Jelena Vekic

University of Belgrade, Belgrade, SE, Serbia

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Publications (25)51.27 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Aim: We hypothesized that, in stable angina patients, atorvastatin therapy lowers the cathepsin S (CTSS) concentrations, as assessed non-invasively according to a plasma analysis. In addition, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) size and subclasses in the plasma were analysed to establish the association between CTSS and lipoprotein metabolism and determine whether this association is atorvastatin-sensitive.Methods: A total of 43 patients with stable angina received atorvastatin therapy (20mg/day, 10weeks). The plasma CTSS mRNA levels, CTSS protein concentrations and CTSS activity, as well as LDL and HDL size and subclasses, were analysed before and after treatment.Results: Atorvastatin treatment did not change the plasma CTSS mRNA levels, although it lowered the plasma CTSS concentrations and activity. An increased plasma CTSS concentration and activity were found to be associated with more a atherogenic LDL subclass profile (a decreased dominant LDL size and increased percentage of small, dense LDL particles). The atorvastatin-induced CTSS lowering effect was concomitant with an improvement in the LDL subclass profile, and the changes were found to be interrelated. Concomitant, interrelated changes in the CTSS levels and LDL subclass profiles were found in the LDL phenotype B patients only (a dominant LDL diameter of ≤ 25.5nm at the start of the study). In this subgroup, lowering of the plasma CTSS mRNA level also correlated with lowering of the proportion of small, dense LDL particles.Conclusions: Atorvastatin-induced CTSS-lowering and LDL subclass profile improvements in the plasma of LDL B phenotype patients with stable angina are concomitant and interrelated.
    Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis 04/2014; · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context.-Systemic inflammatory diseases are associated with proatherogenic lipoprotein profile, but there is a lack of information regarding overall distributions of lipoprotein subclasses in sarcoidosis. Objective.-To investigate whether patients with sarcoidosis have altered distributions of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Design.-Seventy-seven patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis (29 with acute and 48 with chronic sarcoidosis) treated with corticosteroids and 77 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Low-density lipoprotein and HDL subclasses were determined by gradient gel electrophoresis, while inflammatory markers and lipid parameters were measured by standard laboratory methods. Results.-Compared to controls, patients had fewer LDL I subclasses (P < .001), but more LDL II and III (P < .001) subclasses. This pattern was evident in both acute and chronic disease groups. Patients also had smaller HDL size (P < .001) and higher proportions of HDL 2a (P = .006) and 3a particles (P = .004). Patients with chronic sarcoidosis had smaller LDL size than those with acute disease (P = .02) and higher proportions of HDL 3a subclasses (P = .04) than controls. In acute sarcoidosis, relative proportions of LDL and HDL particles were associated with levels of inflammatory markers, whereas in chronic disease an association with concentrations of serum lipid parameters was found. Conclusions.-The obtained results demonstrate adverse lipoprotein subfraction profile in sarcoidosis with sustained alterations during disease course. Evaluation of LDL and HDL particles may be helpful in identifying patients with higher cardiovascular risk, at least for prolonged corticosteroid therapy due to chronic disease course.
    Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine 12/2013; 137(12):1780-1787. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by profound dyslipidemia and enhanced oxidative stress. The patients also show evidence of exhausted and/or deficient anti-oxidative defense enzymes, one of them being glutathione-S-transferase (GST). This study investigates relationship between GST gene polymorphism and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses in ESRD. GSTM1, T1, and P1 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 160 patients undergoing hemodialysis. LDL and HDL subclasses were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis and biochemical parameters were measured by routine laboratory methods. GSTM1-positive patients had higher proportion of small, dense LDL III particles than those with GSTM1-null genotype (P<0.05). Similarly, GSTP1-Ile/Ile patients had higher proportion of LDL III (P<0.05), but more HDL 2b and less HDL 3a particles than GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val carriers (P<0.05). LDL subclass distribution in smokers with GSTM1-null genotype was shifted towards smaller particles, as compared to GSTM1-positive and GSTM1-null non-smokers. Smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val genotypes had smaller LDL size than their non-smoking counterparts (P<0.05). Both smokers and non-smokers with GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotype had more LDL III particles than non-smokers carrying Val allele. Non-smokers with GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotype had more HDL 2b subclasses than non-smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val (P<0.05), but less HDL 3a particles than smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val genotypes (P<0.05). GSTT1 gene polymorphism had no effect on lipoprotein subclass distributions. Our results demonstrate significant associations between low activity GST genotypes and proatherogenic lipoprotein particles in hemodialysis patients which might further increase their cardiovascular disease risk.
    Clinical biochemistry 11/2013; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A research on novel cardiovascular risk factors is mainly focused on patients with clinically verified coronary artery disease (CAD), while less is known about their presence in symptomatic patients, but without angiographically proven occlusion of coronary arteries. The aim of this study was to compare plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) size and subclasses in stable angina patients with and without significant obstructive CAD. LDL and HDL subclasses were analysed in 100 stable angina patients with ≥50% of obstruction and 40 patients with less than 50% of luminal narrowing, as assessed by coronary angiography. Patients with <50% of obstruction had reduced mean HDL size and higher proportion of small HDL particles (P < 0.05). HDL size and proportion of small HDL particles were significant and independent predictors of obstructive CAD (P < 0.05, respectively). Stable angina patients with <50% of coronary obstruction have more favourable HDL subclasses distribution than patients with significant coronary stenosis.
    Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 09/2013; · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Paraquat (PQ), a widely used herbicide is a well-known free radical producing agent. The mechanistic pathways of PQ neurotoxicity were examined by assessing oxidative/nitrosative stress markers. Focus was on the role of glutathione (GSH) cycle and to examine whether the pre-treatment with enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) could protect the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs) against harmful oxidative effect of PQ. The study was conducted on Wistar rats, randomly divided in five groups: intact-control group, (n = 8) and four experimental groups (n = 24). All tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s.) in one single dose. The following parameters of oxidative status were measured in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 min, 24 h and 7 days post treatment: superoxide anion radical (O₂·⁻), nitrate (NO₃⁻), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total GSH (tGSH) and its oxidized, disulfide form (GSSG) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results obtained from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different, confirming that invasive i.s. route of administration would not influence the reliability of results. Also, similar pattern of changes were observed between ipsi- and contra- lateral side of examined VBRs, indicating rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress. Mortality of the animals (10%), within 24h, along with symptoms of Parkinsonism, after awakening from anesthesia for 2-3 h, were observed in the PQ group, only. Increased levels of O₂·⁻, NO₃⁻ and MDA, increased ratio of GSSG/GSH and considerably high activity of GPx were measured at 30 min after the treatment. Cytotoxic effect of PQ was documented by drastic drop of all measured parameters and extremely high peak of the ratio GSSG/GSH at 24th hrs after the PQ i.s. injection. In the GR+PQ group, markedly low activity of GPx and low content of NO₃⁻ (in striatum and cortex) were measured during whole experiment, while increase value was observed only for O₂·⁻, at 7th days. We concluded that oxidative/nitrosative stress and excitotoxicity are the most important events since the early stage of PQ induced neurotoxicity. Based on the ratio GSSG/GSH, the oxidation of GSH to GSSG is probably dominant way of GHS depletion and main reason for reduced antioxidative defense against PQ harmful oxidative effect. The GR pre-treatment resulted in the absence of Parkinson's disease-like symptoms and mortality of the rats. Additionally, oxidative/nitrosative stress did not developed, as well as almost diminished metabolism of the VBRs at 24th hours (as has been documented in the PQ group) did not occurred in the GR+PQ, suggesting a neuroprotective role for the GR in PQ induced neurotoxicity.
