Carl Blomqvist

Uppsala University, Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden

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Publications (318)2088.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.
    Nature Genetics 03/2015; DOI:10.1038/ng.3242 · 29.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43,160 cases and 42,600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5,795 cases and 6,624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (OR=0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value=1.58 x 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans approximately 14.5 Kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR=1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value=7.89 x 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR=1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value=2.97 x 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR=1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value=2.77 x 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Human Molecular Genetics 02/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv035 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Although Osteopontin has been known as a marker for cancer progression, the elevated production of this cytokine is not specific for cancer. We have identified the splice variant Osteopontin-c as being absent from healthy tissue but associated with about 75% of breast cancer cases. However, in previous studies of Osteopontin-c, follow-up information was not available.Methods:Here we have analysed 671 patients, comprising a cohort of 291 paraffin blocks plus a population-based case-control study of 380 arrayed breast tumor tissues.Results:We find that high staining intensity of nuclear Osteopontin-c is strongly associated with mortality in patients with early breast cancer. Cytosolic staining for exon 4, reflective of Osteopontin-a and -b also predicts poor outcome. By contrast, total Osteopontin does not correlate with prognosis. These diverse assessments of Osteopontin also do not correlate with each other, suggesting distinct expression patterns for the variant forms. Consistent with its role in tumor progression, not tumor initiation, Osteopontin-c is not correlated with proliferation markers (Ki-67, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin E and cyclin D), neither is it correlated with ER, PR or HER2.Conclusions:The addition of Osteopontin-c immunohistochemistry to standard pathology work-ups may have prognostic benefit in early breast cancer diagnosis.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 27 January 2015; doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.664 www.bjcancer.com.
    British Journal of Cancer 01/2015; 112(4). DOI:10.1038/bjc.2014.664 · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cell division. Therefore inherited CPC variability could influence tumor development. The present candidate gene approach investigates the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding key CPC components and breast cancer risk. Fifteen SNPs in four CPC genes (INCENP AURKB BIRC5 and CDCA8) were genotyped in 88,911 European women from 39 case-control studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Possible associations were investigated in fixed-effects meta-analyses. The synonymous SNP rs1675126 in exon 7 of INCENP was associated with overall breast cancer risk (per A allele OR 0.95 95% CI 1.02-1.10, p=0.0002). Two genotyped SNPs in BIRC5 were associated with familial breast cancer risk (top SNP rs2071214: per G allele OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.21, p=0.002). The data suggest that INCENP in the CPC pathway contributes to ER negative breast cancer susceptibility in the European population. In spite of a modest contribution of CPC inherited variants to the total burden of sporadic and familial breast cancer, their potential as novel targets for breast cancer treatment should be further investigated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Carcinogenesis 01/2015; DOI:10.1093/carcin/bgu326 · 5.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to assess pathogenicity of BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants of uncertain clinical significance. We analyzed large pathology datasets accrued by the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) to reassess histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, and provide robust likelihood ratio (LR) estimates for statistical modeling. Selection criteria for study/center inclusion were estrogen receptor (ER) status or grade data available for invasive breast cancer diagnosed younger than 70 years. The dataset included 4,477 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 2,565 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 47,565 BCAC breast cancer cases. Country-stratified estimates of the likelihood of mutation status by histopathological markers were derived using a Mantel-Haenszel approach. ER-positive phenotype negatively predicted BRCA1 mutation status, irrespective of grade (LRs from 0.08 to 0.90). ER-negative grade 3 histopathology was more predictive of positive BRCA1 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 4.13 (3.70 to 4.62)) versus younger than 50 years (LR = 3.16 (2.96 to 3.37)). For BRCA2, ER-positive grade 3 phenotype modestly predicted positive mutation status irrespective of age (LR = 1.7-fold), whereas ER-negative grade 3 features modestly predicted positive mutation status at 50 years or older (LR = 1.54 (1.27 to 1.88)). Triple-negative tumor status was highly predictive of BRCA1 mutation status for women younger than 50 years (LR = 3.73 (3.43 to 4.05)) and 50 years or older (LR = 4.41 (3.86 to 5.04)), and modestly predictive of positive BRCA2 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 1.79 (1.42 to 2.24)). These results refine likelihood-ratio estimates for predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status by using commonly measured histopathological features. Age at diagnosis is an important variable for most analyses, and grade is more informative than ER status for BRCA2 mutation carrier prediction. The estimates will improve BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant classification and inform patient mutation testing and clinical management.