Petra Klemen

Slovenia Medical, Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia

Are you Petra Klemen?

Claim your profile

Publications (13)40.83 Total impact

  • Source
    E Hajdinjak, P Klemen, S Grmec
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Data regarding the value of prehospital measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin T as prognostic indicators of in-hospital mortality are limited. This prospective pilot study aimed to determine the value of a single combined measurement of NT-proBNP and troponin T for predicting in-hospital mortality in patients with acute ischaemic stroke in a prehospital emergency medicine centre. Blood samples were collected in the prehospital setting and analysed for NT-proBNP and troponin T, using a portable device. Parameters previously associated with stroke severity (including prognostic scoring systems) were recorded and assessed as independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. In logistic regression analysis, elevated troponin T (odds ratio [OR] 1.8 [95% CI 1.1, 8.4) and elevated NT-proBNP (OR 5.80 [95% CI 1.3, 22.7]) were significantly associated with poor outcome in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Combined measurement of troponin T plus NT-proBNP was most predictive of survival in stroke patients (93% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 80% negative predictive value, 98% positive predictive value and 92% area under the receiver operating curve). NT-proBNP and troponin T levels, measured during the prehospital phase of care after acute ischaemic stroke, are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality.
    The Journal of international medical research 01/2012; 40(2):768-76. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182.
    Critical care (London, England) 12/2011; 15(6):450. · 4.72 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182.
    Critical care (London, England) 04/2011; 15(2):R114. · 4.72 Impact Factor
  • Source
    grmec-mis@siol.net, Gregor Prosen, Barbara Kit, Matej Strnad, Petra Klemen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is growing evidence that early detection and response to physiological deterioration can improve outcome for patients. Working out-of-hospital, we often find ourselves in diagnostic dilemmas, thus more reliable data could change our actions as well as give better assessment of patient's condition. Therefore, we are always exploring new perspectives that could be transferred from experimental laboratory settings to our primary working area in the field to help us improve decision-making leading to better outcome. In the following sections, we represent our previous studies about the utility of continuous capnometry and the importance of point-of-care ultrasound in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and discuss about the possible future use of transthoracic and transesophageal ultrasound, point-of-care biochemical monitoring, tissue oxygen saturation, pupillometry, and mixed and central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in the prehospital setting.
    SIGNA VITAE (julije.mestrovic@signavitae.com); Vol.5 No.Suppl. 1. 01/2010;
  • Source
    Petra Klemen, Mirjam Golub, Stefek Grmec
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the combination of quantitative capnometry (QC), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and clinical assessment in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary-related acute dyspnea in a pre-hospital setting. This prospective study was performed in the Center for Emergency Medicine Maribor, Slovenia, January 2005-June 2007. Two groups of patients with acute dyspnea apnea were compared: HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 238) vs pulmonary-related acute dyspnea (asthma/COPD) group (n = 203). The primary outcome was the comparison of combination of QC, NT-proBNP, and clinical assessment vs NT-proBNP alone or NT-proBNP in combination with clinical assessment, in differentiating HF-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary-related acute dyspnea (asthma/COPD) in pre-hospital emergency setting, using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The secondary outcomes end points were identification of independent predictors for final diagnosis of acute dyspnea (caused by acute HF or pulmonary diseases), and determination of NT-proBNP levels, as well as capnometry, in the subgroup of patients with a previous history of HF and in the subgroup of patients with a previous history of pulmonary disease. In differentiating between cardiac and respiratory causes of acute dyspnea in pre-hospital emergency setting, NT-proBNP in combination with PetCO2 and clinical assessment (AUROC, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-0.99) was superior to combination of NT-proBNP and clinical assessment (AUROC, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-0.96; P = 0.006) or NT-proBNP alone (AUROC, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.85-0.94; P = 0.005). The values of NT-proBNP> or = 2000 pg/mL and PetCO2 < or = 4 kPa were strong independent predictors for acute HF. In the group of acute HF dyspneic patients, subgroup of patients with previous COPD/asthma had significantly higher PetCO2 (3.8 +/- 1.2 vs 5.8 +/- 1.3 kPa, P = 0.009). In the group of COPD/asthma dyspneic patients, NT-proBNP was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with previous HF (1453.3 +/- 552.3 vs 741.5 +/- 435.5 pg/mL, P = 0.010). In differentiating between cardiac and respiratory causes of acute dyspnea in pre-hospital emergency setting, NT-proBNP in combination with capnometry and clinical assessment was superior to NT-proBNP alone or NT-proBNP in combination with clinical assessment.
    Croatian Medical Journal 04/2009; 50(2):133-42. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prognosis in patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is poor. Higher survival rates have been observed only in patients with ventricular fibrillation who were fortunate enough to have basic and advanced life support initiated soon after cardiac arrest. An ability to predict cardiac arrest outcomes would be useful for resuscitation. Changes in expired end-tidal carbon dioxide levels during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be a useful, noninvasive predictor of successful resuscitation and survival from cardiac arrest, and could help in determining when to cease CPR efforts. This is a prospective, observational study of 737 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patients were intubated and measurements of end-tidal carbon dioxide taken. Data according to the Utstein criteria, demographic information, medical data, and partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) values were collected for each patient in cardiac arrest by the emergency physician. We hypothesized that an end-tidal carbon dioxide level of 1.9 kPa (14.3 mmHg) or more after 20 minutes of standard advanced cardiac life support would predict restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). PetCO2 after 20 minutes of advanced life support averaged 0.92 +/- 0.29 kPa (6.9 +/- 2.2 mmHg) in patients who did not have ROSC and 4.36 +/- 1.11 kPa (32.8 +/- 9.1 mmHg) in those who did (P < 0.001). End-tidal carbon dioxide values of 1.9 kPa (14.3 mmHg) or less discriminated between the 402 patients with ROSC and 335 patients without. When a 20-minute end-tidal carbon dioxide value of 1.9 kPa (14.3 mmHg) or less was used as a screening test to predict ROSC, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were all 100%. End-tidal carbon dioxide levels of more than 1.9 kPa (14.3 mmHg) after 20 minutes may be used to predict ROSC with accuracy. End-tidal carbon dioxide levels should be monitored during CPR and considered a useful prognostic value for determining the outcome of resuscitative efforts and when to cease CPR in the field.