    Chemico-biological interactions 06/2012; 199(2):74-86. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy is associated with alterations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses, but the exact pattern of these variations remains controversial. This study investigates longitudinal changes of plasma LDL and HDL particles distributions during the course of normal pregnancy, as well as associations of maternal LDL and HDL subclasses distributions before delivery with parameters of newborn size. Blood samples were collected from 41 healthy pregnant women throughout entire pregnancy, before delivery and 7 weeks postpartum. LDL and HDL subclasses were determined by gradient gel electrophoresis, while other biochemical parameters were measured by standard laboratory methods. During gestation LDL size significantly decreased (P < 0.001), due to reduction in relative proportion of LDL I (P < 0.01) and increase of LDL II (P < 0.001) and IIIA (P < 0.05) subclasses. In the same time, HDL size and proportions of HDL 2a particles significantly decreased (P < 0.001), with concomitant increase of HDL 3b and 3c subclasses (P < 0.05). Observed alterations were associated with changes in serum triglyceride levels. Rearrangement in LDL subclasses distribution during gestation was transient, while postpartum HDL subclasses distribution remained shifted toward smaller particles. Higher proportion of LDL IVB in maternal plasma before delivery was an independent predictor of smaller birth weights and lengths, while higher proportions of LDL IVB and HDL 2a subclasses were independent determinants of newborns' smaller head circumferences. Routine gestational and prenatal care in otherwise normal pregnancy could be complemented with evaluation of LDL and HDL particles distribution in order to ensure an adequate size of the newborn.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 04/2012; · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal transplant recipients often suffer from dyslipidemia which is one of the principal risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study sought to determine characteristics of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and their associations with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in a group of pediatric renal transplant recipients. We also examined the influence of immunosuppressive therapy on measured LDL and HDL particle characteristics. HDL size and subclass distribution were determined using gradient gel electrophoresis, while concentrations of small, dense LDL (sdLDL)-cholesterol (sdLDL-C) and sdLDL-apolipoprotein B (sdLDL-apoB) using heparin-magnesium precipitation method in 21 renal transplant recipients and 32 controls. Renal transplant recipients had less HDL 2b (P < 0.001), but more HDL 3a (P < 0.01) and 3b (P < 0.001) subclasses. They also had increased sdLDL-C (P < 0.01) and sdLDL-apoB (P < 0.05) levels. The proportion of the HDL 3b subclasses was a significant predictor of increased cIMT (P < 0.05). Patients treated with cyclosporine had significantly higher sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB concentrations (P < 0.05) when compared with those on tacrolimus therapy. Pediatric renal transplant recipients have impaired distribution of HDL and LDL particles. Changes in the proportion of small-sized HDL particles are significantly associated with cIMT. Advanced lipid testing might be useful in evaluating the effects of immunosuppressive therapy.
    Transplant International 08/2011; 24(11):1094-102. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dyslipidemia is commonly seen in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This prospective study investigates whether small-sized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles alone or in combination with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) are independent determinants of ESRD mortality. We performed 36 months follow-up study in 122 haemodialysis (HD) patients. HDL size and subclass distribution were determined by gradient gel electrophoresis. Baseline characteristics of the patients were evaluated for the prediction of mortality. Cox regressions analysis showed that patients with small-sized HDL particles had 2.8-fold higher risk of lethal outcome (P<0.05). Concomitant presence of small-sized HDL particles and increased hsCRP concentration were significantly associated with reduced survival rate (HR=3.907; P<0.05). Observed relationships persisted after adjustment for serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations. Our results indicate that small-sized HDL particles alone and combined with elevated hsCRP concentrations are independent predictors of reduced survival in HD patients.
    Clinical biochemistry 02/2011; 44(8-9):635-41. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rosiglitazone may increase cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Yet, its effects on atherogenic dyslipidemia are still not fully elucidated. In a prospective open-label study rosiglitazone (4 mg/day for 12 weeks) was added to a maximum of 2 oral antidiabetic drugs in 18 diabetic patients. We evaluated the effects on plasma lipids before and after an oral fat load. The size and subclasses of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were also determined (by gradient gel electrophoresis). Rosiglitazone improved glycosylated hemoglobin ([HbA1c] P = .0023), without significant effects on fasting and postprandial plasma lipids. Fasting LDL size increased (+1.4%, P = .034), with less small, dense LDL-IIIA (-25.1%, P = .018). Postprandially, larger HDL-2b reduced (-8.7%, P = .006) and smaller HDL-3b increased (+12.2%, P = .05), without any effects on HDL size. Rosiglitazone led to antiatherogenic changes in LDL size and subclasses, with proatherogenic changes in HDL subclasses, despite no effects on plasma lipids. Their clinical relevance remains to be established.
    Angiology 06/2010; 61(6):584-90. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Atherosclerosis Supplements - ATHEROSCLER SUPPL. 01/2010; 11(2):215-215.
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    ABSTRACT: Small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) and small-sized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are established risk factors for ischemic heart disease. However, their clinical significance for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is uncertain. This study evaluates associations of LDL and HDL particle sizes and subclasses with AIS risk and short-term mortality after AIS. Two hundred AIS patients hospitalised for first-in-a-lifetime stroke and 162 apparently healthy controls were included in the study. LDL and HDL particles were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis and serum lipid parameters were measured by standard laboratory methods. Baseline characteristics of LDL and HDL particles were evaluated for the prediction of AIS and short-term mortality after AIS. AIS patients had significantly more LDL III and IVb, but less LDL I and II particles. They also had significantly smaller HDL size, more HDL 3a, 3b and 3c and less HDL 2b subclasses. The relative content of both sdLDL and small-sized HDL particles was significantly increased in patients (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). In addition, sdLDL was significantly higher in AIS fatalities (n=25) compared with survivors (n=175, P<0.05). Increased sdLDL was a significant predictor of AIS (OR=4.31; P<0.001) and in-hospital mortality after AIS (OR=5.50; P<0.05). The observed relationships persisted after adjustment for conventional risk factors. AIS is associated with adverse distributions of LDL and HDL subclasses. In addition, short-term mortality after AIS is associated with increased sdLDL particles. Our results indicate that sdLDL is an independent predictor of both AIS onset and consecutive short-term mortality.
    Atherosclerosis 11/2009; 210(2):548-54. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Small, dense low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (sdLDL-C) is a recently recognised marker of cardiovascular disease risk. On the other hand, the usefulness of sdLDL-apoB concentration determination in clinical practice offers grounds for further exploration. This study investigates the associations of sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB with serum lipid parameters and LDL size in healthy men and women. The concentrations of sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB were measured after heparin-magnesium precipitation of serum samples from ninety-five asymptomatic subjects (47 men, 30 premenopausal and 18 menopausal women). LDL size was determined by gradient gel electrophoresis and serum lipid and lipoprotein parameters were measured by routine laboratory methods. Compared to premenopausal women, men had higher sdLDL-C (P<0.001) and sdLDL-apoB concentrations (P<0.001). No difference in the sdLDL-C concentration was found between men and menopausal women. Menopause status was associated with higher concentrations of both sdLDL-C (P<0.01) and sdLDL-apoB (P<0.05). Subjects with the LDL B phenotype had elevated sdLDL-C (P<0.01) and sdLDL-apoB concentrations (P<0.001). LDL size and triglycerides were independent determinants of both sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB concentrations. Gender and menopausal status have significant impact on sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB concentrations. The variability in sdLDL-C and sdLDL-apoB levels is considerably influenced by changes in LDL size and triglyceride concentration. Our results suggest that the characterisation of sdLDL particles by evaluating sdLDL-C could be complemented with sdLDL-apoB determination.
    Atherosclerosis 07/2009; 207(2):496-501. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although results from in vitro studies and clinical trials demonstrate strong associations between oxidative stress and cardiovascular risk, to date still no convincing data are available to suggest that treatment with antioxidants might reduce vascular events. Oxidative modifications of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) represent an early stage of atherosclerosis, and small, dense LDL are more susceptible to oxidation than larger, more buoyant particles. Oxidized LDL are independent predictors of subclinical and clinical atherosclerosis. Recent studies suggested that novel therapeutic strategies may take into account the removal of such particles from circulation. Future research is required to explore the potential synergistic impact of markers of oxidative stress and atherogenic dyslipidemia, particularly small dense LDL, on cardiovascular risk.
    Translational Research 06/2009; 153(5):217-23. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oxidative stress and paraoxonase activity play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) study evaluated the prevalence of CVD risk factors and postulated the prediction of future CVD events. We therefore investigated the association between plasma markers of oxidative stress and paraoxonase status with PROCAM risk score. Oxidative stress status parameters [lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), superoxide anion (O(2)(-)), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total sulphydryl group content] and paraoxonase (PON1) status were assessed in 211 participants. The predicted 10-year risk was calculated according to the PROCAM algorithm. As expected subjects with high PROCAM risk score (high CVD risk) had significantly higher concentrations of oxidative stress parameters (TBARS and O(2)(-)P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively). The PON1(192) phenotype distribution among CVD risk groups was not significantly different. Logistic regression analyses revealed significant associations of all the examined oxidative stress status parameters with calculated CVD risk score. The potential of the parameters for CVD risk prediction was tested via multivariate analysis. Only the O(2)(-) level retained a strong association with high CVD risk. Our study demonstrated that high PROCAM risk score is associated with increased oxidative stress, indicating for the first time that elevated O(2)(-) is independently associated with high CVD risk.
    Clinical biochemistry 02/2009; 42(7-8):617-23. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] consists of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)]. Both Lp(a) constituents are well-recognized risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study investigates the interrelationship of apo(a) and LDL size, as well as their possible synergistic effect on the increase of CAD risk. One hundred nine CAD patients and 102 apparently healthy subjects were included in the study. Lp(a) concentration was measured using immunoturbidimetry. The sizes of apo(a) isoforms were determined by SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting. LDL particle size was determined by gradient gel electrophoresis. We found an inverse correlation between apo(a) size and Lp(a) concentration (r(2) = 31%, p <0.001 in the control group and r(2) = 35%, p <0.001 in the CAD group). Individuals with smaller apo(a) isoforms and small, dense LDL (sdLDL) >50% had the highest risk of CAD development (OR = 4.23, p = 0.017). The synergy index (SIM) for the combination of smaller apo(a) isoforms and sdLDL >50% was 1.2. Adjustment for Lp(a) and triacylglycerol concentrations eliminated smaller apo(a)/sdLDL >50% related risk (p = 0.233 and p = 0.09, respectively). Smaller apo(a) isoforms appear to be superior to sdLDL for the assessment of CAD risk. Their combined effect is synergistic.
    Archives of medical research 02/2009; 40(1):29-35. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plasma populations are composed of heterogeneous subfractions that are different in size, density and protein/lipid content. There is increasing evidence that small, dense LDL particles are strongly associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. Similarly, several studies have investigated whether smaller HDL particles are more protective than their larger counterparts and more recent findings suggest that small, dense HDL has significantly higher atheroprotective activity than larger HDL. Yet, certain impairments of the protein/lipid content in small, dense HDL may decrease its antiatherogenic capacity or even induce pro-atherogenic properties. Therefore, it seems that the small, dense phenomenon applies to both LDL and HDL particles. Measurement of LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations has proven clinical utility, while the usefulness of LDL and HDL subclasses determination in clinical practice offers grounds for further exploration. However, LDL and HDL particles characterisation requires either special equipment or a lengthy analytical time and is, therefore, still unsuitable for general clinical use. It remains to be established whether lipoprotein subclasses should be analyzed in routine practice, although their assessment in high-risk subjects could be recommended.
    Clinical laboratory 01/2009; 55(11-12):421-9. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated serum uric acid (UA) is associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Smaller, denser low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are the potential risk factors for CVD, while the role and diagnostic value of inflammatory markers are firmly established. This current cross-sectional study investigates interrelationships between UA, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and fibrinogen concentrations with LDL and HDL sizes in healthy middle-aged subjects. The outcomes-of-interest were smaller, denser LDL and HDL particles (LDL size <or=25.5nm and HDL size <or=8.8nm). Serum UA, hsCRP and plasma fibrinogen concentrations were measured by standard laboratory methods in a sample of 194 healthy volunteers (112 men and 82 women). LDL and HDL particle sizes were determined by gradient gel electrophoresis. The subjects in the highest UA tertile had significantly smaller LDL and HDL particle sizes (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) and higher concentrations of fibrinogen and hsCRP (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Elevated UA (>or=318micromol/L) was a significant predictor of smaller, denser LDL and HDL particles (OR=3.09; P<0.01; n=19 and OR=4.40; P<0.001; n=23, respectively). The observed relationship with smaller HDL size persisted after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. UA strongly correlated with both markers of inflammation. In addition, the higher hsCRP level correlated with smaller LDL size (P<0.05), while fibrinogen concentration was inversely related to HDL size (P<0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that HDL size and inflammatory markers remained independent determinants of UA concentration. In conclusion, higher serum UA and low-grade inflammation are closely linked to alterations in lipoprotein metabolism which may represent an early sign of atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects.
    Atherosclerosis 06/2008; 203(1):236-42. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alterations in plasma lipoprotein subclass distribution affect the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether the determination of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) phenotypes may or may not improve the ability to predict CAD development. Polyacrylamide gradient (3-31%) gel electrophoresis was used to simultaneously determine size and distribution of lipoprotein subclasses in 181 CAD patients and 178 controls. Mean LDL and HDL subclass sizes were significantly smaller in patients than in controls (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that small dense LDL particles were independent CAD risk predictors (OR = 2.867, p < 0.01), even when adjusted for other traditional risk factors, while small HDL particles lost their significance after adjustment (OR = 2.071, p = 0.054). The area under the ROC curve for LDL (0.671) and HDL (0.643) particle size measurement demonstrated low clinical accuracy when compared to the combination of traditional lipid risk factor measurements. CAD is associated with the predominance of smaller LDL and HDL particles. However, simultaneous determination of these two lipoprotein phenotypes provides no additional power in discriminating CAD and non-CAD subjects, beyond that obtained by the traditional risk factors.
    Clinical and Experimental Medicine 06/2008; 8(2):109-16. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the frequencies of apolipoprotein E (apo E) alleles and examined the effect of apo E polymorphism on lipoprotein particle sizes in Serbian healthy, middle-aged individuals. We performed apo E phenotype by immunobloting method in 183 men and 143 women (mean years: 56.3+/-10.60 and 54.9+/-10.31, respectively). Plasma lipid and apolipoprotein levels were measured by routine laboratory methods. LDL and HDL particle sizes were determined by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient (3-31%) gel electrophoresis. The apo E allele frequencies were epsilon2--4.9%, epsilon3--86.5%, and epsilon4--8.6%. Men with epsilon4 allele had lower HDL-C and Apo AI concentrations than epsilon3 men. The epsilon2 allele men had the smallest LDL particles, highest percent of subjects with LDL phenotype B and highest TG/HDL-C ratio. Women with epsilon2 allele had lowest concentration of apo B. The epsilon4 allele women had smallest HDL particles and highest percent of the subjects with small-sized HDL phenotype. This study showed gender-related effect of apo E polymorphism on lipoprotein particle size. In men, possession of the epsilon2 allele is associated with small LDL particles, whereas in women, epsilon4 allele is associated with small HDL particles. Differences in gender-related influence of apo E polymorphism on LDL and HDL particle sizes could be clinically useful in strategy for reduction of coronary disease risk in middle-aged men and women.
    Clinical Biochemistry 05/2008; 41(6):361-7. · 2.45 Impact Factor
  • Anti-Inflammatory & Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (Formerly Cu rrent Medicinal Chemistry - Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Allergy Agents) 01/2008; 7(3):158-165.