S Oh-ishi

Asahikawa Medical University, Asakhigava, Hokkaidō, Japan

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Publications (125)280.5 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Zymosan, the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, induces innate immune responses involving prostanoid production and complement activation. However, the roles of prostanoids in zymosan-induced inflammation and their interaction with the complement system remain to be determined. To clarify these issues, we examined zymosan-induced pleurisy in mice lacking receptors for prostaglandin (PG) E(2) (EP(-/-) mice) or PGI(2) (IP(-/-) mice). Zymosan-induced exudate formation was significantly reduced in IP(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice, whereas none of the EP(-/-) mice (EP(1)(-/-), EP(2)(-/-), EP(3)(-/-), and EP(1)(-/-)(4) mice) showed any significant difference from WT mice. Furthermore, indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostanoid biosynthesis, suppressed exudate formation in WT mice to almost the same level as that of IP(-/-) mice. Accordingly, significant production of PGI(2) in the pleural cavity, suggested to be cyclooxygenase-2-dependent, was observed after zymosan injection. Complement activation in the pleural cavity after zymosan injection was confirmed, and preinjection of cobra venom factor (CVF), to deplete blood complement C3, was significantly suppressed after zymosan-induced exudate formation in WT mice. Simultaneous treatment with indomethacin and CVF further suppressed exudate formation in WT mice compared with each treatment alone. Because, some degree of exudate formation was still observed, other factor(s) seem to be involved. However, platelet-activating factor, a promising candidate as one such factor, was not involved in zymosan-induced exudate formation. These results clearly indicate that the PGI(2)-IP system together with the complement system plays a key role in exudate formation in zymosan-induced pleurisy.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 06/2008; 325(2):601-9. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The roles of prostaglandins (PGs) as mediators of inflammation have been extensively studied, and production of PGI2 and PGE2 at inflammatory sites has been reported. However, it has not yet been clarified which type of PG receptors has a major role in inflammatory exudation. To examine in vivo role of PG receptors in inflammatory exudation, we induced pleurisy in PG receptors (IP, EP1, EP2, EP3, or EP4) knockout mice by intrapleural injection of carrageenin. Pleural exudate accumulation in wild-type (WT) mice at 1 to 5 h, but not at 24 h, was significantly attenuated by the pretreatment with indomethacin, indicating that PGs are responsible for exudate formation at the early phase of pleurisy. Pleural exudation at 1 to 5 h in IP, EP2, or EP3 knockout mice, but not in EP1 and EP4 knockout, was significantly reduced compared with in WT mice. In the exudates, 6-keto-PGF1alpha and PGE2 were detected as the major PGs, each with its peak concentration at 3 h. In addition, involvement of bradykinin in the phenomenon was suggested by the fact that captopril, a kininase inhibitor, enhanced the exudate formation and increased the amount of 6-keto-PGF1alpha and PGE2 and that a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist inhibited the exudate formation. In contrast, leukocyte migration into pleural cavity was not influenced by indomethacin-treatment nor by these receptor deficiencies. These results demonstrate participation of EP2 and EP3 along with IP in pleural exudate formation but not in leukocyte migration in carrageenin-induced mouse pleurisy.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 01/2005; 311(3):1218-24. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the in vivo role of membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES)-1, a terminal enzyme in the PGE2-biosynthetic pathway, using mPGES-1 knockout (KO) mice. Comparison of PGES activity in the membrane fraction of tissues from mPGES-1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice indicated that mPGES-1 accounted for the majority of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible PGES in WT mice. LPS-stimulated production of PGE2, but not other PGs, was impaired markedly in mPGES-1-null macrophages, although a low level of cyclooxygenase-2-dependent PGE2 production still remained. Pain nociception, as assessed by the acetic acid writhing response, was reduced significantly in KO mice relative to WT mice. This phenotype was particularly evident when these mice were primed with LPS, where the stretching behavior and the peritoneal PGE2 level of KO mice were far less than those of WT mice. Formation of inflammatory granulation tissue and attendant angiogenesis in the dorsum induced by subcutaneous implantation of a cotton thread were reduced significantly in KO mice compared with WT mice. Moreover, collagen antibody-induced arthritis, a model for human rheumatoid arthritis, was milder in KO mice than in WT mice. Collectively, our present results provide unequivocal evidence that mPGES-1 contributes to the formation of PGE2 involved in pain hypersensitivity and inflammation.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 09/2004; 279(32):33684-95. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the expression of the prototypic secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), group IIA (sPLA(2)-IIA), is known to be up-regulated during inflammation, it remains uncertain if other sPLA(2) enzymes display similar or distinct profiles of induction under pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated the expression of several sPLA(2)s in rodent inflammation models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice, the expression of sPLA(2)-V, and to a lesser extent that of sPLA(2)-IID, -IIE, and -IIF, were increased, whereas that of sPLA(2)-X was rather constant, in distinct tissues. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse ear edema, in which the expression of sPLA(2)-IID, -IIF and -V was increased, was significantly reduced by YM-26734, a competitive sPLA(2)-IIA inhibitor that turned out to inhibit sPLA(2)-IID, -IIE, -V and -X as well. In contrast, sPLA(2)-IIA was dominant in carageenin-induced pleurisy in rats, where the accumulation of exudate fluids and leukocytes was significantly ameliorated by YM-26734. These results indicate that distinct sPLA(2)s can participate in inflammatory diseases according to tissues, animal species, and types of inflammation.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 12/2003; 1635(1):37-47. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    Akinori Ueno, Sachiko Oh-ishi
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    ABSTRACT: Roles for the kallikrein-kinin system in inflammation have been investigated extensively, and many reviews on this topic have been published during the 50 years since the discovery of bradykinin in 1949. Recent progress in the field has been remarkable with the help of experiments using gene-targetted transgenic or knockout mice, which have added further valuable information in addition to previous results obtained from pharmacological and biochemical studies using purified and isolated components of the system. Furthermore, much knowledge has been accumulated as a result of the development of various bradykinin agonists and antagonists. In this review, we focused on the data obtained from the kininogen-deficient rat, which is a natural mutant, and discuss the results in comparison with those from bradykinin receptor knockout mice. These data have clarified that endogenous bradykinin exerts a most important role in inflammatory exudation along with prostanoids, preferentially to histamine, serotonin, or neuropeptides. In inflammatory pain perception also, bradykinin produced in the local perivascular spaces stimulates polymodal pain receptors in conjunction with co-helpers such as prostanoids, vanilloids, and neuropeptides. These important roles are concluded based on consistent results obtained from experiments using several antagonists of bradykinin, kininogen-deficient rats, and bradykinin receptor knockout mice.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 10/2003; 93(1):1-20. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytosolic prostaglandin (PG) E(2) synthase (cPGES) is constitutively expressed in a wide variety of cells and converts cyclooxygenase (COX)-1-derived PGH(2) to PGE(2). Given the fact that cPGES is identical to p23, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-binding protein, we herein examined the effect of Hsp90 on PGE(2) generation by cPGES. Incubation of cPGES with Hsp90 resulted in a significant increase in PGES activity in vitro. Association of cPGES with Hsp90 was increased in cells stimulated with A23187 or bradykinin, accompanied by concomitant increases in cPGES activity and PGE(2) production. Moreover, treatment of cells with Hsp90 inhibitors, which destabilized the cPGES/Hsp90 complex, reduced cPGES activity and PGE(2) production to basal levels. These results suggest that the regulation of cPGES activity in cells depends on its association with Hsp90 and provide the first line of evidence that eicosanoid biosynthesis is under the control of the molecular chaperone.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 05/2003; 303(4):1018-23. · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Akinori Ueno, Sachiko Oh-ishi
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    ABSTRACT: Searches for chemical mediators of inflammation underlying classical signs of inflammation i.e. heat, redness, swelling, and pain have been performed and various experimental models for evaluation of new agents to manage these inflammatory signs have been developed extensively during the last century. Now, at the beginning of the 21st-century, after great progress in gene technology, the necessity of in vivo animal study is being reconsidered. Therefore, this review introduces and describes findings obtained by the use of various experimental animal models. We have compared the inflammatory characteristics among species using reported animal models such as dye exudation in the skin, paw edema, pleurisy, and writhing reaction; then we have precisely examined mediators involved in these inflammatory reactions. In the process of plasma exudation and pain perception in the earlier phases of acute inflammation, involvement of the kallikrein-kinin system and prostanoids was demonstrated. Precisely, bradykinin, and PGI(2) among the prostanoids, are major mediators for exudation and pain perception of the initial acute phase of inflammation; both mediators collaborate to enhance these effects. PGE(2), perhaps produced by cyclooxygenase-2, was involved in induction of plasma exudation and pain perception in a later phase than the timing of involvement of PGI(2). Precise roles of various prostanoids will hopefully be clarified by the research projects in progress.
    Current Drug Targets - Inflammation & Allergy 01/2003; 1(4):363-76.