    Critical care (London, England) 10/2008; 12(5):R115. · 4.72 Impact Factor
  • Stefek Grmec, Petra Klemen
    Resuscitation 07/2008; 77(3):417-8; author reply 418. · 4.10 Impact Factor
  • Source
    P Klemen, S Grmec
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The role of pre-hospital trauma care and the effect of pre-hospital rapid sequence intubation (RSI) on patient outcome are still not clear. This study evaluated the impact of pre-hospital trauma care by emergency physicians (EP) on mortality from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a 180-day Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). A 48-month parallel non-controlled cohort study compared a group of 64 patients with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 9; Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15] who received pre-hospital advanced life support (ALS) with RSI and were transported to the hospital by EPs (EP group), with a group of 60 patients who did not receive pre-hospital ALS with RSI [emergency medical technicians (EMT) group]. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in age (P= 0.79), mechanism of injury (P= 0.68), gender (P= 0.82), initial GCS (P= 0.63), initial SaO(2) in the field (P= 0.63), initial systolic blood pressure in the field (P= 0.47) and on-scene time (P= 0.41). In the EP group, there was significantly better first hour survival (97% vs. 79%, P= 0.02), first day survival (90% vs. 72%, P= 0.02), better functional outcome (GOS 4-5: 53% vs. 33%, P < 0.01; GOS 2-3: 8% vs. 20%, P < 0.01) and shortened hospitalization time in intensive care unit (ICU) (P= 0.03) and other departments (P= 0.04). In total hospital mortality, we detected no differences between both groups [EP group: 40% (95% CI: 34-45%) vs. EMT group 42% (95% CI: 36-47%, P= 0.76], except in a subgroup of patients with GCS 6-8 where there was significantly lower total hospital mortality in the EP group (24% vs. 78%, P < 0.01). After starting the trauma care system with emergency physicians in our region, there was a decrease in the number of deaths on hospital admission, a reduction in hospital mortality in the GCS group 6-8, a change in the temporal distribution of deaths, an improvement in functional neurological outcome and shortened hospitalization time.
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 12/2006; 50(10):1250-4. · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Critical Care 01/2005; 9. · 4.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Stefek Grmec, Stefan Mally, Petra Klemen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Q-T interval corrected for heart rate (QTc interval) in predicting outcome and complications in patients with organophosphate (OP) poisoning. This prospective, observational study included 65 patients older than 18 years. In the out-of-hospital setting, the end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), oxygen saturation (SaO2), QTc interval, and GCS score were monitored in each patient. A statistical comparison was then made between the group with respiratory failure and the group without this complication. The group with complications had significantly different values of measured parameters--a longer QTc interval and a lower GCS score, a higher number of intubations, and worse outcomes (p < 0.05). The two measures, GCS score and QTc interval, have been shown to be equally good in predicting respiratory failure and hospital mortality in patients with OP poisoning. In the initial out-of-hospital care of patients with OP poisoning, it is essential to monitor QTc interval and GCS score. These measures help with prognosis, and may suggest when to initiate precautions to prevent complications (i.e., respiratory failure). The simplicity and promptness of these methods allow providers to perform early and effective triage.
    Academic Emergency Medicine 09/2004; 11(9):925-30. · 2.20 Impact Factor
  • S Grmec, P Klemen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We aimed to investigate the utility of end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration as a prognostic indicator of initial outcome of resuscitation, we conducted a prospective study of EtCO2 in adult victims of out-of-hospital non-traumatic cardiac arrest. We prospectively studied 139 adult patients. The initial, final, average, minimal and maximal EtCO2 was significantly higher in resuscitated patients than in non-resuscitated patients. Using an initial, average and final EtCO2 value of 10 mmHg correctly identified 100% of the patients who were subsequently resuscitated with an acceptable specificity (74.1%; 90%; 81.4%). Important observation from this study is that none of the patients with an average, initial and final EtCO2 level of less than 10 mmHg were resuscitated. Data from this prospective clinical trial indicate that initial, average and final EtCO2 monitoring during CPR is correlated with resuscitation. End-tidal CO2 monitoring has potential as a noninvasive indicator of cardiac output during resuscitation and a prognostic indicator for resuscitation.
    European Journal of Emergency Medicine 01/2002; 8(4):263-9. · 1.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IntroductionWe studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. MethodsOur prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. ResultsThe ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. ConclusionsAn ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182.
    Critical Care 15(2):1-9. · 4.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    S Grmec, S Mally, P Klemen
    Critical Care 5:1-1. · 4.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

192 Citations
40.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2012
    • Slovenia Medical
      Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia
  • 2008
    • University of Maribor
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Maribor, Mestna Obcina Maribor, Slovenia
  • 2006
    • University Medical Centre Maribor
      Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia