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Publications (5)0.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Earlier risk assessment for acute coronary insufficiency has been done on the basis of logistic function and multiple regression analysis. Such an approach does not take into account the pathophysiological relationships among risk factors and individual medical data. An alternative approach based on physiological modeling of myocardial oxygen demand and oxygen supply by the coronary circulation is presented. The ratio of the two is termed the adaption ratio. Sensitivity of this ratio to parameter perturbation is the risk for that particular parameter. The sum of the sensitivities for the various risk factors gives the risk index. A clinical study on 40 subjects in the age group 35 to 60 that is underway to assess the validity of the approach is described.< >
    Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1988. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE; 12/1988
  • G.L. Jain, S.K. Guha, J.S. Pasricha
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with loss of the sense of pressure exerted by the hand tend to hold objects with excessive pressure, leading to compression of blood vessels. This, over a period, leads to tissue necrosis due to reduction in blood circulation. To give an indication of excessive gripping pressure so that these patients can prevent hands damage, a double-layered ring has been designed when it is worn by the patient, and indication of excessive pressure is obtained in the form of change in color of a layer of liquid crystal mixture sandwiched between the two layers of the ring.
    Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1988. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE; 01/1988
  • G L Jain, J S Pasricha, S K Guha
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    ABSTRACT: Two new instruments named Pain/Touch Sensation Testing and Grading devices, which provide standardized and graded stimuli of pain and touch, respectively, were employed to grade the sensory loss at the center of 110 lesions in 97 patients. The grades of sensory loss for pain were 0 (no sensory loss) in 8 lesions, 1 in 6 lesions, 2 in 14 lesions, 3 in 26 lesions, 4 in 19 lesions, and 5 (complete loss) in 37 lesions (total 110 lesions). Grades of sensory loss for touch were 0 in 12 lesions, 1 in 3 lesions, 2 in 5 lesions, 3 in 9 lesions, 4 in 15 lesions, and 5 in 22 lesions (total 66 lesions). Reevaluation done after 2-40 weeks in 46 of these lesions revealed that the grade for pain had decreased in 17 lesions, increased in 4, and remained the same in 25. The grade for loss of touch sensation had decreased in 10, increased in 1, and remained the same in 35. Grading of the sensory loss in most of the 1-cm-square areas of the entire lesion, done in 19 patients (26 lesions), revealed that the sensory loss was not uniform all over the lesion and it was also not maximum at the center of the lesion, though generally it was less at the margin in comparison with the central area. Follow up of 11 of these lesions revealed a decrease in the grades in 7 lesions for both pain and touch sensations, while 2 lesions showed a decrease in the grades for touch sensation only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    International Journal of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases 01/1987; 54(4):525-9. · 0.22 Impact Factor
  • G L Jain, J S Pasricha, S K Guha
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    ABSTRACT: An attempt was made to improve the perception of pain and touch sensations at the leprosy lesions. The loss of pain and touch sensations in a lesion was graded using Pain/Touch-Sensation-Testing-and-Grading devices. Application of a solution containing 1 mg of histamine per ml of DMSO, at the affected area decreased the grades of the loss of pain sensation in 11 (31.4%) patients and of touch sensation in 8 (22.8%) patients, out of the 35 patients tested, indicating an improvement in the perception at the lesion. This effect, however, did not persist even for 5 minutes. A higher concentration (2 mg/ml) of histamine produced reduction in the sensory loss in a larger percentage (47% for pain and 35.3% for touch) of patients, though the duration of this effect was still not prolonged.
    Indian journal of leprosy 01/1986; 58(2):225-32.
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    G L Jain, J S Pasricha, S K Guha
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    ABSTRACT: In order to grade the loss of the temperature sensation in the skin of leprosy patients, a newly designed instrument called the Temperature-Sensation-Testing-and-Grading device has been employed to determine the minimum temperature felt as hot (MTH) at the skin area. The MTH in normal subjects was observed to vary from one region of the body to another; it was generally higher on the distal parts of the extremities compared to the proximal parts; and it was also higher on the lower extremities compared to the upper ones. The abdomen and the back generally had the lowest values. There were no variations according to age (11-80 years) or sex and no differences on symmetrical sites of the body. The MTH value, however, showed a dependence on the environmental temperature, the values being lower at low environmental temperatures and higher at high environmental temperatures. But at the same site and the same environmental temperature, the MTH value was found to be almost constant. Different individuals had different MTH values at the same body site and even at the same environmental temperature. The unaffected skin of leprosy patients showed values comparable to the controls. At the leprosy lesions, however, the degree of sensory loss could easily be determined in comparison with the MTH at the contralateral/adjoining unaffected skin. Out of 54 leprosy patients, 7 patients had no sensory loss; in 27 patients the loss varied between 1 degree C and 20 degrees C; while in 20 patients the loss was complete--they could not perceive even 50 degrees C as hot.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    International Journal of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases 07/1985; 53(2):206-10. · 0.22 Impact Factor