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    ABSTRACT: Membrane-associated prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthase (mPGES) is an inducible terminal enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway for prostaglandin E2, which participates in many biological processes. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism controlling the inducible expression of mPGES. The mouse mPGES gene consisted of three exons, and its 5'-proximal promoter contained consensus motifs for the binding of several transcription factors. Transgenic expression in mice of the mouse mPGES promoter flanked by a reporter gene resulted in stimulus-dependent induction of the reporter in tissues where mPGES was intrinsically induced. Deletion and site-specific mutation analyses of the 5'-flanking region demonstrated that stimulus-inducible expression of mouse and human mPGES required tandem GC boxes adjacent to the initiation site. The stimulus-induced GC box binding activity was present in nuclear extracts of cells, in which the proximal GC box was essential for binding. An 80-kDa stimulus-inducible nuclear protein that bound to this GC box was identified as the transcription factor Egr-1 (for early growth response-1). These results suggest that Egr-1 is a key transcription factor in regulating the inducible expression of mPGES.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 09/2002; 277(32):28601-8. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We detected the expression of inducible bradykinin (BK) B1 receptor mRNA in the rat ileum by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, when the isolated ileum was suspended for at least 1 hr in an aerated Tyrode's solution at 37 degrees. The induction of this mRNA was both time- and temperature-dependent, and was followed by a contractile response to des-Arg9-BK at around 3 hr of incubation; this response increased in magnitude with time and was maximal at 6 hr. In contrast, the contraction in response to BK and the expression of B2 receptor mRNA were constant throughout this 6-hr incubation period. The contraction due to des-Arg9-BK was selectively suppressed by B1 receptor antagonists, i.e. des-Arg9[Leu8]-BK and des-Arg10-HOE140, but not by the B2 antagonists D-Arg-[Hyp3,Thi5,8,D-Phe7]-BK and HOE140. The inducible des-Arg9-BK contractile response was suppressed by continuous in vitro exposure of the ileum to cycloheximide or actinomycin D, but neither inhibitor affected the contraction induced by BK, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be induced de novo. In vitro and ex vivo treatment of the ileum with dexamethasone suppressed the induction of the contractile response to des-Arg9-BK, but had no significant effect on the expression of B1 receptor mRNA. Some protein kinase C inhibitors, i.e. H7 and calphostin C, suppressed the expression of B1 receptor mRNA and diminished the contractile response to des-Arg9-BK. These results suggest that the de novo synthesis of the B1 receptor in the ileum preparation can be up-regulated at the transcriptional level (a process in which a specific isoform of protein kinase C may be involved). Additionally, these data suggest that the contractile response to des-Arg9-BK involves a process sensitive to some post-transcriptional action of dexamethasone.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 07/2002; 63(11):2043-53. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the roles of prostaglandin receptors regulating tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and IL-10 production by zymosan-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. During the stimulation with zymosan for 5 h, the presence of PGE2 or carbacyclin suppressed the TNFα production, whereas it increased that of IL-10; and indomethacin caused the reverse effects, suggesting that endogenous prostaglandins may have regulatory effects on the cytokine production. Among the EP subtype-selective synthetic agonists used, EP2 and EP4 agonists caused down-regulation of the TNFα production, but up-regulation of the IL-10 production; whereas EP1 and EP3 agonists showed no effect. Macrophages harvested from IP, EP2 or EP4 receptor-deficient mice lacked the up- and down-regulatory effects on the cytokine production by each corresponding agonist. These effects of prostaglandins agreed well with the mRNA expression of TNFα and IL-10 when mRNA levels were examined by the RT-PCR method. Thus, the results suggest that endogenous PGI2 and PGE2 may exert their anti-inflammatory influence on the cytokine production through IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors.
    International Congress Series 01/2002; 1233:479-484.
  • Y Ikeda, A Ueno, H Naraba, S Oh-ishi
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    ABSTRACT: We found that intraperitoneal injection of organic acids, such as propionic and lactic acid, are able to develop writhing responses in mice similarly as that of acetic acid. These acid-induced writhing reactions were significantly attenuated by capsazepine, a VR1 receptor-specific antagonist, but the phenylbenzoquinone-induced one was not, suggesting that the acids but not phenylbenzoquinone activate the VR1 receptor, which is involved in polymodal pain perception. Hoe 140, a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, also suppressed the acid-induced writhing response. Furthermore, these writhing responses were significantly suppressed after neonatal treatment with capsaicin, which treatment is known to destroy peripheral sensory afferent C-fibers. Capsazepine and Hoe 140 did not further attenuate the already reduced writhing responses of capsaicin-treated mice, suggesting that the acids stimulate the VR1 and the bradykinin B2 receptor in the pathway comprising sensory afferent C-fibers. On the other hand, indomethacin further significantly suppressed the writhing number of the capsaicin-treated animals, suggesting that the acid-induced pain perception requires prostanoid receptors not only in the pathway via capsaicin-sensitive C-fibers but also in other sensory pathways. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of the vanilloid receptor in the acid-induced inflammatory pain perception via sensory C-fibers in addition to the known mediators bradykinin, neurokinins, and prostanoids.