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 12/2014; 16(6):3419. DOI:10.1186/s13058-014-0474-y · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genes sharing similar genomic landscape have the potential to interactively orchestrate certain clinicopathological features of a disease. Deletion of the RAD50 gene is a common event particularly in basal-like breast cancer, and often occurs together with deletions of BRCA1, RB1, TP53, PTEN, and INPP4B. In this study, we investigate whether these co-deleted genes have interactive effects on survival in breast cancer. Using publicly available TCGA data, we employed Cox’s proportional hazards models to test whether genomic deletions of these genes, or reduced protein or transcript levels associate with breast cancer patient survival in an interactive manner. Further validation was obtained at the transcriptional level by including 1,596 additional cases from 13 publicly available gene expression data sets from the KM-plotter database. Our results indicate that RAD50 and INPP4B associate interactively with breast cancer survival at the transcriptional, translational, and genomic levels in the TCGA data set (p (interaction) RAD50 abundance associated with increased hazard, both at the mRNA (HR 2.39, 95 % CI 1.20–4.76) and protein (HR 2.92, 95 % CI 1.42–6.00) levels, whereas concomitant deletion or low expression of both genes associated with unexpectedly improved survival. A similar pattern was observed in the KM-plotter data set (p (interaction) = 0.0067). We find that RAD50 and INPP4B expression levels have a synergistic influence on breast cancer survival, possibly through their effects on treatment response.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2014; 149(2). DOI:10.1007/s10549-014-3241-y · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome wide association studies (GWAs) of breast cancer mortality have identified few potential associations. The concordance between these studies is unclear. In this study, we used a meta-analysis of two prognostic GWAs and a replication cohort to identify the strongest associations and to evaluate the loci suggested in previous studies. We attempt to identify those SNPs which could impact overall survival irrespective of the age of onset. To facilitate the meta-analysis and to refine the association signals, SNPs were imputed using data from the 1000 genomes project. Cox-proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) in 536 patients from the POSH cohort (Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer) and 805 patients from the HEBCS cohort (Helsinki Breast Cancer Study). These hazard ratios were combined using a Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects meta-analysis and a p-value threshold of 5×10-8 was used to determine significance. Replication was performed in 1523 additional patients from the POSH study. Although no SNPs achieved genome wide significance, three SNPs have significant association in the replication cohort and combined p-values less than 5.6×10-6. These SNPs are; rs421379 which is 556 kb upstream of ARRDC3 (HR = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.27-1.75, P = 1.1×10-6), rs12358475 which is between ECHDC3 and PROSER2 (HR = 0.75, CI = 0.67-0.85, P = 1.8×10-6), and rs1728400 which is between LINC00917 and FOXF1. In a genome wide meta-analysis of two independent cohorts from UK and Finland, we identified potential associations at three distinct loci. Phenotypic heterogeneity and relatively small sample sizes may explain the lack of genome wide significant findings. However, the replication at three SNPs in the validation cohort shows promise for future studies in larger cohorts. We did not find strong evidence for concordance between the few associations highlighted by previous GWAs of breast cancer survival and this study.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e101488. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0101488 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and control individuals from 52 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified three independent risk signals: the strongest associations were with 15 correlated variants (iCHAV1), where the minor allele of the best candidate, rs62355902, associated with significantly increased risks of both estrogen-receptor-positive (ER(+): odds ratio [OR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-1.27, ptrend = 5.7 × 10(-44)) and estrogen-receptor-negative (ER(-): OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05-1.15, ptrend = 3.0 × 10(-4)) tumors. After adjustment for rs62355902, we found evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10(-5)]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER(+): OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87-0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10(-4)). Twenty-six percent of the prioritized candidate variants coincided with four putative regulatory elements that interact with the MAP3K1 promoter through chromatin looping and affect MAP3K1 promoter activity. Functional analysis indicated that the cancer risk alleles of four candidates (rs74345699 and rs62355900 [iCHAV1], rs16886397 [iCHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3K1 expression in vivo and might promote breast cancer cell survival. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 12/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.11.009 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer risk factors and clinical outcomes vary by tumour marker expression. However, individual studies often lack the power required to assess these relationships, and large-scale analyses are limited by the need for high throughput, standardized scoring methods. To address these limitations, we assessed whether automated image analysis of immunohistochemically stained tissue microarrays can permit rapid, standardized scoring of tumour markers from multiple studies. Tissue microarray sections prepared in nine studies containing 20 263 cores from 8267 breast cancers stained for two nuclear (oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor), two membranous (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor) and one cytoplasmic (cytokeratin 5/6) marker were scanned as digital images. Automated algorithms were used to score markers in tumour cells using the Ariol system. We compared automated scores against visual reads, and their associations with breast cancer survival. Approximately 65–70% of tissue microarray cores were satisfactory for scoring. Among satisfactory cores, agreement between dichotomous automated and visual scores was highest for oestrogen receptor (Kappa50.76), followed by human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Kappa50.69) and progesterone receptor (Kappa50.67). Automated quantitative scores for these markers were associated with hazard ratios for breast cancer mortality in a dose-response manner. Considering visual scores of epidermal growth factor receptor or cytokeratin 5/6 as the reference, automated scoring achieved excellent negative predictive value (96–98%), but yielded many false positives (positive predictive value530–32%). For all markers, we observed substantial heterogeneity in automated scoring performance across tissue microarrays. Automated analysis is a potentially useful tool for large-scale, quantitative scoring of immunohistochemically stained tissue microarrays available in consortia. However, continued optimization, rigorous marker-specific quality control measures and standardization of tissue microarray designs, staining and scoring protocols is needed to enhance results.
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    ABSTRACT: Background. A large proportion of women with lymph node negative breast cancer treated with systemic adjuvant treatment do not benefit from such therapy since the patient is already cured by local treatment. Several studies have suggested that proliferation markers are strong prognostic factors in early breast cancer. Cyclins are probably the most specific markers of cell proliferation. Previously high expression of cyclin E has been associated with breast cancer recurrence. Materials and methods. In this study we investigate the prognostic value of cyclin E1 in node negative breast cancer patients. In a population-based cohort 186 women who died from breast cancer were defined as cases and 186 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Inclusion criteria were tumour size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no adjuvant chemotherapy. The study was designed to detect an odds ratio of 2.5 with a power of 90% and significance level of 0.05. Cyclin E1 was determined with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarray (TMA). Results. High expression of cyclin E1 was significantly associated with breast cancer death, in both uni- and multivariate analyses with odds ratios (OR) 2.3 [univariate, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–3.6] and 2.1 (multivariate, 95% CI 1.2–3.5). Discussion. Cyclin E1 is a strong prognostic factor for breast cancer death in a population-based and node negative patient cohort and can identify high-risk patients in this group.
    Acta Oncologica 10/2014; DOI:10.3109/0284186X.2014.965274 · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is known to be caused by loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, CHEK2, and other genes involved in DNA repair. However, most families severely affected by breast cancer do not harbor mutations in any of these genes. In Finland, founder mutations have been observed in each of these genes, suggesting that the Finnish population may be an excellent resource for the identification of other such genes. To this end, we carried out exome sequencing of constitutional genomic DNA from 24 breast cancer patients from 11 Finnish breast cancer families. From all rare damaging variants, 22 variants in 21 DNA repair genes were genotyped in 3,166 breast cancer patients, 569 ovarian cancer patients, and 2,090 controls, all from the Helsinki or Tampere regions of Finland. In Fanconi anemia complementation gene M (FANCM), nonsense mutation c.5101C>T (p.Q1701X) was significantly more frequent among breast cancer patients than among controls [odds ratio (OR) = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.26-2.75; P = 0.0018], with particular enrichment among patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC; OR = 3.56, 95% CI = 1.81-6.98, P = 0.0002). In the Helsinki and Tampere regions, respectively, carrier frequencies of FANCM p.Q1701X were 2.9% and 4.0% of breast cancer patients, 5.6% and 6.6% of TNBC patients, 2.2% of ovarian cancer patients (from Helsinki), and 1.4% and 2.5% of controls. These findings identify FANCM as a breast cancer susceptibility gene, mutations in which confer a particularly strong predisposition for TNBC.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2014; 111(42). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1407909111 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology.
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    ABSTRACT: GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology.
    Nature Communications 09/2014; · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46,450 breast cancer cases and 42,600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions, 501 typed and 1,232 imputed SNPs were included in logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry principal components. The SNPs retained in the final model were investigated further in data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising in total 10,052 case and 12,575 control subjects. The most significant association signal observed in European subjects was for the imputed intronic SNP rs1830298 in ALS2CR12 (telomeric to CASP8), with per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR (95% CI)] for the minor allele of 1.05 (1.03-1.07), p=1x10(-5). Three additional independent signals from intronic SNPs were identified, in CASP8 (rs36043647), ALS2CR11 (rs59278883) and CFLAR (rs7558475). The association with rs1830298 was replicated in the imputed results from the combined GWAS (p=3 x10(-6)), yielding a combined OR (95% CI) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08), p=1x10(-9). Analyses of gene expression associations in peripheral blood and normal breast tissue indicate that CASP8 might be the target gene, suggesting a mechanism involving apoptosis.
    Human Molecular Genetics 08/2014; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddu431 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    Human Molecular Genetics 08/2014; · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 x 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.
    Nature 07/2014; 514(7520):92-7. DOI:10.1038/nature13545 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background We have shown that most patients with seminomas have elevated serum concentrations of the free β subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCGβ) and that in nonseminomatous testicular cancer, most of the hCG in the serum is hyperglycosylated (hCG-h). However, the tissue expression of hCG-h or hCGβ in germ cell tumors (GCTs) has not been reported. Our objective was to study the expression and diagnostic value of hCG-h and hCGβ in testicular GCTs. Methods We studied the immunohistochemical expression of hCG, hCG-h, hCGβ, and the free α subunit of hCG (hCGα) in GCTs from 154 patients. We compared the tissue expression with serum concentrations and evaluated the correlation between staining intensity, established prognostic variables, and outcome. Results The expression varied between tumor types. All forms of hCG, including hCG-h, were detected in embryonal carcinomas (22%) and mixed GCTs (48%). Polyclonal hCG and monoclonal hCGβ antibodies detected immunoreactivity in some seminomas (7%). No form of hCG was found in spermatocytic seminomas, pure teratomas, or a yolk sac tumor. The serum concentrations correlated with the corresponding tumor expression. The staining intensities of hCG, hCGβ, hCG-h, and hCGα correlated with disease stage but not significantly with relapse, disease-related mortality, or progression-free survival. Conclusion Trophoblastic tissue expresses hCG, hCG-h, and free subunits together whereas seminoma tissue occasionally expresses hCGβ. This difference might aid in differential diagnosis of some difficult-to-classify cases.
    Urologic Oncology 07/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.urolonc.2013.11.007 · 3.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46,450 cases and 42,600 controls) and analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 (rs1053338, per-allele OR=1.07, 95%CI=1.04-1.10, P=2.9x10(-6)), AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR=1.05, 95%CI=1.03-1.07, P=1.7x10(-6)) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR=1.10, 95%CI=1.07-1.12, P=5.1x10(-17)). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine GWAS: for ATXN7-K264R, OR=1.07 (95%CI=1.05-1.10, P=1.0x10(-8)); for AKAP9-M463I, OR=1.05 (95%CI=1.04-1.07, P=2.0x10(-10)). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known genome-wide association study (GWAS) hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act.
    Human Molecular Genetics 06/2014; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddu311 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2,156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n=39,067 cases; n=42,106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 (rs17550038: odds ratio (OR)=1.24, 95% CI 1.16-1.33, p=4.2x10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR=1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.11, p=8.7x10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, p=7.9x10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high grade breast cancer risk (p=2.1x10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer.
    Human Molecular Genetics 06/2014; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddu300 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age <=50 years.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 05/2014; 16(3):R51. DOI:10.1186/bcr3662 · 5.88 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

11k Citations
2,088.02 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2015
    • Uppsala University
      • Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
  • 1983–2015
    • Helsinki University Central Hospital
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      • • Division of Plastic Surgery
      • • Department of Clinical Chemistry
      Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland
  • 2013
    • Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas
      • Human Cancer Genetics Programme
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Herlev Hospital
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
    • University of Queensland 
      • School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • 2011–2013
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Health Science Research
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
    • University of Southern California
      • Department of Preventive Medicine
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      Maryland, United States
  • 1983–2013
    • University of Helsinki
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Department of Psychology
      • • Department of Medical Genetics
      • • Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology
      Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland
  • 2009–2012
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1999–2009
    • Uppsala University Hospital
      • Department of Oncology
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
    • Lund University
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 2007
    • The University of Sheffield
      Sheffield, England, United Kingdom
  • 1993–2000
    • University of Tampere
      • Laboratory of Cancer Genetics
      Tampere, Western Finland, Finland
  • 1992
    • University of Oulu
      Uleoborg, Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland