J Croize

Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, Rhône-Alpes, France

Are you J Croize?

Claim your profile

Publications (108)148.92 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report a case of transfusion-associated bacteremia caused by Psychrobacter arenosus. This psychrotolerant bacterium was previously isolated in 2004 from coastal sea ice and sediments in the Sea of Japan, but not from humans. P. arenosus should be considered a psychrotolerant bacterial species that can cause transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 07/2013; 19(7):1118-20. · 6.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The surveillance of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in France was reinforced after the emergence of the PCR-ribotype 027 epidemic clone in 2006; notification of case clusters or severe cases by healthcare facilities (HCF) became mandatory. The French Public Health Surveillance Institute (InVS) and the C. difficile National Reference Center (NRC) launched a national, prospective, multicentric survey to complete available data, in 2009. The survey had for objectives to assess CDI incidence and to characterize the strains responsible for CDI. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Every month from March to August 2009, HCF notified the total number of new CDI cases, admissions, and patient-days (PD) to the InVS. A subset of participating HCF sent strains, isolated in March 2009 from CDI patients, to the NRC. RESULTS: One hundred and five HCF with acute care wards and 95 with rehabilitation/long-term care (RLTC) wards participated in the 6-month epidemiological study. The incidence of CDI was 2.28 or 1.15 cases per 10,000 PD in acute care (n=1316 cases) or RLTC (n=295 cases), respectively. Seventy-eight HCF participated in the microbiological study. Two hundred and twenty-four (94.9%) of the 236 strains received by the NRC were toxigenic. The five major PCR-ribotypes were 014/020/077 (18.7%), 078/126 (12.1%), 015 (8.5%), 002 (8%), and 005 (4.9%). CONCLUSION: The incidence of CDI in 2009 in France remained lower than in other European countries, suggesting a successful impact of the 2006 recommendations for CDI control.
    Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses 03/2013; · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe a septic loosening of a hip prosthesis in a 71-year-old woman caused by Gardnerella vaginalis. Infection was confirmed by culture and molecular identification of this bacterium. The patient was treated by one-step exchange of prosthesis and antibiotic therapy combining trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and rifampin, with favourable evolution.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 09/2012; · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present three unrelated post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis cases caused by Rhizobium radiobacter, hospitalized in three different hospitals. Early diagnosis was obtained in two cases by bacterial DNA detection in vitreous samples. All patients recovered from infection, but pars plana vitrectomy was needed in two patients due to rapid clinical deterioration.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 01/2012; 50(4):1487-90. · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report two severe cases of infant botulism diagnosed at Grenoble University Hospital, France, respectively in 2006 and 2009. Both cases were characterized by a delay in diagnosis, severe neurological manifestations and extended period of hospitalization in intensive care unit, but a complete recovery. Infant botulism is a rare but life-threatening disease. It primarily affects infants, and the main risk factor is honey ingestion. Diagnosis should be systematically evoked by pediatricians in infants suffering from constipation, fatigue, muscle weakness, difficult feeding and altered cry, but before the onset of generalized flaccid paralysis, so as to administer specific treatment (BabyBIG®, a human derived botulinum antitoxin) at an early stage of the disease when it is most effective. In conclusion, parents should be aware of the role of honey as a source of spores of Clostridium botulinum and therefore infant botulism in the first year of life.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 12/2011; 171(3):589-91. · 1.91 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The usefulness of two quantitative real-time PCR assays (qrt-PCRmip targeting Legionella pneumophila, and qrt-PCR16S targeting all Legionella species) performed on lower respiratory tract (LRT) samples for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in 311 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Rhône-Alpes (France) was evaluated. The Now Legionella urinary antigen test (UAT) from Binax (Portland, ME, USA) was used as a reference test. Samples were divided into two groups. Group A included 255 CAP patients admitted to Chambery hospital in 2005 and 2006. The Now Legionella UAT was positive in 14 patients. Sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive and negative predictive values for both qrt-PCR tests were 63.6, 98.7, 77.7 and 97.4%, respectively. Group B included 56 consecutive legionellosis patients diagnosed during a 4-year period (2003-2006) at the Grenoble University Hospital. The qrt-PCR16S and qrt-PCRmip displayed a sensitivity of 82.14 and 80.4%, respectively. Among the 70 legionellosis cases, L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated in 15; qrt-PCRmip was positive in another 36, suggesting L. pneumophila infection, whereas the Legionella species involved could not be determined in the remaining 19 cases. The Legionella burden in LRT samples at the time of admission was determined in 46 patients using qrt-PCR16S tests, 44 for qrt-PCR mip groups A and B patients. It varied from 1.9 to 8.35 log(10) DNA copies/mL of LRT sample for qrt-PCR16S and from 1.9 to 8.11 log(10) DNA copies/mL of sample for qrt-PCRmip. High bacterial loads in LRT samples at hospital admission were significantly associated with higher Fine classes, the need for hospitalization in an intensive care unit and for prolonged hospitalization.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 07/2009; 16(4):379-84. · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using a semi-automated repetitive DNA sequences-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) for typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. rep-PCR profiles obtained by the DiversiLab system of 84 P. aeruginosa isolates from distinct epidemiological situations were obtained. rep-PCR groupings were in good agreement with the origin of these isolates. Linked rep-PCR profiles were observed for isolates recovered from a same family of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, for the etiological agents of clustered cases of nosocomial infections, and for some isolates recovered from a same hospital room. rep-PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis SpeI restricted genomic DNA (PFGE-SpeI) profiles were compared. In a few instances, rep-PCR revealed genetic divergences among isolates of a same group of PFGE-SpeI profiles. These divergences could reflect genetic drifts among closely related isolates, as illustrated by those observed between clinical and environmental isolates of a same group of PFGE-SpeI profiles. The interpretation of such differences will require further studies, but the rep-PCR analysis of P. aeruginosa diversity appeared to be an appropriate method to investigate infra-specific genetic relatedness.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 06/2009; 28(9):1105-11. · 3.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acinetobacter baumannii isolate KAR was uncommonly more resistant to cefepime and cefpirome than to ceftazidime and cefotaxime. Cloning and expression of the beta-lactamase gene content of this isolate into Escherichia coli TOP10 identified ss-lactamase RTG-4 (or CARB-10), which corresponds to the first reported extended-spectrum CARB-type enzyme. RTG-4 is a plasmid-encoded Ambler class A beta-lactamase whose sequence differs by 4 amino acid substitutions from the narrow-spectrum beta-lactamase RTG-3. RTG-4 hydrolyzes cefepime and cefpirome and weakly hydrolyzes ceftazidime due to the single Ser-to-Thr substitution at Ambler position 69. RTG-4 is less susceptible to inhibition by tazobactam and sulbactam than RTG-3. Expression of beta-lactamase RTG-4 in a wild-type A. baumannii reference strain showed that it conferred resistance to cefepime and cefpirome. The genetic environment of the bla(RTG-4) gene was made of a peculiar transposon located on a ca. 50-kb plasmid. ISAba9, located upstream of bla(RTG-4), may be responsible for its acquisition by recognizing a secondary right inverted repeat sequence, thus acting by a one-ended transposition process.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 05/2009; 53(7):3010-6. · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Two clonally related Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, A1 and A2, were obtained from the same patient. Isolate A2, selected after an imipenem-containing treatment, showed reduced susceptibility to carbapenems. This resistance pattern was related to insertion of the ISAba1 element upstream of the naturally occurring bla(OXA-66) carbapenemase gene as demonstrated by sequencing, reverse transcription-PCR analysis, and inactivation of the bla(OXA-66) gene.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 04/2009; 53(6):2657-9. · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the context of reducing endoscopy-related infectious risk and new national guidelines on microbiological samples from bronchoscopy, the results of a surveillance program set up in a hospital center were analyzed. Over 4 years, scheduled samples were taken from disinfected bronchoscopes. Bacteriology and mycology tests were used to search for microorganisms. The results were interpreted as falling within three levels: target, alert, and action. Factors that could explain the contamination were studied: age of the bronchoscope, number of uses per year, brand, and model. Out of 96 scheduled samples taken, the compliance rate for the period was 83% and increased (p=0.06) over the 4 years. We identified 15 Pseudomonas (six aeruginosa and nine other species), one Stenotrophomonas, one enterobacterium, and two filamentous fungi. None of the factors studied had a significant effect on sample contamination. The microbiological surveillance of bronchoscopes is an indispensable part of the quality assurance of bronchoscope maintenance. It can lead to maintenance of the bronchoscope when a noncompliant result is found.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 04/2009; 26(3):283-90. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction In the context of reducing endoscopy-related infectious risk and new national guidelines on microbiological samples from bronchoscopy, the results of a surveillance program set up in a hospital center were analyzed. Methods Over 4 years, scheduled samples were taken from disinfected bronchoscopes. Bacteriology and mycology tests were used to search for microorganisms. The results were interpreted as falling within three levels: target, alert, and action. Factors that could explain the contamination were studied: age of the bronchoscope, number of uses per year, brand, and model. Results Out of 96 scheduled samples taken, the compliance rate for the period was 83% and increased (p=0.06) over the 4 years. We identified 15 Pseudomonas (six aeruginosa and nine other species), one Stenotrophomonas, one enterobacterium, and two filamentous fungi. None of the factors studied had a significant effect on sample contamination. Conclusion The microbiological surveillance of bronchoscopes is an indispensable part of the quality assurance of bronchoscope maintenance. It can lead to maintenance of the bronchoscope when a noncompliant result is found.
