Katherine Wesseling-Perry

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States

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Publications (30)132.5 Total impact

  • Katherine Wesseling-Perry
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    ABSTRACT: This Commentary highlights the article by Andersen et al, which describes structural changes in bone associated with increased bone resorption in osteoporotic post-menopausal women.
    American Journal Of Pathology 02/2014; · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Habitual short sleep duration appears to increase the risk of obesity. The objective of this paper is to investigate the association of habitual sleep duration with objective measures of energy balance. One hundred twelve African-American and 111 non-Hispanic whites aged 21-69 y participated in a cross-sectional study of dietary assessment and biomarkers. Participants reported the mean number of hours per day spent sleeping over the past year. Short sleep duration was defined as ≤6 h/d of sleep. Energy intake (kilocalories) was objectively assessed using the 2-point doubly labeled water technique to determine total energy expenditure, which is approximately equal to energy intake. Physical activity energy expenditure (kilocalories) was estimated as total energy expenditure minus each participant's calculated basal metabolic rate and the thermogenic effect of food. Compared with participants who slept ≤6 h, individuals who slept 8 h were significantly less likely to be obese (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.79). However, this association was not linear across 6-9 h of sleep (P-trend = 0.16). There was an inverse association between sleep and energy intake (P-trend = 0.07): compared with ≤6 h/d, adults who reported ≥9 h sleep consumed 178 fewer kcal/d. There was also an inverse association between sleep and physical activity (P-trend = 0.05): compared with ≤6 h/d of sleep, adults who reported 9 h of usual sleep expended 113 fewer kcal/d in physical activity. These data indicate that, compared with longer sleep duration, adults who report habitual short sleep duration have somewhat higher physical activity energy expenditure but considerably higher energy intake. Habitual short sleep duration appears to be 1 of the facets of modern life leading to a mismatch between energy intake and physical activity.
    Journal of Nutrition 02/2014; · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and elevated values have been associated with both heart disease and mortality. Recent studies show that FGF23, a protein synthesized by osteocytes, is also present in calcified atherosclerotic plaques and may be induced by heart disease. Whether vascular expression of FGF23 is associated with progressive CKD, however, remains unknown. Therefore, the relationship between kidney function, vascular calcification and FGF23 expression was evaluated in patients with heart disease. Immunohistochemistry for FGF23 was performed in coronary arteries of all patients undergoing heart transplantation at UCLA between February 2008 and 2010. Immunohistochemical staining for Klotho, DMP1, FGFR1, and FGFR3; calcium deposition; and RNA expression of Klotho and DMP1 were assessed in a subset of eight samples. FGF23 was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56% of the coronary artery specimens. Vascular FGF23 expression correlated with declining kidney function, as evidenced by reduced creatinine clearance. FGFR1 and FGFR3 were detected throughout the vascular tissue and in calcified plaques. Calcium deposition, Klotho expression and DMP1 expression correlated with FGF23 immunoreactivity. The findings suggest that the Klotho-FGF23-FGFR system is active in coronary arteries and its upregulation correlates with impaired renal function and matrix calcium deposition.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 01/2014; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In children with CKD, information is limited regarding the prevalence and determinants of fibroblast growth factor 23 excess and 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D deficiency across the spectrum of predialysis CKD. This study characterized circulating concentrations of fibroblast growth factor 23 and 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D, and investigated their interrelationships and associations with GFR and secondary hyperparathyroidism in children with CKD who were enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children observational cohort study. Plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 concentrations and determinants of mineral metabolism were measured in 464 children ages 1-16 years with predialysis CKD. GFR was measured by plasma disappearance of iohexol in 70% of participants and estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children estimating equation using serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations in the remainder of the participants. Participants were grouped according to CKD stage and by 10-ml/min categories of GFR. Median GFR for the cohort was 45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (interquartile range=33-57; range=15-109). Plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 concentration was above the normal range in 67% of participants (with higher levels observed among participants with lower GFR) before higher levels of serum parathyroid hormone and phosphorus were observed. Plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 levels were 34% higher in participants with glomerular disease than in participants with nonglomerular disease, despite similar GFR. Serum phosphorus levels, adjusted for age, were significantly lower at GFR of 60-69 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) than higher GFR, but thereafter they became higher in parallel with fibroblast growth factor 23 as GFR declined. Serum 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D concentrations were lower in those participants with low GFR values, high fibroblast growth factor 23 levels, 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency, and proteinuria. Secondary hyperparathyroidism was present in 55% of participants with GFR<50 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). In children with predialysis CKD, high plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 is the earliest detectable abnormality in mineral metabolism, and levels are highest in glomerular diseases.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 12/2013; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The antibacterial protein hepcidin regulates the absorption, tissue distribution, and extracellular concentration of iron by suppressing ferroportin-mediated export of cellular iron. In CKD, elevated hepcidin and vitamin D deficiency are associated with anemia. Therefore, we explored a possible role for vitamin D in iron homeostasis. Treatment of cultured hepatocytes or monocytes with prohormone 25-hydroxyvitamin D or active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D decreased expression of hepcidin mRNA by 0.5-fold, contrasting the stimulatory effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D on related antibacterial proteins such as cathelicidin. Promoter-reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicated that direct transcriptional suppression of hepcidin gene (HAMP) expression mediated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D binding to the vitamin D receptor caused the decrease in hepcidin mRNA levels. Suppression of HAMP expression was associated with a concomitant increase in expression of the cellular target for hepcidin, ferroportin protein, and decreased expression of the intracellular iron marker ferritin. In a pilot study with healthy volunteers, supplementation with a single oral dose of vitamin D (100,000 IU vitamin D2) increased serum levels of 25D-hydroxyvitamin D from 27±2 ng/ml before supplementation to 44±3 ng/ml after supplementation (P<0.001). This response was associated with a 34% decrease in circulating levels of hepcidin within 24 hours of vitamin D supplementation (P<0.05). These data show that vitamin D is a potent regulator of the hepcidin-ferroportin axis in humans and highlight a potential new strategy for the management of anemia in patients with low vitamin D and/or CKD.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 11/2013; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The utilization of short-term daily hemodialysis has increased over the last few years, but little is known on its effects on the control of serum phosphate and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels. We therefore performed a cross-sectional study to compare FGF23 levels as well as other biochemical variables between 24 patients undergoing short daily hemodialysis using the NxStage System® and 54 patients treated with conventional in-center hemodialysis. FGF23 levels were measured using the second-generation Immutopics® C-terminal assay. Short daily hemodialysis patients were younger than patients on conventional hemodialysis but there were no differences between groups in the duration of end-stage renal disease nor in the number of patients with residual renal function. A greater number of short daily hemodialysis patients received vitamin D sterol therapy than did conventional in-center hemodialysis patients while there were no differences in the use of different phosphate binders and calcimimetic therapy between groups. Overall serum calcium, phosphorus and intact parathyroid hormone levels were similar between groups. While serum phosphorus levels correlated with FGF23 concentrations in each group separately [r = 0.522 (P < 0.01) and r = 0.42 (P < 0.01) in short daily and conventional in-center hemodialysis, respectively], FGF23 levels were lower [823 RU/mL (263, 2169)] in the patients receiving short daily hemodialysis than in patients treated with conventional hemodialysis [2521 RU/mL (909, 5556)] (P < 0.01 between groups). These findings demonstrate that FGF23 levels are significantly lower in short daily hemodialysis patients and suggest that FGF23 levels may be a more sensitive biomarker of cumulative phosphate burden than single or multiple serum phosphorus determinations in patients treated with hemodialysis.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 09/2013; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and vitamin D production and catabolism post-renal transplantation has not been characterized. Circulating creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, albumin, parathyroid hormone, FGF23, and 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D (calcitriol) values were obtained pre-transplantation, daily post-operatively for 5 days, and at 6 months post-transplantation in 44 patients aged 16.4 ± 0.4 years undergoing renal transplantation at UCLA from 1 August 2005 through to 30 April 2007. 25(OH) Vitamin D and 24,25(OH)2 vitamin D concentrations were obtained at baseline and on post-operative days 5 and 180, and urinary concentrations of creatinine, phosphorus, and FGF23 were measured on post-operative days 1, 3, 5, and 180. Circulating phosphate concentrations declined more rapidly and the fractional excretion of phosphorus was higher in the first week post-transplantation in subjects with higher FGF23 values. Fractional excretion of FGF23 was low at all time-points. Circulating 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels rose more rapidly and were consistently higher in patients with lower FGF23 values; however, 25(OH) vitamin D and 24,25(OH)2 vitamin D values were unrelated to FGF23 concentrations. Inhibition of renal 1α-hydroxylase, rather than stimulation of 24-hydroxylase, may primarily contribute to the relationship between FGF23 values and calcitriol. The rapid decline in FGF23 levels post-transplantation in our patient cohort was not mediated solely by the filtration of intact FGF23 by the new kidney.