    Life Sciences 12/2001; 69(24):2911-9. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To know the roles of prostaglandin I (IP) and prostaglandin E (EP) receptors in pain perception, we compared the acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice deficient in prostaglandin receptors, i.e. IP, EP(1,) EP(2,) EP(3,) or EP(4,) with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment. Without LPS pretreatment, IP-receptor deficient mice showed a significantly smaller number of responses, as previously reported, whereas mice deficient in any of the EP-receptor subtypes showed a number of writhings similar to those of wild-type mice. When mice were pretreated with LPS for 24 hr to induce cyclooxygenase-2 expression, the wild-type as well as EP(1)-, EP(2)-, or EP(4)-receptor-deficient mice showed a similar enhanced writhing response, whereas IP- and EP(3)-receptor-deficient mice had a significantly less enhanced number of writhings. These results indicate that IP and EP(3) are the major prostaglandin receptors mediating the enhanced acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice pre-exposed to LPS, i.e. in endotoxin-enhanced inflammatory nociception.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 08/2001; 62(2):157-60. · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • Biochemical Pharmacology 07/2001; 62(2). · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To know which receptors of prostaglandins are involved in the regulation of TNFalpha and interleukin 10 (IL-10) production, we examined the production of these cytokines in murine peritoneal macrophages stimulated with zymosan. The presence of PGE(2) or the PGI(2) analog carbacyclin in the medium reduced the TNFalpha production to one-half, whereas IL-10 production increased several fold; and indomethacin caused the reverse effects, suggesting that endogenous prostaglandins may have a regulatory effect on the cytokine production. Among prostaglandin E (EP) receptor-selective synthetic agonists, EP2 and EP4 agonists caused down-regulation of the zymosan-induced TNFalpha production, but up-regulation on the IL-10 production; while EP1 and EP3 agonists showed no effect. Macrophages harvested from prostaglandin I (IP) receptor-deficient mice showed the up- and down-regulatory effects on the cytokine production by the EP2 and EP4 agonists or PGE(2), but no effect was obtained by carbacyclin. On the contrary, macrophages from EP2-deficient mice showed the effect by PGE(2), carbacyclin, and the EP4 agonist, but not by the EP2 agonist; and the cells from EP4-deficient mice showed the effect by PGE(2), carbacyclin, and EP2 agonist, but not by the EP4 agonist. These functional effects of prostaglandins well accorded with the mRNA expression of TNFalpha and IL-10 when such expression was examined by the RT-PCR method. The peritoneal macrophages from normal mice expressed IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors, but not EP1 and EP3, when examined by RT-PCR. Thus the results suggest that PGI(2) and PGE(2) generated simultaneously with cytokines by macrophages treated with zymosan may influence the cytokine production through IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 06/2001; 61(9):1153-60. · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • Y Ikeda, A Ueno, H Naraba, S Oh-ishi
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory pain was induced following an intradermal injection of carrageenin into rat paws, and the hyperalgesia was measured in terms of withdrawal time following thermal pain stimulation of the inflamed paw. This hyperalgesia was significantly less in kininogen-deficient Brown Norway (B/N)-Katholiek rats, which also showed less swelling in carrageenin-induced paw edema, than in normal B/N-Kitasato rats at 1 approximately 4 hr after the carrageenin injection (at the early phase). However, 24 hr after the injection, hyperalgesia and the swelling volume of the kininogen-deficient rats were almost the same as those in normal rats. The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist FR173657, (E)-3-(6-acetamido-3-pyridyl)-N-[N-[2,4-dichloro-3-[(2-methyl-8-quinolinyl)oxymethyl]phenyl]-N-methylaminocarbonylmethyl]acrylamide, attenuated the carrageenin-induced swelling and hyperalgesia of the normal rats at the early phase to almost the levels of the B/N-Katholiek rats. Pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, also inhibited the carrageenin-induced responses significantly in normal rats. These results indicate that bradykinin, acting on the B2 receptor, is the main mediator at the early phase of inflammatory pain of carrageenin edema and that prostaglandins, produced by cyclooxygenase, potentiate the effects of bradykinin.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 05/2001; 61(7):911-4. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To know the roles of prostaglandin I (IP) and prostaglandin E (EP) receptors in pain perception, we compared the acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice deficient in prostaglandin receptors, i.e. IP, EP1, EP2, EP3, or EP4, with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment. Without LPS pretreatment, IP-receptor deficient mice showed a significantly smaller number of responses, as previously reported, whereas mice deficient in any of the EP-receptor subtypes showed a number of writhings similar to those of wild-type mice. When mice were pretreated with LPS for 24 hr to induce cyclooxygenase-2 expression, the wild-type as well as EP1-, EP2-, or EP4-receptor-deficient mice showed a similar enhanced writhing response, whereas IP- and EP3-receptor-deficient mice had a significantly less enhanced number of writhings. These results indicate that IP and EP3 are the major prostaglandin receptors mediating the enhanced acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice pre-exposed to LPS, i.e. in endotoxin-enhanced inflammatory nociception.