    Revue Des Maladies Respiratoires - REV MAL RESPIR. 01/2009; 26(3):283-290.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Analyze the microbiological quality of reconstituted milk formulas and the surface hygiene in a hospital infant formula room, in the context of a worldwide emergence of Enterobacter sakazakii infections. Over 3.5 years, monthly samples of reconstituted milk formulas as well as quarterly infant formula room surface samples were taken for bacteriological analysis. Of the 156 formulas analyzed, 54 carried microorganisms but no pathogenic bacteria. The presence of Bacillus species was found in 54% of the formulas for premature infants and in 19% of the other formulas (significant difference). Bacteria, probably brought by operators during reconstitution of the powdered formulas, were found in four of 156 samples (two negative-coagulase staphylococcus, one alpha-hemolytic streptococcus, and one Clostridium bifermentans). Surfaces were studied using 117 samples divided into 11 series: 4.3% of the points carried pathogenic bacteria (Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bulhkholderia cepacia, Staphylococcus aureus). The presence of Bacillus species should be analyzed thoroughly so as to differentiate Bacillus cereus from other nonpathogenic species. The microbiological analysis techniques used for reconstituted infant formulas can be simplified. The quality of the infant formulas seems satisfactory. Hygiene practices provide good microbiological quality in reconstituted infant milk formulas. Microbiological monitoring of these preparations and the infant formula room surfaces is an important aspect of the quality assurance policy, which makes it possible to take corrective measures when an unsatisfactory result is found.
    Pathologie Biologie 08/2008; 56(5):272-8. · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • S Ducki, J Croizé, M-R Mallaret
    Gastroentérologie Clinique et Biologique 07/2008; 32(8-9):784-6. · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • S. Ducki, J. Croizé, M.-R. Mallaret
    Gastroenterologie Clinique Et Biologique - GASTROEN CLIN BIOL. 01/2008; 32(8):784-786.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The microbiological study identifies the bacterial spectrum after surgery, in acute, delayed-onset, or chronic endophthalmitis. DNA amplification of eubacterium-specific sequences in DNA extracted from ocular samples is a new tool for the etiological diagnosis of endophthalmitis. The most successful way to identify bacteria in endophthalmitis is the association of conventional cultures and panbacterial PCR on vitreous samples. Both techniques are complementary. The efficacy of these new molecular techniques should modify our future therapeutic strategies.
    Journal francais d'ophtalmologie 01/2008; 30(10):1049-59. · 0.51 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Analyze the microbiological quality of reconstituted milk formulas and the surface hygiene in a hospital infant formula room, in the context of a worldwide emergence of Enterobacter sakazakii infections.
    Pathologie Biologie - PATHOL BIOL. 01/2008; 56(5):272-278.
  • Journal Francais D Ophtalmologie - J FR OPHTALMOL. 01/2008; 31:196-196.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report a case of severe pneumonia due to Chryseobacterium indologenes in an immunocompetent patient. Chryseobacterium indologenes (formerly Flavobacterium indologenes) are saprophytic Gram-negative rods widely distributed in damp environment. Many sites of infection were described in the literature. These infections are always severe sometimes associated to multiple organ failure. The evolution is usually favorable with antibiotic treatment. Bacteria characteristically grow as yellow-pigmented colonies. They are naturally resistant to many antimicrobial agents. They are usually susceptible to piperacillin(DCI) alone or combined with tazobactam(DCI), ceftazidime(DCI), cefepime(DCI), fluoroquinolones(DCI), rifampin(DCI) and cotrimoxazole(DCI), but the in vitro susceptibility to these antibiotics should be systematically tested. Nevertheless, the optimum antibiotic treatment for Chryseobacterium-related infections remains to be established. In the case we report, the diagnosis was made according to the results of bronchial sample bacterial culture. This case report underlines the need for specific management of patients infected with this species.
    Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses 12/2007; 37(11):762-4. · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pneumococcal cellulitis is an uncommon infection. Head, neck, and trunk are usually affected in patients with hematological malignancies and lupus erythematosus. Limb cellulitis is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus, drug abusers, or alcoholics. Patients present with septic shock most of the time. Surgical treatment is necessary in 50% of the cases. The outcome is usually favorable. We describe the case of a 72-year-old alcoholic patient with diabetes mellitus presenting with cellulitis and septic shock. Serotype 19 Streptococcus pneumoniae with abnormal susceptibility to penicillin (MIC: 0.75 mg/l) was isolated from cellulitis and in blood culture. The evolution was favorable after itavenous antibiotherapy combining ceftriaxone(DCI) (2 g/j), metronidazole(DCI) (1 g/j), and ciprofloxacin(DCI).
    Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses 06/2007; 37(5):290-2. · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study reports an investigation of outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and colonization involving 17 newborns in the neonatal unit of a teaching hospital. A neonatal specialist colonized with MRSA that eventually became mupirocin-resistant was implicated as a recurrent source of transmission of MRSA to newborns.
    Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 06/2007; 28(5):625-8. · 4.02 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

323 Citations
148.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
      Villeurbanne, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 1982–2011
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Centre Hospitalier Régional et Universitaire de Besançon
      Becoinson, Franche-Comté, France
  • 2007
    • University of Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2001–2003
    • CHU de Lyon - Hôpital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical Pierre Wertheimer
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 1992
    • Laboratoire d'Informatique de Grenoble
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France