    Pediatric Nephrology 07/2013; · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • J Bacchetta, K Wesseling-Perry
    Archives de Pédiatrie 05/2013; · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The effects of recombinant human growth hormone on renal osteodystrophy are unknown; thus, the effects of growth hormone (GH) on bone histomorphometry were assessed in pediatric patients with ESRD. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Thirty-three patients who underwent bone biopsy between July 1994 and May 1999 were randomly assigned to therapy with or without GH. Patients were stratified by bone formation rate; all patients with high bone turnover received intraperitoneal calcitriol. Serum biochemical values were obtained monthly, and bone biopsy was repeated after 8 months. RESULTS: Median patient age was 11.7 years (interquartile range [IQR], 7.6, 14.1 years); 45% of patients were male, and 52% were prepubertal. Median dialysis duration was 0.4 (IQR, 0.3, 0.8) year. Bone formation rate per bone surface increased from 15.0 (9.6, 21.8) to 154.6 (23.7, 174.3) μm(2)/μm(3) per year (P=0.05) in patients with low bone turnover treated with GH, decreased from 103.3 (57.0, 173.4) to 60.3 (20.3, 13.7) μm(2)/μm(3) per year in patients with high bone turnover receiving standard therapy (P=0.03), and was unchanged in the other two groups. Bone formation rates were higher with GH, irrespective of underlying bone histologic features (P=0.05). Parathyroid hormone did not differ between groups. GH therapy resulted in greater increases in height SD scores (estimated mean difference in change ± SD, 0.324±0.076; P<0.001), irrespective of underlying bone histologic features. CONCLUSIONS: GH therapy improves height in pediatric dialysis patients, irrespective of underlying bone histologic features. Bone formation rates are higher in GH recipients, and GH therapy alters the relationship between circulating parathyroid hormone values and bone turnover.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 04/2013; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) is a rare condition of poorly understood etiology and pathophysiology that affects otherwise healthy children. This condition is characterized clinically by bone pain and vertebral fractures; spontaneous recovery is observed after puberty in the majority of cases. Although decreased trabecular bone turnover has been noted previously, cortical and trabecular bone characteristics as determined by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and their relationship to bone histomorphometry are unknown. METHODS: All children with a clinical diagnosis of IJO who were followed in our center since 1995 and who had undergone at least one diagnostic bone biopsy were included in this cross-sectional analysis. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (11 males/4 females) with median ages of 5.8 and 10.2 years at first symptoms and at referral, respectively, were included in the analysis. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated decreased trabecular bone turnover (BFR/BS) in the majority of patients with heterogeneous parameters of trabecular mineralization and volume. QCTresults demonstrated that bone mineral density (BMD) was reduced in both trabecular/lumbar and cortical/femoral bone: Z score: -2.1 (-3.6;--1.0) and -0.9 (-8.2;1.4)in the two compartments, respectively. In the eight patients who underwent both bone biopsy and QCT, cortical BMD was associated with trabecular separation and with trabecular bone formation rate (r = 0.898 and -0.881, respectively, both p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This series confirms that IJO is characterized by impaired trabecular architecture that can be detected by both bone biopsy and QCT. The association between bone biopsy and QCT results may have implications for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of these children.
    Pediatric Rheumatology 02/2013; 11(1):6. · 1.47 Impact Factor
  • Katherine Wesseling-Perry, Isidro B Salusky
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    ABSTRACT: In order to minimize complications on the skeleton and to prevent extraskeletal calcifications, the specific aims of the management of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) are to maintain blood levels of serum calcium and phosphorus as close to the normal range as possible, thereby maintaining serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) at levels appropriate for CKD stage, preventing hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands, avoiding the development of extra-skeletal calcifications, and preventing or reversing the accumulation of toxic substances such as aluminum and β(2)-microglobulin. In order to limit cardiovascular calcification, daily intake of elemental calcium, including from dietary sources and from phosphate binders, should not exceed twice the daily recommended intake for age and should not exceed 2.5 g/day. Calcium-free phosphate binders, such as sevelamer hydrochloride and sevelamer carbonate, are safe and effective alternatives to calcium-based binders, and their use widens the margin of safety for active vitamin D sterol therapy. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent across the spectrum of CKD, and replacement therapy is recommended in vitamin D-deficient and insufficient individuals. Therapy with active vitamin D sterols is recommended after correction of the vitamin D deficiency state and should be titrated based on target PTH levels across the spectrum of CKD. Although the use of calcimimetic drugs has been proven to effectively control the biochemical features of secondary hyperparathyroidism, there is very limited experience with the use of such agents in pediatric patients and especially during the first years of life. Studies are needed to further define the role of such agents in the treatment of pediatric CKD-MBD.
    Pediatric Nephrology 02/2013; · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • Katherine Wesseling-Perry, Harald Jüppner
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    ABSTRACT: The identification of elevated circulating levels of the osteocytic protein fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), along with recent data linking these values to the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism and to systemic complications, has changed the approach to the pathophysiology and treatment of disordered bone and mineral metabolism in renal failure. It now appears that osteocyte biology is altered very early in the course of CKD and these changes have implications for bone biology, as well as for progressive cardiovascular and renal disease. Since circulating FGF23 values are influenced by therapies used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, the effects of different therapeutic paradigms on FGF23 have important implications for mineral metabolism as well as for morbidity and mortality. Further studies are critically needed to identify the initial trigger for abnormalities of skeletal mineralization and turnover as well as the potential effects that current therapeutic options may have on osteocyte biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Osteocyte.
    Bone 10/2012; · 3.82 Impact Factor
  • Katherine Wesseling-Perry
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    ABSTRACT: Children with long-standing chronic kidney disease (CKD) display clinical symptoms of bone disease, including bony deformities and fractures, which contribute to long-standing disability. Abnormalities in skeletal mineralization occur in a substantial proportion of this population and may contribute to chronic morbidity. Underscoring the potential contribution of parameters other than bone turnover to bone disease in CKD, a new definition for renal osteodystrophy (ROD), emphasizing the assessment of three key histologic descriptors, i.e., bone turnover (T), mineralization (M), and volume (V) (TMV), has been recommended in the assessment of all patients with CKD. Although bone biopsy is the only available method for assessing all three recommended areas of bone histology, this invasive procedure is not routinely used in any clinical setting; thus, a true understanding of the prevalence of abnormal turnover, defective mineralization, and altered bone volume throughout the course of CKD is limited. Recent data, however, have shed light on the progression of renal ROD throughout the course of CKD, including its early stages, as well as on the alterations in cell biology that accompany ROD.
    Pediatric Nephrology 10/2012; · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D is a potent stimulator of monocyte innate immunity, with this effect being mediated via intracrine conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2) D). In the kidney synthesis of 1,25(OH)(2) D is suppressed by fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), via transcriptional suppression of the vitamin D-activating enzyme 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1). We hypothesized that FGF23 also suppresses CYP27B1 in monocytes, with concomitant effects on intracrine responses to 1,25(OH)(2) D. Monocytes from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCm) and from peritoneal dialysate effluent from kidney disease patients (PDm) were assessed at baseline to confirm the presence of mRNA for FGF23 receptors (FGFRs), with Klotho and FGFR1 being more strongly expressed than FGFR2/3/4 in both cell types. Immunohistochemistry showed co-expression of Klotho and FGFR1 in PBMCm and PDm, with this effect being enhanced following treatment with FGF23 in PBMCm but not PDm. Treatment with FGF23 activated MAP kinase (MAPK) and Akt pathways in PBMCm, demonstrating functional FGFR signaling in these cells. FGF23 treatment of PBMCm and PDm decreased expression of mRNA for CYP27B1. In PBMCm this was associated with downregulation of 25OHD to 1,25(OH)(2) D metabolism, and concomitant suppression of intracrine induced 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) and antibacterial cathelicidin (LL37). FGF23 suppression of CYP27B1 was particularly pronounced in PBMCm treated with interleukin-15 to stimulate synthesis of 1,25(OH)(2) D. These data indicate that FGF23 can inhibit extra-renal expression of CYP27B1 and subsequent intracrine responses to 1,25(OH)(2) D in two different human monocyte models. Elevated expression of FGF23 may therefore play a crucial role in defining immune responses to vitamin D and this, in turn, may be a key determinant of infection in patients with CKD. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 08/2012; · 6.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD-MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD-MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 08/2012; 27(8):3063-71. · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • Justine Bacchetta, Pierre Cochat, Isidro B Salusky, Katherine Wesseling-Perry
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    ABSTRACT: Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone and a suppressor of renal 1α hydroxylase. Although circulating values of FGF23 are increased in early chronic kidney disease (CKD), the interplay between FGF23 levels, growth and nutritional biomarkers has not been evaluated in children with normal renal function. We performed a secondary analysis of the cross-sectional observational INU23 study in 98 children (51 boys, mean age 10.5 ± 3.9 years) with preserved renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 114 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). In bivariate analyses, C-terminal FGF23 levels were positively related to phosphorus and uric acid levels. Intact FGF23 levels were positively associated with uric acid and insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) levels, with similar results for age, body mass index (BMI), and 25OH vitamin D (25(OH)D). By multivariable analyses, 25(OH)D, uric acid, and phosphorus were independent predictors of C-terminal FGF23, while 25(OH)D, uric acid, and IGF1 were independent predictors of intact FGF23. In children with preserved kidney function, the association between FGF23, uric acid, and IGF1 suggests that FGF23 could be an early nutritional indicator of high protein and phosphate intake. The association between FGF23 and IGF1 also suggests a relationship between FGF23 and growth, and warrants further investigation.
    Pediatric Nephrology 02/2012; 27(7):1131-8. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), and indices of bone turnover and mineralization in children with early CKD is unknown; thus, this study characterizes the features of renal osteodystrophy and their relationship to biochemical markers of mineral metabolism. Fifty-two patients 2-21 years of age with predialysis CKD underwent tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy. Anthropomorphic measurements and biochemical values were obtained at the time of biopsy. Serum phosphorus levels were increased in 4% of patients with stage 3 CKD and 43% of those with stage 4/5 CKD. Parathyroid hormone concentrations were elevated in 36% of patients with stage 2, 71% with stage 3, and 93% with stage 4/5 CKD, whereas FGF-23 values were elevated in 81% of all patients, regardless of CKD stage. Bone turnover was normal in all patients with stage 2, but was increased in 13% with stage 3 and 29% with stage 4/5 CKD. Defective mineralization was present in 29% of patients with stage 2, 42% with stage 3, and 79% with stage 4/5 CKD. Defective skeletal mineralization was associated with lower serum calcium levels and increased parathyroid hormone concentrations. Elevated circulating FGF-23 levels and defects in skeletal mineralization early in the course of CKD suggest that factors other than the traditional markers of mineral deficiency play a crucial role in the development of renal bone disease.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 11/2011; 7(1):146-52. · 5.07 Impact Factor
  • Katherine Wesseling-Perry
    Clinical Chemistry 09/2011; 57(11):1476-7. · 7.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although current guidelines recommend the evaluation of mineral and bone metabolism in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the prevalence of altered mineral ion homeostasis in the pediatric posttransplant population is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of abnormal mineral ion metabolism to graft outcomes in this population has not been evaluated. Serum calcium, phosphorus, 25(OH)vitamin D, 1,25(OH)(2)vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) levels were evaluated 4.9 ± 0.5 years after transplantation in 68 stable pediatric renal allograft recipients. Patients were subsequently followed for 2 years. At baseline, mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 60 ± 2 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Serum calcium and phosphorus values were within the reference interval. PTH values were elevated but did not differ by CKD stage. 25(OH)vitamin D levels were low in nearly half of all subjects. Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH)(2)vitamin D values were lower, while FGF-23 and PTH values were higher in more advanced stages of CKD. Thirty percent of patients with FGF-23 values >110 RU/mL had a decrease in GFR of >50% (P < 0.05) and FGF-23 values predicted future episodes of rejection. Despite normal serum calcium and phosphorus levels in the majority of prevalent pediatric renal transplant recipients, abnormalities in PTH, 25(OH)vitamin D and FGF-23 are common. FGF-23 levels may be associated with increased risk for deterioration of kidney function and episodes of rejection.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 03/2011; 26(11):3779-84. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    Katherine Wesseling-Perry, Justine Bacchetta
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    ABSTRACT: Successful kidney transplantation corrects many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, skeletal and cardiovascular morbidity remain prevalent in pediatric kidney transplant recipients and current recommendations from the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group suggest that bone disease-including turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth, and strength-as well as cardiovascular disease be evaluated in all patients with CKD. Although few studies have examined bone histology after renal transplantation, current data suggest that bone turnover and mineralization are altered in the majority of patients and that biochemical parameters are poor predictors of bone histology in this population. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning, although widely performed, has significant limitations in the pediatric transplant population and values have not been shown to correlate with fracture risk; thus, DXA is not recommended as a tool for the assessment of bone density. Newer imaging techniques, including computed tomography (quantitative CT (QCT), peripheral QCT (pQCT), high resolution pQCT (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), which provide volumetric assessments of bone density and are able to discriminate bone microarchitecture, show promise in the assessment of bone strength; however, future studies are needed to define the value of these techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in pediatric renal transplant recipients.
    Pediatric Nephrology 03/2011; 26(12):2143-51. · 2.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

277 Citations
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132.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2013
    • Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2012
    • CHU de Lyon - Hôpital Femme-Mère-Enfant
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France