Chevalia Robinson

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

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Publications (5)27.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to examine the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on differential gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of children with Fabry disease who had not previously been exposed to ERT. Thirteen children with Fabry disease (age range, 6.5-17.0 years) were studied as part of a 6-month, open-label study of ERT with agalsidase alfa. Paired blood samples were taken at the start of the study and after 6 months of ERT. Further blood samples were also taken from 16 age-matched control subjects. PBMCs were isolated and, following RNA extraction, differential gene expression analysis was performed using the Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarray. Twenty-one genes were determined to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of ERT-naïve children with Fabry disease compared with healthy controls; neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein ranked as the most significantly differentially expressed gene. Comparison of gene expression in children with Fabry disease prior to and after ERT showed that two genes were significantly differentially expressed (p < or = 0.05) following treatment; the expressed sequence tag (probe set ID, 243259_at) was downregulated, while expression of apoptosis-inducing factor was increased, possibly as an antioxidant counter-regulatory response. This study identifies a number of genes that are differentially expressed in a small cohort of children with Fabry disease relative to healthy controls. These genes may relate to the underlying biological abnormalities in Fabry disease.
    Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway: 1992). Supplement 04/2008; 97(457):48-52.
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    ABSTRACT: This study was performed to determine whether adult male patients with Fabry disease who demonstrate a continuing decline in renal function despite 2 to 4 yr of conventionally dosed agalsidase alfa therapy (0.2 mg/kg every other week [EOW]) show an improved slope of decline with weekly administration using the same dosage. Eleven (27%) of 41 adult male patients with Fabry disease who participated in long-term agalsidase alfa clinical trials and who had demonstrated a slope of decline in estimated GFR (eGFR) of > or =5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)/yr while receiving long-term treatment with agalsidase alfa at the currently recommended dosage of 0.2 mg/kg, infused EOW, were enrolled in this open-label, prospective study. Patients were switched from EOW to weekly infusions and followed for an additional 24 mo. Before switching to weekly dosing, eGFR was 53.7 +/- 6.3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (mean +/- SEM), and mean rate of change in eGFR was -8.0 +/- 0.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)/yr. During the 24-mo follow-up period after switching to weekly dosing, the mean rate of change in eGFR was observed to slow to -3.3 +/- 1.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/yr (P = 0.01 versus EOW). After switching to weekly dosing, three patients demonstrated an improvement in eGFR and six patients demonstrated a slowing in the rate of eGFR decline; only two patients failed to improve their eGFR slope. A multiple regression model confirmed that the weekly infusion regimen was the strongest explanatory variable for the change in eGFR (P = 0.0008), with a weaker contribution from the concomitant use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (P = 0.02). These results suggest that weekly infusions of agalsidase alfa at a dosage of 0.2 mg/kg may be beneficial in the subgroup of patients who have Fabry disease and whose kidney function continues to decline after 2 to 4 yr or more of standard EOW dosing.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 05/2007; 18(5):1576-83. · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is inherited as an X-linked disorder secondary to deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A, resulting in abnormal metabolism of substances containing alpha-d-galactosyl moieties. As a consequence, a multisystem disorder develops, culminating in strokes, progressive renal, and cardiac dysfunction. Signs and symptoms of Fabry disease become manifest in childhood, but diagnosis is often delayed. Thirteen children with Fabry disease (age range, 6.5-17 years) were studied as part of a 6-month open-label study of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa. Paired serum samples were drawn at the start of the study and after 6 months of ERT. Global protein changes in paired samples were compared by using differential stable isotope labeling of peptide lysine residues with O-methylisourea and subsequent nanoHPLC-tandem MS. Statistically significant decreases were observed for five proteins following ERT: alpha(2)-HS glycoprotein, vitamin D-binding protein, transferrin, Ig-alpha-2 C chain, and alpha-2-antiplasmin. The presence of low levels of alpha-2-antiplasmin and plasminogen was confirmed by alternate means in 34 consecutive patients, including four of five ERT-naïve subjects. Decreased alpha-2-antiplasmin was associated with a parallel increase in circulating VEGF. Soluble VEGF receptor-2 was significantly elevated in plasma of patients compared with pediatric controls and decreased with ERT. These results suggest previously unknown abnormalities of fibrinolysis and angiogenesis factors in Fabry disease. We demonstrated the feasibility of identifying treatment-specific alterations in a small number of subjects that point to previously unsuspected disease-related biological abnormalities.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03/2007; 104(8):2873-8. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystem disorder. Enzyme-replacement therapy in adults has limited efficacy in treating major sequelae of advanced Fabry disease, such as kidney failure or stroke. This prompted a study of the safety and efficacy of enzyme replacement at an earlier stage of Fabry disease. Our purpose with this work was to evaluate safety and to explore efficacy of enzyme treatment with agalsidase alfa in pediatric patients with Fabry disease. We conducted a 6-month open-label study at 3 tertiary care centers with 24 children (19 boys and 5 girls) with a mean age of 11.8 (range: 6.5-18) years, to examine safety parameters, including infusion reactions and antiagalsidase alfa antibodies. Agalsidase alfa was well tolerated, and all of the patients completed the study. Six boys and 1 girl had mild-to-moderate infusion reactions. One boy developed transient immunoglobulin G antibodies against agalsidase alfa. The boys showed a significant reduction in plasma globotriaosylceramide on treatment. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate, cardiac structure, and function were normal and did not change over 26 weeks. Heart rate variability, as determined by 2-hour ambulatory monitoring, was decreased in the boys compared with the girls at baseline. All indices of heart rate variability improved significantly in the boys. Three patients with anhidrosis, as determined by quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing, developed sweating. Six of 11 patients could reduce or cease their use of antineuropathic analgesics. Enzyme replacement with agalsidase alfa was safe in this study. The exploratory efficacy analysis documented increased clearance of globotriaosylceramide and improvement of autonomic function. Prospective long-term studies are needed to assess whether enzyme replacement initiated early in patients with Fabry disease is able to prevent major organ failure in adulthood.
    PEDIATRICS 10/2006; 118(3):924-32. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an underdiagnosed, treatable, X-linked, multisystem disorder. To test the hypothesis that quality of life and sweating are decreased among pediatric patients with Fabry disease, compared with control subjects, and to provide quantitative natural history data and novel clinical end points for therapeutic trials. Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Referral to the National Institutes of Health. Twenty-five male children with Fabry disease (mean age: 12.3 +/- 3.5 years) and 21 age-matched control subjects. Quality of life (measured with the Child Health Questionnaire) and sweating (assessed with the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test). Quality of life scores for pediatric patients <10 years of age with Fabry disease, compared with published normative values, were 55 +/- 17 vs 83 +/- 19 for bodily pain and 62 +/- 19 vs 80 +/- 13 for mental health. Bodily pain scores for patients > or =10 years of age were 54 +/- 22 vs 74 +/- 23. Sweat volume in the Fabry disease group was 0.41 +/- 0.46 microL/mm2, compared with 0.65 +/- 0.44 microL/mm2 in the control group. Renal function, urinary protein excretion, and cardiac function and structure were normal for the majority of patients. The 3 patients with residual alpha-galactosidase A activity > or =1.5% of normal values were free of cornea verticillata and had normal serum and urinary globotriaosylceramide levels. All other children had glycolipid levels comparable to those of adult patients with Fabry disease. Acroparesthesia and cardiac abnormalities were generally present before anhidrosis and proteinuria. Mapping of the missense mutations on the crystallographic structure of alpha-galactosidase A revealed that the mutations were partially surface-exposed and distal to the active site among individuals with residual enzyme activity. Mutations associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (defined as left ventricular mass index of >51 g/m2.7) were localized near the catalytic site of the enzyme. Despite the absence of major organ dysfunction, Fabry disease demonstrates significant morbidity already in childhood. We have identified important, potentially correctable or preventable, outcome measures for future therapeutic trials. Prevention of complications involving major organs should be the goal for long-term specific therapy.
    PEDIATRICS 03/2005; 115(3):e344-55. · 4.47 Impact Factor