.140169
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Sandra Boehncke
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is among the most common skin diseases, exhibiting a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Joint involvement in the form of psoriatic arthritis is readily recognised, but both frequency and severity of this manifestation have long been underestimated. More recently, additional important diseases have been found to be associated with psoriasis, including the metabolic syndrome (or components thereof), cardiovascular diseases, lymphoma, and anxiety/depression. In the past, psoriasis treatment aimed at suppressing acute rashes. Current concepts regard psoriasis as a chronic systemic inflammatory condition and cardiovascular risk factor. In the light of this concept, long-term disease control through systemic maintenance therapy is increasingly recommended by experts. This approach became feasible with the approval of numerous biologics for the treatment of psoriasis. But to really address all medical needs of psoriasis patients, a truly interdisciplinary, comprehensive management approach is needed. Several national societies have already published algorithms to ensure that this need will be implemented in the daily practice of dermatologists and nondermatologists alike.
    Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift 04/2014; 144:w13968. DOI:10.4414/smw.2014.13968
  • 41st Annual Meeting of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft-Dermatologische-Forschung; 03/2014
  • 41st Annual Meeting of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft-Dermatologische-Forschung; 03/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract is missing (Short).
    Acta Dermato-Venereologica 02/2014; 94(5). DOI:10.2340/00015555-1778
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    Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft 01/2014; 12(1):48-58. DOI:10.1111/ddg_suppl.12233
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    ABSTRACT: The German psoriasis registry PsoBest records the long-term efficacy, safety, patient benefit and treatment regimens of psoriasis. Patients with moderate or severe psoriasis are included in PsoBest when treatment with a conventional systemic agent or biologic is started for the first time. Observation time is five years. Standardized physician and patient case report forms are obtained every three to six months. Baseline data of patients included by 31 December 2012 are presented and compared to the national health care study PsoHealth 2007 (n = 2,009). 602 dermatology practices and clinics have been registered and 199 have recruited n = 2,556 patients (63 % by practices, 37 % by clinics). Initially, n = 808 received biologics (316 adalimumab, 34 efalizumab, 209 etanercept, 75 infliximab, 22 golimumab, 152 ustekinumab) and n = 1,651 conventional systemic therapy (928 fumaric acid esters, 518 methotrexate, 161 cyclosporine A, 191 other drugs or UV treatment). Compared to PsoHealth, patients in PsoBest had on average a higher disease severity (PASI 14.7 vs. 10.1; DLQI 11.0 vs. 7.5; EQ-5D VAS 54.0 vs. 64.5), shorter disease duration (18.2 vs. 21.3 yrs.), lower age (47.3 vs. 51.5), higher rates of psoriatic arthritis (20.5 vs. 19.1 %) and nail psoriasis (55.0 vs. 35.6 %). On average patients receiving biologics were younger, more often male and had higher disease severity and comorbidity. Patients in PsoBest represent patients with a high burden of disease.
    Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft 01/2014; 12(1):48-57. DOI:10.1111/ddg.12233
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    ABSTRACT: Actinic keratosis (AK) affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence continues to increase. AK lesions are caused by chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure, and the presence of two or more AK lesions along with photodamage should raise the consideration of a diagnosis of field cancerization. Effective treatment of individual lesions as well as field cancerization is essential for good long-term outcomes. The Swiss Registry of Actinic Keratosis Treatment (REAKT) Working Group has developed clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of field cancerization in patients who present with AK. These guidelines are intended to serve as a resource for physicians as to the most appropriate treatment and management of AK and field cancerization based on current evidence and the combined practical experience of the authors. Treatment of AK and field cancerization should be driven by consideration of relevant patient, disease, and treatment factors, and appropriate treatment decisions will differ from patient to patient. Prevention measures and screening recommendations are discussed, and special considerations related to management of immunocompromised patients are provided.
    Swiss medical weekly: official journal of the Swiss Society of Infectious Diseases, the Swiss Society of Internal Medicine, the Swiss Society of Pneumology 01/2014; 144:w14026. DOI:10.4414/smw.2014.14026
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Michael P Schön
    Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft 12/2013; 11(12):1133-1134. DOI:10.1111/ddg.12243
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    ABSTRACT: The endothelial wall plays a crucial role in various diseases as it serves as the barrier between circulatory system and organ tissue. Inflammation-driven insulin resistance and subsequent endothelial dysfunction represent a pathomechanism in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. It was recently suggested that insulin resistance also contributes to the pathogenesis of psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. However, it is not clear whether similar mechanisms at the endothelium contribute to the disease. In this study, we ask which endothelial cells are most suitable to address this question. We investigated the insulin response of four cell types (primary cells and cell lines) representing different vascular beds (micro- and macrovascular cells) in the presence of different pro-inflammatory cytokines. All four cell types used responded well to insulin; however, the ability to become resistant to insulin due to an inflammatory stimulus by cytokines involved in psoriasis (e.g. IL-1β, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23 and TNF-α) was very heterogeneous and could not be attributed to the differential expression of the cognate cytokine receptors. We conclude that this disparity is due to the different origins and properties of the endothelial cells used. Thus, endothelial cells should be carefully selected for the purpose of the respective study, particularly when it comes to analysing the pathogenesis of a disease and the search of new molecular targets for innovative therapies.
    Experimental Dermatology 11/2013; 22(11):714-8. DOI:10.1111/exd.12235
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease, associated with significant comorbidity, for example, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD). This association implies that the risk to develop these diseases is commonly controlled or that the presence of one disease favours manifestation of the other. Therefore, we assessed the catalogue of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to analyse whether psoriasis, MetS and CHD share susceptibility loci. Interestingly, genetic control of psoriasis is almost completely independent from both MetS and CHD. In contrast, MetS and CHD share 10 common loci. Like by GWAS analysis, psoriasis susceptibility genes showed close clustering in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, while genes conferring susceptibility to MetS and CHD were interlinked separately. These findings lead to the hypothesis that the clinically observed co-occurrence of psoriasis with MetS and CHD may be due to a common environmental factor, for example, diet, which is known as a risk factor for all of these diseases.
    Experimental Dermatology 08/2013; 22(8):552-3. DOI:10.1111/exd.12192
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    ABSTRACT: At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) in Stockholm, Sweden, several GRAPPA members led a panel discussion on cardiovascular (CV) comorbidities of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The panelists discussed the role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of psoriasis, the possible effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors on CV comorbidities, and the effect of 12/23 monoclonal antibodies on CV outcomes. The panelists also addressed how lessons from CV comorbidity research could be applied to other areas of comorbidity research in psoriasis and PsA and identified future research directions in this area.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2013; 40(8):1434-7. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.130457
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Brian Kirby
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    ABSTRACT: The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) organized a Fellows Symposium adjacent to the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology (EADV) spring meeting in Verona, Italy, in 2012. Wolf-Henning Boehncke from Geneva and Brian Kirby from Dublin formed the faculty. Five papers were presented, followed by extended discussions among participants and faculty. Two contributions were on comorbidities of psoriasis patients and 2 on treatment of non-plaque-type psoriasis; the fifth presentation was a discussion of possible modes of action of vitamin D derivatives in the treatment of psoriasis. Summaries of all 5 papers are included here.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2013; 40(8):1410-2. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.130451
  • Philip J Mease, Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Dafna D Gladman
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    ABSTRACT: The 2012 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) was held in June 2012 in Stockholm, Sweden, and attended by rheumatologists, dermatologists, and representatives of biopharmaceutical companies and patient groups from around the world. In this Prologue we introduce discussions that were held among meeting attendees. Prior to the 2012 meeting, 2 GRAPPA members organized a Fellows Symposium adjacent to the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology meeting in Verona, where they discussed comorbidities and treatments of patients with psoriasis. The 2012 GRAPPA meeting began with a trainee symposium, where 30 rheumatology fellows and dermatology residents presented their research work. Other presentations and discussions included a review of arthritis mutilans; dermatology issues including screening tools for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and the instruments to measure psoriasis severity; cardiovascular and other comorbidities of psoriasis and PsA; development of criteria to define inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis; distinctions between peripheral spondyloarthritis and PsA; the status of an ultrasound outcome measure for dactylitis; and updates on several GRAPPA projects, including a study of biomarkers to predict structural damage in PsA, the ongoing video project, and several education initiatives.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2013; 40(8):1407-9. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.130450
  • Wolf-Henning Boehncke, Alan Menter
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) increases the disease burden associated with psoriasis by further diminishing quality of life, increasing health care costs and cardiovascular risk, and potentially causing progressive joint damage. The presence of PsA influences psoriasis treatment by increasing overall disease complexity and, within the framework of current guidelines and recommendations, requiring the use of conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors in order to prevent progressive joint damage. Despite its important impact, PsA is still under-diagnosed in dermatology practice. Dermatologists are well positioned to recognize and treat PsA, given that it characteristically presents, on average, 10 years subsequent to the appearance of skin symptoms. Regular screening of psoriasis patients for early evident joint symptoms should be incorporated into daily dermatologic practice. Although drugs effective in PsA are available, not all patients may respond to treatment, and others may lose their initial response over time. New investigational therapies, such as inhibitors of interleukin-17A, interleukin-12/23, Janus kinase 3, or phosphodiesterase-4, may address unmet needs in psoriatic disease, with further research needed to determine the role of these agents in reducing joint damage and other comorbidities.
    American Journal of Clinical Dermatology 06/2013; DOI:10.1007/s40257-013-0032-x

Publication Stats

2k Citations
620.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2015
    • University of Geneva
      • • Division of Dermatology
      • • Department of Pathology and Immunology (PATIM)
      Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
  • 2014
    • Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève
      • Service de dermatologie et vénéréologie
      Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
  • 1996–2013
    • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
      • • Center for Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 2011
    • Beverly Hospital, Boston MA
      Beverly, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2007
    • Hospital Frankfurt Hoechst
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 2002–2007
    • University Hospital Frankfurt
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 2006
    • Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
      • Universitäts-Hautklinik Kiel
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
  • 1994–2006
    • Universität Ulm
      • Institute for Laser Technologies in Medicine & Metrology
      Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Germany