    Biochemical Pharmacology - BIOCHEM PHARMACOL. 01/2001; 62(2):157-160.
  • Akinori UENO, Sachiko OH-ISHI
    Folia Pharmacologica Japonica 01/2001; 117(4):255-261.
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    ABSTRACT: Murine neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2A cells and rat brain astrocytes showed a dose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ in response to bradykinin, when assessed by a single cell image analyzing system. The Ca2+ increase in Neuro-2A cells by bradykinin was also examined by a suspension fluorescent assay using fura-2 loading. The Ca2+ increase in both cases was suppressed by a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140, but not by a B1 receptor antagonist, des-Arg-Hoe 140, suggesting that the effect occurred via specific B2 receptor activation. RT-PCR for bradykinin B2 receptor mRNA showed that both Neuro-2A cells and the astrocytes expressed B2 receptor mRNA. Binding of [3H]bradykinin to Neuro-2A cells was assessed, and a specific binding constant of 0.75 nM was determined. Furthermore, the increase in [Ca2+]i by bradykinin could be caused by a release of Ca2+ from storage sites in the endoplasmic reticulum, since thapsigargin and U-73122 attenuated the effect of bradykinin in Neuro-2A as well as in astrocytes. These results indicate that both astrocytes and neuroblastoma Neuro-2A cells stimulated by bradykinin could express a bradykinin B2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ increase leading to signal transduction.
    The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology 11/2000; 84(2):140-5.
  • Article: [COX-2].
    S Oh-ishi
    Tanpakushitsu kakusan koso. Protein, nucleic acid, enzyme 05/2000; 45(6 Suppl):1109-13.
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    ABSTRACT: To prove that prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) is a major prostaglandin involved in bradykinin-induced exudation, we examined carrageenin- or bradykinin-induced paw edema in prostacyclin receptor-deficient mice (IPKO). Paw volume of wild-type mice (IPWT) increased gradually 5-6 hr after the carrageenin injection in a similar manner as in ICR mice, but the swelling in IPKO mice was significantly smaller (about 60% of the IPWT volume). Indomethacin, at 10 mg/kg, suppressed the swelling of the IPWT paw to the level of the non-pretreated IPKO, which was not affected by indomethacin, confirming the previous result that PGI2 is a major prostaglandin involved in the swelling. The paw edema of IPWT and IPKO was significantly attenuated by the nonpeptide bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist FR173657, at 30 mg/kg, to the same level of swelling, indicating kinin involvement. Injection of bradykinin (1.2 nmole) into the paw caused rapid edema, which peaked around 15 min in both mice. However, the edema induced in IPKO was smaller and almost at the same level as that elicited in the indomethacin-treated IPWT, suggesting that edema induced by bradykinin includes the intrinsic effect of PGI2. Concomitant injection of carbacyclin with bradykinin caused enhancement of edema in IPWT mice but not in IPKO mice, indicating that intrinsic PGI2 could cause enhancement of bradykinin- or even carrageenin-induced edema formation. These results clearly demonstrate that bradykinin released by carrageenin may be a key mediator to induce PGI2 formation, and both autacoids work together to induce enhanced inflammatory exudation.
    Life Sciences 03/2000; 66(12):PL155-60. · 2.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
280.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Asahikawa Medical University
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Asakhigava, Hokkaidō, Japan
  • 2003–2004
    • Showa University
      • Division of Health Chemistry
      Shinagawa, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1977–2003
    • Kitasato University
      • • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1988
    • Kyushu University
      • Faculty of Sciences
      Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan