Ling Cen

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Jacksonville, FL, United States

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Publications (16)74.87 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Temozolomide (TMZ) is important chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but the optimal dosing schedule is unclear.Methods The efficacies of different clinically relevant dosing regimens were compared in a panel of 7 primary GBM xenografts in an intracranial therapy evaluation model.ResultsProtracted TMZ therapy (TMZ daily M-F, 3 wk every 4) provided superior survival to a placebo-treated group in 1 of 4 O6-DNA methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter hypermethylated lines (GBM12) and none of the 3 MGMT unmethylated lines, while standard therapy (TMZ daily M-F, 1 wk every 4) provided superior survival to the placebo-treated group in 2 of 3 MGMT unmethylated lines (GBM14 and GBM43) and none of the methylated lines. In comparing GBM12, GBM14, and GBM43 intracranial specimens, both GBM14 and GBM43 mice treated with protracted TMZ had a significant elevation in MGMT levels compared with placebo. Similarly, high MGMT was found in a second model of acquired TMZ resistance in GBM14 flank xenografts, and resistance was reversed in vitro by treatment with the MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine, demonstrating a mechanistic link between MGMT overexpression and TMZ resistance in this line. Additionally, in an analysis of gene expression data, comparison of parental and TMZ-resistant GBM14 demonstrated enrichment of functional ontologies for cell cycle control within the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints.Conclusions Across the 7 tumor models studied, there was no consistent difference between protracted and standard TMZ regimens. The efficacy of protracted TMZ regimens may be limited in a subset of MGMT unmethylated tumors by induction of MGMT expression.
    Neuro-Oncology 03/2013; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deregulation of the p16(INK4a)-Cdk4/6-Rb pathway is commonly detected in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and is a rational therapeutic target. Here, we characterized the p16(INK4a)-Cdk4/6-Rb pathway in the Mayo panel of GBM xenografts, established from primary tissue samples from patients with GBM, and evaluated their response to PD0332991, a specific inhibitor of Cdk4/6. All GBM xenograft lines evaluated in this study had disruptions in the p16(INK4a)-Cdk4/6-Rb pathway. In vitro evaluation using short-term explant cultures from selected GBM xenograft lines showed that PD0332991 effectively arrested cell cycle in G1-phase and inhibited cell proliferation dose-dependently in lines deleted for CDKN2A/B-p16(INK4a) and either single-copy deletion of CDK4 (GBM22), high-level CDK6 amplification (GBM34), or deletion of CDKN2C/p18(INK4c) (GBM43). In contrast, 2 GBM lines with p16(INK4a) expression and either CDK4 amplification (GBM5) or RB mutation (GBM28) were completely resistant to PD0332991. Additional xenograft lines were screened, and GBM63 was identified to have p16(INK4a) expression and CDK4 amplification. Similar to the results with GBM5, GBM63 was resistant to PD0332991 treatment. In an orthotopic survival model, treatment of GBM6 xenografts (CDKN2A/B-deleted and CDK4 wild-type) with PD0332991 significantly suppressed tumor cell proliferation and prolonged survival. Collectively, these data support the concept that GBM tumors lacking p16(INK4a) expression and with nonamplified CDK4 and wild-type RB status may be more susceptible to Cdk4/6 inhibition using PD0332991.
    Neuro-Oncology 06/2012; 14(7):870-81. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The therapeutic benefit of temozolomide in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is limited by resistance. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of temozolomide resistance in GBM. We developed an in vivo GBM model of temozolomide resistance and used paired parental and temozolomide-resistant tumors to define the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance and the influence of histone deacetylation (HDAC) inhibition. Analysis of paired parental and resistant lines showed upregulation of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression in 3 of the 5 resistant xenografts. While no significant change was detected in MGMT promoter methylation between parental and derivative-resistant samples, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed an association between MGMT upregulation and elevated acetylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9-ac) and decreased dimethylation (H3K9-me2) in GBM12 and GBM14. In contrast, temozolomide resistance development in GBM22 was not linked to MGMT expression, and both parental and resistant lines had low H3K9-ac and high H3K9-me2 within the MGMT promoter. In the GBM12TMZ-resistant line, MGMT reexpression was accompanied by increased recruitment of SP1, C-JUN, NF-κB, and p300 within the MGMT promoter. Interestingly, combined treatment of GBM12 flank xenografts with temozolomide and the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) favored the evolution of temozolomide resistance by MGMT overexpression as compared with treatment with temozolomide alone. This study shows, for the first time, a unique mechanism of temozolomide resistance development driven by chromatin-mediated MGMT upregulation and highlights the potential for epigenetically directed therapies to influence the mechanisms of resistance development in GBM.
    Clinical Cancer Research 06/2012; 18(15):4070-9. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pilocytic astrocytomas (PA) are well-differentiated gliomas having a favorable prognosis when compared with other diffuse or infiltrative astrocytomas. Molecular genetic abnormalities and activation of signaling pathways associated with clinically aggressive PA and histologically anaplastic PA have not been adequately studied. We performed molecular genetic, gene expression, and immunohistochemical studies using three PA subsets, including conventional PA (n = 43), clinically aggressive/recurrent PA (n = 24), and histologically anaplastic PA (n = 25). A clinical diagnosis of NF1 was present in 28% of anaplastic PA. Molecular cytogenetic studies demonstrated heterozygous PTEN/10q and homozygous p16 deletions in 6/19 (32%) and 3/15 (20%) cases of anaplastic PA, respectively, but in neither of the two other groups. BRAF duplication was identified in 33% of sporadic anaplastic PA and 63% of cerebellar examples. BRAF (V600E) mutation was absent in four (of 4) sporadic cases lacking duplication. IDH1(R132H) immunohistochemistry was negative in 16 (of 16) cases. Neither PDGFRA nor EGFR amplifications were present. pERK staining levels were similar among the three PA subsets, but a stepwise increase in cytoplasmic pAKT and to a lesser extent pS6 immunoreactivity was noted by immunohistochemistry in aggressive PA groups. This was particularly true in histologically anaplastic PA when compared with conventional PA (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). In addition, PTEN expression at the mRNA level was decreased in histologically anaplastic PA when compared to the other groups (p = 0.05). In summary, activation of the PI3K/AKT in addition to MAPK/ERK signaling pathways may underlie biological aggressiveness in PA. Specifically, it may mediate the increased proliferative activity observed in histologically anaplastic PA.
    Acta Neuropathologica 03/2011; 121(3):407-20. · 9.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low grade astrocytomas are the most common CNS tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1(NF1) patients. While most are classic pilocytic astrocytomas (PA), some are difficult to classify, and have been termed "low grade astrocytoma subtype indeterminate" (LGSI). Some of these tumors exhibit peculiar morphologies, including plump cytoplasmic processes and macronucleoli. In the current study we performed electron microscopy, followed by gene expression, immunohistochemicai and western blot analyses in an effort to identify biological differences underlying phenotypic variation in NF1-associated low grade astrocytoma. Electron microscopy demonstrated intermediate filaments and frequent Rosenthal fiber material in both PA and LGSI. Dense core granules and/or aligned microtubules were present in the LGSI group (2 of 3 cases) and in the PA group (1 of 10 cases). Analysis of global gene expression data obtained using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus2.0 chips (5 PA, 1 LGSI), and western blot analysis for phospho-S6 (1 LGSI, 2 PA) demonstrated a gene expression profile reflecting "neuronal differentiation" and increased phospho-S6 immunoreactivity consistent with mTOR activation in the LGSI compared with PA. These findings were confirmed by immunohistochemistry for neuronal markers, as well as combined phospho-S6/ phospho-p70S6K immunoreactivity in 4 (of 4) LGSI vs. 5 (of 13) NF1-associated PA (p=0.02), and 13 (of 39) sporadic PA. Phospho-ERK immunoreactivity was uniformly present in PA and LGSI groups, while BRAF duplication was absent by FISH in 8 NF1-associated low grade astrocytomas. In summary, differential expression of neuronal-related genes and increased mTOR activation may underlie phenotypic variations in NF1-associated low grade astrocytomas.
    International journal of clinical and experimental pathology 01/2010; 4(1):43-57. · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is frequently detected in cancer, promoting its emergence as a promising target for cancer treatment. Inhibiting constitutive STAT3 signaling represents a potential therapeutic approach. We used structure-based design to develop a nonpeptide, cell-permeable, small molecule, termed as LLL12, which targets STAT3. LLL12 was found to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation (tyrosine 705) and induce apoptosis as indicated by the increases of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in various breast, pancreatic, and glioblastoma cancer cell lines expressing elevated levels of STAT3 phosphorylation. LLL12 could also inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation induced by interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. The inhibition of STAT3 by LLL12 was confirmed by the inhibition of STAT3 DNA binding activity and STAT3-dependent transcriptional luciferase activity. Downstream targets of STAT3, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and survivin were also downregulated by LLL12 at both protein and messenger RNA levels. LLL12 is a potent inhibitor of cell viability, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations values ranging between 0.16 and 3.09 microM, which are lower than the reported JAK2 inhibitor WP1066 and STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201 in six cancer cell lines expressing elevated levels of STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LLL12 inhibits colony formation and cell migration and works synergistically with doxorubicin and gemcitabine. Furthermore, LLL12 demonstrated a potent inhibitory activity on breast and glioblastoma tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our results indicate that LLL12 may be a potential therapeutic agent for human cancer cells expressing constitutive STAT3 signaling.
    Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.) 01/2010; 12(1):39-50. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Curcumin has numerous anti-carcinogenic properties, but low bioavailability prevents its use in chemotherapeutic applications. One strategy for circumventing this problem has been the creation of synthetic analogues. We tested the efficacy of an analogue known as GO-Y030 in human breast and pancreatic cancer cells. We compared the impact of curcumin and GO-Y030 on the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1, HPAC and BXPC-3. Both compounds reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis, but GO-Y030 was substantially more potent. We also demonstrated that GO-Y030 was capable of interfering with STAT3, a persistently activated transcription factor in many cancer types. GO-Y030 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity whereas comparable dosages of curcumin had little or no effect. These results indicate that GO-Y030 is a potent inhibitor of cell viability and STAT3 activation, and may thus have potential as a therapeutic agent for cancers expressing high levels of activated STAT3.
    International Journal of Oncology 11/2009; 35(4):867-72. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.
    Cancer Cell International 09/2009; 9:24. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Colorectal carcinoma is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed for colorectal carcinoma. Curcumin, the active component and yellow pigment of turmeric, has been reported to have several anti-cancer activities including anti-proliferation, anti-invasion, and anti-angiogenesis. Clinical trials have suggested that curcumin may serve as a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for colorectal cancer. We compared the inhibitory effects of curcumin and novel structural analogues, GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12, in three independent human colorectal cancer cell lines, SW480, HT-29, and HCT116. MTT cell viability assay was used to examine the cell viability/proliferation and western blots were used to determine the level of PARP cleavages. Half-Maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were calculated using Sigma Plot 9.0 software. Curcumin inhibited cell viability in all three of the human colorectal cancer cell lines studied with IC50 values ranging between 10.26 microM and 13.31 microM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 were more potent than curcumin in the inhibition of cell viability in these three human colorectal cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging between 0.51 microM and 4.48 microM. In addition, FLLL-11 and FLLL-12 exhibit low toxicity to WI-38 normal human lung fibroblasts with an IC-50 value greater than 1,000 microM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 are also more potent than curcumin in the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 in all three human colorectal cancer cell lines studied. The results indicate that the three curcumin analogues studied exhibit more potent inhibitory activity than curcumin in human colorectal cancer cells. Thus, they may have translational potential as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents for colorectal carcinoma.
    BMC Cancer 04/2009; 9:99. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Persistent activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling has been linked to oncogenesis and the development of chemotherapy resistance in glioblastoma and other cancers. Inhibition of the STAT3 pathway thus represents an attractive therapeutic approach for cancer. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of a small molecule compound known as LLL-3, which is a structural analogue of the earlier reported STAT3 inhibitor, STA-21, on the cell viability of human glioblastoma cells, U87, U373, and U251 expressing constitutively activated STAT3. We also investigated the inhibitory effects of LLL-3 on U87 glioblastoma cell growth in a mouse tumour model as well as the impact it had on the survival time of the treated mice. We observed that LLL-3 inhibited STAT3-dependent transcriptional and DNA binding activities. LLL-3 also inhibited viability of U87, U373, and U251 glioblastoma cells as well as induced apoptosis of these glioblastoma cell lines as evidenced by increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 cleavages. Furthermore, the U87 glioblastoma tumour-bearing mice treated with LLL-3 exhibited prolonged survival relative to vehicle-treated mice (28.5 vs 16 days) and had smaller intracranial tumours and no evidence of contralateral invasion. These results suggest that LLL-3 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of glioblastoma with constitutive STAT3 activation.
    British Journal of Cancer 02/2009; 100(1):106-12. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19%) bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F) and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC). The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin) and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1) was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.
    Molecular Cancer 11/2008; 7:78. · 5.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma including two major subtypes, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Increasing evidence suggests that oncogenesis of RMS involves multiple stages of signalling protein dysregulation which may include prolonged activation of serine/threonine kinases such as phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK-1) and AKT. To date, whether PDK-1/AKT pathway is activated in RMS is unknown. This study was to examine phosphorylation status of AKT and to evaluate a novel small molecular inhibitor, OSU-03012 targeting PDK-1 in RMS. We examined phosphorylation levels of AKT using ARMS and ERMS tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry staining. Our results showed phospho-AKT(Thr308) level is elevated 42 and 35% in ARMS and ERMS, respectively. Phospho-AKT(Ser473) level is also increased 43% in ARMS and 55% in ERMS. Furthermore, we showed that OSU-03012 inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis in ARMS and ERMS cell lines (RH30, SMS-CTR), which express elevated phospho-AKT levels. Normal cells are much less sensitive to OSU-03012 and in which no detectable apoptosis was observed. This study showed, for the first time, that PDK-1/AKT pathway is activated in RMS and may play an important role in survival of RMS. PDK-1/AKT pathway may be an attractive therapeutic target for cancer intervention in RMS using OSU-03012.
    British Journal of Cancer 10/2007; 97(6):785-91. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric soft-tissue sarcoma, which includes two major subtypes, alveolar and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. The mechanism of its oncogenesis is largely unknown. However, the oncogenic process of rhabdomyosarcoma involves multi-stages of signaling protein dysregulation characterized by prolonged activation of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. To better understand this protein dysregulation, we evaluated the phosphorylation profiles of multiple tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases to identify whether these protein kinases are activated in rhabdomyosarcoma. We applied immunohistochemistry with phospho-specific antibodies to examine phosphorylation levels of selected receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70S6K, and protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes on alveolar and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma tissue microarray slides. Our results showed that the phosphorylation levels of these kinases are elevated in some rhabdomyosarcoma tissues compared to normal tissues. Phosphorylation levels of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases are elevated between 26 and 68% in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and between 24 and 71% in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, respectively, compared to normal tissues. In addition, phosphorylation levels of mTOR and its downstream targets, p70S6K, S6, and 4EBP1, are increased between 50 and 72% in both subtypes of rhabdomyosarcoma. Further, phosphorylation levels of PKCalpha, PKCdelta, PKCtheta, and PKCzeta/lambda are upregulated between 57 and 69% in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and between 43 and 72% in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. This is the first report to create a phosphorylation profile of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases involved in the mTOR and PKC pathways of alveolar and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. These protein kinases may play roles in the development or tumor progression of rhabdomyosarcomas and thus may serve as novel targets for therapeutic intervention.
    Modern Pathology 10/2007; 20(9):936-46. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stat3 has been classified as a proto-oncogene and constitutive Stat3 signaling appears to be involved in oncogenesis of human cancers. However, whether constitutive Stat3 signaling plays a role in the survival and growth of osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, and soft-tissue sarcomas is still unclear. To examine whether Stat3 is activated in osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and other soft-tissue sarcomas we analyzed sarcoma tissue microarray slides and sarcoma cell lines using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, respectively, with a phospho-specific Stat3 antibody. To examine whether the activated Stat3 pathway is important for sarcoma cell growth and survival, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F) and a small molecule inhibitor (termed STA-21) were used to inhibit constitutive Stat3 signaling in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of Stat3 phosphorylation. Cell viability was determined by MTT assays and induction of apoptosis was analyzed by western blotting using antibodies that specifically recognize cleaved caspases-3, 8, and 9. Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in 19% (21/113) of osteosarcoma, 27% (17/64) of rhabdomyosarcoma, and 15% (22/151) of other soft-tissue sarcoma tissues as well as in sarcoma cell lines. Expression of the dominant-negative Stat3 and treatment of STA-21 inhibited cell viability and growth and induced apoptosis through caspases 3, 8 and 9 pathways in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3. This study demonstrates that Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in human rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcomas and soft-tissue sarcomas. Furthermore, the activated Stat3 pathway is important for cell growth and survival of human sarcoma cells.
    BMC Cancer 02/2007; 7:111. · 3.33 Impact Factor
  • Modern Pathology 01/2007; 20(9):936-946. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is frequently detected in cancer, promoting its emergence as a promising target for cancer treatment. Inhibiting constitutive STAT3 sig- naling represents a potential therapeutic approach. We used structure-based design to develop a nonpeptide, cell-permeable, small molecule, termed as LLL12, which targets STAT3. LLL12 was found to inhibit STAT3 phosphor- ylation (tyrosine 705) and induce apoptosis as indicated by the increases of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in various breast, pancreatic, and glioblastoma cancer cell lines expressing elevated levels of STAT3 phosphorylation. LLL12 could also inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation induced by interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. The inhibition of STAT3 by LLL12 was confirmed by the inhibition of STAT3 DNA binding activity and STAT3-dependent transcriptional luciferase activity. Downstream targets of STAT3, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and survivin were also downregulated by LLL12 at both protein and messenger RNA levels. LLL12 is a potent inhibitor of cell viability, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations values ranging between 0.16 and 3.09 μM, which are lower than the reported JAK2 inhibitor WP1066 and STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201 in six cancer cell lines expressing elevated levels of STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LLL12 inhibits colony formation and cell migration and works synergistically with doxorubicin and gemcitabine. Furthermore, LLL12 demonstrated a potent inhibitory activity on breast and glio- blastoma tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our results indicate that LLL12 may be a potential therapeutic agent for human cancer cells expressing constitutive STAT3 signaling.

Publication Stats

264 Citations
74.87 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Jacksonville, FL, United States
  • 2011
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • 2010
    • Tongji Hospital
      Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China
  • 2008–2010
    • Nationwide Children's Hospital
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 2009
    • Tohoku University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan
  • 2007–2009
    • The Ohio State University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Columbus, OH, United States